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News: VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: ARTIST TALK: James Walsh | JAMES WALSH: THE ELEMENTAL at Berry Campbell, New York, March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: ARTIST TALK: James Walsh | JAMES WALSH: THE ELEMENTAL at Berry Campbell, New York

March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

In this video, James Walsh gives an artist talk for his exhibition, James Walsh: THE ELEMENTAL.

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News: Judith Godwin Studio Visit With the Chrysler Museum of Art, March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin Studio Visit With the Chrysler Museum of Art

March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Dr. Kimberli Gant, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia, visiting Judith Godwin’s studio in Greenwich Village, New York. Left to right: Martha Campbell, Christine Berry, Kimberli Gant, Judith Godwin.
 
 
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News: Susan Vecsey |

Susan Vecsey | "Blue" at the Nassau County Museum of Art

March 14, 2020

March 14 - July 5, 2020
Nassau County Museum of Art
Roslyn Harbor, New York

What color means more to us than blue? Even among the primaries, the color of the sky and sea commands a privileged place, by far the most popular hue in the spectrum according to surveys on every continent. Blue casts its spell, pushing beyond symbolism to a deeper emotional level, drawing us into its pure and distant mysteries. Every artist goes through a “blue period,” from the Mediterranean blues of Matisse and Yves Klein to the haunting auras of Redon. Blue has been holy to Egyptian, Hindu, Chinese and Western traditions. Its physical sources (cobalt, ultramarine, cerulean, indigo, lapis lazuli, cyan) are a catalogue of valued materials that rival gold itself. As this exhibition exuberantly proves, the power of blue transcends art history. Poets, filmmakers, musicians and designers have tapped its resonant appeal. The most original music in America (home of bluejeans, “democracy in fashion”) is the blues. We are turning the entire museum over to the multi-media exploration of blue in many incarnations. It spans history and geography, from the precious lapis lazuli of antiquity to paintings, photographs, sculpture, ceramics, cyanotypes, and fashion. As Miró said, “This is the color of my dreams.”

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News: Parrish Art Museum | TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW: Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See, February 25, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum

Parrish Art Museum | TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW: Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See

February 25, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum

TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW

Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See 
February 28, 6 pm - 7:30 pm

Alicia Longwell, the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Chief Curator, Art and Education, highlights women artists in this seven-part exhibition that contextualizes the artists’ work through the lens of how they see and interpret the world around them.

VENUE
Parrish Art Museum
279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, NY 11976 United States 

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News: On its own terms: “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard, February 25, 2020 - Kim Uchiyama for Two Coats of Paint

On its own terms: “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard

February 25, 2020 - Kim Uchiyama for Two Coats of Paint

Contributed by Kim Uchiyama / “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard Gallery illuminates a particular moment in 20th century art history where works created by a variety of artists occupied the space between the then diverging ideologies of a young Donald Judd and those of the older critic Clement Greenberg. Saul Ostrow has curated a finely-tuned exhibit that demonstrates the highly individual modes of thought that were at play during this transitional time, ideas distinct from the critical positions of Minimalism, Pop and Color-field.

The movement known as Abstract Expressionism – a “movement” itself comprised of highly individualistic artists – can be seen in retrospect as the physical and psychological response to the global tensions of World War II. Mary Gabriel, in Ninth Street Women, her invaluable contribution to understanding the full scope of this era, emphasizes the war – and the lead up to war – as the underpinning for the formation of a new American art which would reflect the exigencies of the moment. The works in “Specific Forms” came about because these times had changed. Post-war America lacked the angst of the 1940s and 1950s, and was increasingly replaced in the 1960s and 1970s by an art that sought to look to itself reflexively, on its own terms – the thing being the thing itself.

 In an era characterized by an implicit questioning of authority and established norms, these fourteen artists sought to break the mold of existing “-isms” and are seemingly preoccupied in creating a new consciousness via their art. The resulting works are highly specific unto themselves and characterized by strikingly individualistic terms for their existence.

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News: Perle Fine: The Accordment Series featured on Artsy, February 18, 2020 - Artsy

Perle Fine: The Accordment Series featured on Artsy

February 18, 2020 - Artsy

Perle Fine | The Accordment Series 
February 13 - March 14, 2020

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News: VIDEO: Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever, February 14, 2020 - TheaterBuffs

VIDEO: Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever

February 14, 2020 - TheaterBuffs

In this video, Eric Dever is interviewed by Patrick Christiano.

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