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News: The Hudson Review | At the Galleries by Karen Wilkin features "Nanette Carter: Shape Shifting", August  6, 2022 - Karen Wilkin for The Hudson Review

The Hudson Review | At the Galleries by Karen Wilkin features "Nanette Carter: Shape Shifting"

August 6, 2022 - Karen Wilkin for The Hudson Review


Nanette Carter: Destabilizing #3, 2022. Oil on Mylar, 61 x 71 1/2 in. (154.9 x 181.6 cm)


Excerpt from "At the Galleries by Karen Wilkin"


Also in Chelsea, Berry Campbell Gallery showed “Nanette Carter: Shape Shifting,” recent works that, like Loving’s mixed-media collages, ignore the traditional rectangle and traditional materials, while making their physicality and material presence crucial to their meaning. That similarity is not surprising. Loving was the much younger Carter’s close friend and a mentor. Yet despite her clear connection to the vibrant tradition of African American abstract art—she shares with Loving and Gilliam, for example, a faith in the expressive possibilities of process—Carter investigates terrain all her own. Her stubbornly abstract images are highly charged, like metaphors for things we can’t quite grasp. She exploits the way oil paint sits up on Mylar to invent seductive striations and scrapings, creating a distinctive palette of textures that modulates a range of blacks, greys, off-greens and blues, sparked with ochre and occasional hits of ultramarine. The most ambitious, largest works on view, Destabilizing #1 (2021) and Destabilizing #3 (2022), appeared to hover, unconstrained, against the wall, their overlapped shapes and bars seemingly coalescing only momentarily. We saw through parts of their configurations, so that the wall itself became part of the equation. In Destabilizing #1, a stack of emphatic black bars floated free of the piled image to claim new visual and spatial territory and pose interesting questions about illusion and object. Other recent wall-mounted works depended on openwork structures, like constructed sculptures or ritual objects, unhampered by concerns about support. Loving’s and Carter’s exhibitions briefly coincided, offering a fortuitous opportunity to explore the evidence of both resonance and independence in the work of these inventive colleagues and friends. Continue Reading

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News: Chelsea Summer 2022, July 25, 2022 - Michael Wolf

Chelsea Summer 2022

July 25, 2022 - Michael Wolf

Walter Darby Bannard at Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell presents the work of Walter Darby Bannard, a leading figure in color field painting in the 1950s. In “Vanadium,” Bannard emphasized the opticality of the painted surface, applying gesso with a squeegee leaving fine ridges. Thin layers of light green and ochre were poured and allowed to settle in the creases.

In “Glass Mountain Fireball,” Bannard’s liquid paint technique sees orange and yellow tints wash over green underpainting. While many artists are secretive about their methods, Berry says that Bannard freely explained his process, confident that other artists “aren’t going to be able to do it.” Having been the head of the painting department at the University of Miami, we can assume his claim was accurate.

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News: ON VIEW: Jill Nathanson at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, July 20, 2022 - Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

ON VIEW: Jill Nathanson at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

July 20, 2022 - Museum of Fine Arts, Houston


Jill Nathanson
Breath Woven 11, 2019
Acrylic and polymers on Yupo paper
24 12 x 18 inches
Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

View Works by Jill Nathanson

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News: ON VIEW:  Judith Godwin at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., July 18, 2022 - National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

ON VIEW: Judith Godwin at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

July 18, 2022 - National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Judith Godwin
Seated Figure, 1955
Oil on canvas
83 x 47 inches
Collection of National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

View Works by Judith Godwin

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News: Hyperallergic | The Biggest Lie About Abstract Expressionism, July 11, 2022 - Max Lunn for Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic | The Biggest Lie About Abstract Expressionism

July 11, 2022 - Max Lunn for Hyperallergic

The Biggest Lie About Abstract Expressionism
Max Lunn
July 11, 2022

We were told that women were on the peripheries of the artistic movement, while in fact they were driving it forward, energetically engaging in this radical pictorial language.

Abstract Expressionism is a storied movement continually re-told at blockbuster museums: We think we know it so well. The story, however, is still wrong. There are no women in it. The most recent show in the United Kingdom was at the Royal Academy of Arts in London in 2017. The exhibition projected an outdated image of the swaggering machismo the movement has come to be known for. Lee Krasner was the only woman exhibited. 

More recently, a bold exhibition at Huxley-Parlour Gallery in London entitled Women and the Void, hoped to correct this. It showed works from some of the better-known and under-appreciated women artists, including Jay Defoe, Mary Abbott, and Michael West.

Now is the time to examine this exclusion, given the work done by writers like Mary Gabriel to understand these artists; her 2018 book Ninth Street Women chronicled their art and lives.

There has been no major group show of women Abstract Expressionists in the UK, and only one elsewhere at the Denver Art Museum. Huxley Parlour’s exhibition demonstrated that women were not only present, but central, to the movement’s origins. By focusing on works on paper and including work from beyond the bigger names, the show affirmed the polyvalent output women have made — take Anne Ryan’s layered 1951 collage. Other highlights included striking work by Perle Fine and Alma Thomas, the latter of whose inclusion evidences another major absence: Black artists.

Both the 2019 Barbican Centre retrospective of Lee Krasner’s work and Dulwich Picture Gallery’s exhibition of Helen Frankenthaler’s printmaking career are further indicators of interest, as is the current Joan Mitchell retrospective currently at the Baltimore Museum of Art

These three women, however, are exceptions and still not valued to the extent their male equivalents are. Although a crude metric, the auction market gives some idea: Rothko’s record stands at $86.9 million, whilst leading the women is Lee Krasner at $11.7 million

Institutional recognition at a group level is arguably little better: The Whitney Museum’s recent show Labyrinth of Forms: Women and Abstraction is indicative of museums’ willingness to invest in these women. Or rather, lack of willingness: The exhibition was criticized for its small footprint and handful of works, despite the museum’s extensive archive holdings. This speaks of a wider tension between museum-as-artist-champion and museum-as-business. 

This exclusion matters because it is a lie. Women weren’t working on the peripheries, they were driving the movement forward, energetically engaging in this radical pictorial language.

Before Abstract Expressionism was cast as the familiar macho movement in the mid-1950s — guided by the vernacular of critics such as Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg — a democratic spirit pervaded US abstraction. This was in part due to the withering attitude taken towards abstract art which meant artists were not competing, but collaborating. 

Out of this spirit, the collaborative organizations American Abstract Artists (AAA) and Atelier 17 emerged to champion abstraction, the latter with a focus on works on paper. A notable 40% of Atelier 17 members were women. Members included artists who became associated with Abstract Expressionism: Perle Fine, Jackson Pollock, and Willem De Kooning. Abstraction crucially offered women aesthetic liberty: Perle Fine commented it allowed her to escape from the “oppressive particularities” of realism. 

This is not to say it was all plain sailing. Some women artists changed their names to avoid bias: “Dorris” to “Dorr” Bothwell, and the oft-recounted comments from Hans Hofmann that Elaine de Kooning and Lee Krasner’s work being “so good that you would not know it was done by a woman” speak volumes. 

While factors such as the male-only requirement for “the club” — the East 8th Street spot in Manhattan where artists met — played a role, art historians have generally pinpointed the rise of the abstract art market as being the moment women were pushed out. As Mary Gabriel puts it: “When art became a ‘business’ in the turbocharged consumer economy of the late 1950s, work by women artists wasn’t considered as valuable … which meant dealers didn’t show it, collectors didn’t buy it, and art history courses failed to mention it.” The previous plurality of styles was replaced by a handful of male “masters,” befitting of the Cold War politics of the day. 

But we know these women were there: The now-famous 1951 Ninth Street Show, considered the debut of Abstract Expressionism, had three women on its committee: Fine, Mitchell, and Elaine de Kooning. Why are museums such as the Royal Academy still getting it wrong?

There are tedious reasons such as the need to guarantee ticket sales. But there are also relevant ideas about artistic value. The Denver exhibition and the Frankenthaler exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery argue that these women deserve attention because they were innovators: Jane Findlay, curator of the Dulwich exhibition, said she put innovation “front and centre.”

Huxley-Parlour hosted a panel talk, where the Barbican curator Eleanor Nairne questioned why so much emphasis is placed on innovation as a metric when valuing artists, and if this helps achieves parity. She commented it’s inherently market-driven: “If someone has a singular style, then they are uniquely identifiable for their imagery, and so we feel more comfortable championing them as a ‘master’”. She explained society has been more lenient allowing male artists to cycle through different styles before landing on a single identifiable one: Think of Rothko, whose biomorphs are seen as the preamble to his signature multiforms. 

Nairne broadened out the idea, considered innovation in conjunction with Hilma af Klint, who she says was only canonized because she created abstract work a year before Kandinsky — what would have happened if it was the next year? Maybe, therefore, we shouldn’t ask what these women were doing “differently,” but simply what they were doing. 

The scholarship has been tirelessly corrected, the books have been re-written: It’s clear that women were front and center of Abstract Expressionism. But the power of a simple narrative of a few great men still stands in the way of experiencing the richness of mid-century abstraction. It’s time to flesh the story out.



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Group Exhibition Featuring Work by Susan Vecsey

July 7, 2022

Curated by Steven Cabral, Lisa Petker Mintz, and Christopher Schade
The Painting Center, New York
July 19 - August 13, 2022
 
Opening Reception
Thursday, July 21, 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
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News: Frederick J. Brown Acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, July  7, 2022

Frederick J. Brown Acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

July 7, 2022

Frederick J. Brown (1945 - 2012)
Untitled, 1972
Acrylic on canvas
28 1/2 x 26 inches
 
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News: Aphorisms for Artists: 100 Ways Toward Better Art Featured in The Critic's Notebook, July  7, 2022 - James Panero for The New Criterion

Aphorisms for Artists: 100 Ways Toward Better Art Featured in The Critic's Notebook

July 7, 2022 - James Panero for The New Criterion

By Walter Darby Bannard
Foreword and Afterword by Franklin Einspruch
 
Exhibition Review by Piri Halasz
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News: ARTSEEN | Perle Fine: A Retrospective, July  7, 2022 - Tennae Maki for the Brooklyn Rail

ARTSEEN | Perle Fine: A Retrospective

July 7, 2022 - Tennae Maki for the Brooklyn Rail

Gazelli Gallery, London
Tennae Maki for The Brooklyn Rail
 
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News: Intersect Aspen Art Fair , July  7, 2022

Intersect Aspen Art Fair

July 7, 2022

Ida Kohlmeyer, Monolith #1B, 1979, mixed media on canvas, 60 x 52 1/2 inches.

Booth B13
July 31 - August 4, 2022
VIP Preview Brunch | Sunday, July 31 | 10 - 11 a.m.
 
Aspen Ice Garden 
233 W Hyman Avenue
Aspen, CO 81611
 
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News: Edward Avedisian John Opper, Larry Zox | Hard-Edged Geometric Abstraction, Upsilon Gallery, New York, June 29, 2022 - Upsilon Gallery

Edward Avedisian John Opper, Larry Zox | Hard-Edged Geometric Abstraction, Upsilon Gallery, New York

June 29, 2022 - Upsilon Gallery

Hard-Edged Geometric Abstraction
Upsilon Gallery, New York
June 24 - July 30, 2022

More Information

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News: Intersect Aspen Instagram Features Dan Christensen, Pipeline, 1989, June 23, 2022 - Intersect Aspen

Intersect Aspen Instagram Features Dan Christensen, Pipeline, 1989

June 23, 2022 - Intersect Aspen



Intersect Aspen
July 31 - August 4, 2022
More Information

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News: From the Mayor's Doorstep: Darby Bannard's Annus Mirabilis: See First. Name Later. at Berry Campbell, June 19, 2022 - Piri Halasz

From the Mayor's Doorstep: Darby Bannard's Annus Mirabilis: See First. Name Later. at Berry Campbell

June 19, 2022 - Piri Halasz

Here I am, back in the land of the living. Still not sure whether or not I'll be able to maintain my previous pace, but meanwhile here's a review of the current & frankly beautiful show at Berry Campbell – which is "Walter Darby Bannard: See First, Name Later: Paintings 1972-1976" (through July 1).

The middle part of this tripartite title is a quotation from a slender book by Bannard recently published by Signature 16, an imprint of Letter 16 Press of Miami The book is "Aphorisms for Artists: 100 Ways Toward Better Art," and I plan to review it on another occasion, but this review is about Bannard's show, whose 16 pictures are both stunning and classically serene.

MORE BACKGROUND THAN YOU REALLY NEED
Before these paintings were made, Bannard (1934-2016) had been reasonably well-known within the art world, having appeared in two of the biggest and best-publicized group shows of abstract art in the '60s: "Post-Painterly Abstraction" (1964), organized by Clement Greenberg for the Los Angeles County Museum, and "The Responsive Eye" (1965), organized by William Seitz for the Museum of Modern Art.

However, the Greenberg show didn't include only those younger and/or lesser-known '60s painters – like Kenneth Noland and Jack Bush – whom the critic had made a point of celebrating.  Rather, it was a huge grab bag of '60s abstract painters of every kind whose sole common denominator was that instead of using the loose brushwork that had been employed by most (if not all) of the first-generation abstract expressionist painters in the '40s and '50s they were creating "hard-edged" images. 

(This trait they shared with figurative pop artists of the '60s like Warhol and Lichtenstein, who were getting far more publicity. I have long suspected that this show was Greenberg's way of showing that abstract artists of the '60s were as radical stylistically as pop – hence deserving the same attention.  "Style" to him was always the key element. "Subject matter' -- or lack of it -- was beside the point. But I digress.)

Similarly, the Seitz exhibition was a grab bag. It was intended to feature '60s paintings so "hard-edged" that they played tricks with the vision of their viewers, but only some work in the show was truly tricksy. Bridget Riley and Richard Anuszkiewicz, whose work did fit that category, soon became known as "op artists" ("op" being a term coined by my predecessor as writer on art for Time, Jon Borgzinner). But the show also included artists like Noland and Bannard whose work wasn't tricksy at all, and would go down in history as "color-field" painters or "modernists" instead.

THE MOMENT OF TRUTH
During the '60s, though, Bannard's paintings had been minimalist, not "modernist," bland in color and not only hard-edge but also geometric in composition.  Only in the early '70s did he loosen up and create more fluid, painterly and coloristically close-valued pictures.  

Such pictures would make him one of the top artists most intimately associated with Greenberg.  They would also make him a leader among the far larger number of yet younger painters who shared Greenberg's taste for the again-painterly and -- more importantly, coloristically close-valued --- pictures of Jules Olitski.

This meant that Bannard became better and better known within the Greenbergian community -- while slipping from the sight of all those "trendier" observers who couldn't see beyond the charms of pop and its intimate ally, the more familiar minimal.

It's in this context that the paintings of the current show were created – a context in which Bannard was abandoning the relatively popular and familiar in order to strike out in a new and more perilous direction.  This must have taken courage – a lot of courage – and I think that's what's incorporated into "See First; Name Later."

Although I didn't become acquainted with Bannard's paintings until the 1980s, his work from the '70s and that of the '80s form a continuum that made me feel at ease with the work in this show. I have never felt that way with Bannard's earlier minimalist work – but with this show, I had a feeling of at last coming home.

NOVEL TECHNIQUES
At the beginning of this most revolutionary period of his career, Bannard was applying paint using diapers instead of brushes and/or closing off areas of his canvases with masking tape.  So says Franklin Einspruch, former student from Bannard's later years at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, keeper of the online archive of writings by and about Bannard, and editor of Aphorisms for Artists, in his "Afterword" to that book.

Three of these very experimental works from 1972 are on view here: the still somewhat-tentative "Sampson" and "Westminster," hanging at the very back of the gallery, in a small area seemingly devoted to the thrill of discovery, and "Sometime," a miniature symphony of off-whites measuring only 14 x 10 inches and hanging on the outside wall, just to the left of the door leading to the street.

By the mid '70s, though, Bannard had discovered the joys of applying paint (and occasionally gel) with squeegees.  Especially the paintings here from the later '70s display his mastery of this humble tool. (Lisa N. Peters, in her catalogue essay to this show, says only that he used "squeegee-like tools," but Einspruch, himself a painter, says flat-out that these were squeegees.

(Although squeegees may be more often associated with garden-variety housekeeping --as workmen's tools for window-washing and floor-scraping, they come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and forms, and are part of many artists' toolkits -- as they are widely used in studios in the making of screen prints).

THE SHOW ITSELF
Regardless of their actual dates and the actual tools employed, almost all of the paintings in this show hang together in seamless collegiality.  They are grouped together in ways that show common sweeps and coils of shape as well as contrasts in dominant and close-valued color.

This canny juxtaposition continues throughout the show. The first large gallery space is devoted to three fine pictures in a paler spectrum.  Facing the street is the vertical, putty-colored "Morning in Detroit" (1974); on the west wall is the large, nearly square and reddish yellowy "Yucatan" (1973), and with its back to the street is the grayish vertical "Vanadium" (1976), with turquoise and purple accents.

The space adjoining this space has mostly darker, mellower pictures, among them "Calico Bend" *1976), "Dakota Run" (1976), and the small but monumental "California Rambler" (1976).

Still, the most significant layout is the one that first greets the visitor upon entering from the street. In addition to "Sometime," with its startlingly early date, two other paintings share this area: "Dover Down" (1973), on the east wall, to the left of the entry, and "Cairo Passing" (1975), facing the entry. The former is built around pale, buttery browns and tans, and the latter, around vaguely grays and blues.

If, however, the visitor makes a hard right, s/he sees the mostly-light-red "Glass Mountain Fireball" (1975).

Hanging high and highly visible over the receptionist's desk, this painting indeed glows: its fundamental red ornamented with accents of green and yellow.  One can see how the image resembles a ball of fire. Yet I don't for a moment believe that the artist was trying to depict such a subject.

Like all passionate abstractionists, he had no subject at all in mind when he started to paint this picture. Only dafter it was finished did he ask himself what he was reminded of by it. In other words, he was following the dictum laid down by this moving exhibition's aphoristic title: "See First, Name Later."

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News: Museum Exhibition: Order/Reorder: Experiments with Collections, Hudson River Museum, New York | Frederick J. Brown and Nanette Carter, June 18, 2022 - Hudson River Museum

Museum Exhibition: Order/Reorder: Experiments with Collections, Hudson River Museum, New York | Frederick J. Brown and Nanette Carter

June 18, 2022 - Hudson River Museum

Order/Reorder: Experiments with Collections
Hudson River Museum, New York
June 17, 2022–September 3, 2023
More Information



Frederick J. Brown, The First Time Around, 1985, oil and pencil on paper, 42 x 29 3/4 inches.

Art as both creative output and curated object is in constant dialogue with the past and the present. It is this never-ending conversation that pushes art into its future, forcing us to continually reimagine the ways in which we project a vision of ourselves and the world around us. Order / Reorder: Experiments with Collections explores approaches to looking at American art that consider expressions of American identity from new perspectives.

The works on view range across genres: portraiture, figural studies, still life, landscape, and abstraction. Recent additions to the Museum’s collection and other artworks on view for the first time are joined by visitor favorites, paired with special loans from the Joslyn Art Museum and contributions from regional artists. Rather than structured chronologically, the installation is designed to spark discussion through juxtapositions of styles, outlooks, and eras. Works by renowned artists are in conversation with those now emerging.


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News: Berry Campbell Announces Its New Location, June 15, 2022 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Announces Its New Location

June 15, 2022 - Berry Campbell

 

After nine successful years on West 24th Street in Chelsea, Berry Campbell is excited to announce that we will be moving two blocks north to a new expanded gallery space on West 26th Street. 

Berry Campbell will begin the transition to its new space at 524 West 26th Street on September 1, 2022. We are honored to be moving to this pedigreed location that has previously been the home of the prestigious Paula Cooper Gallery and Robert Miller Gallery. 

The new Berry Campbell, which will boast a total of 9,000 square feet, will support the continued expansion of our exhibition program and allow us to better serve the evolving needs of both our clients and the artists and estates whom we are fortunate to represent.

Our new location houses 4,500 square feet of exhibition space, including a skylit main gallery and four smaller galleries, as well as two private viewing areas, a full-sized library, executive offices, and substantial on-site storage space. 

We first launched Berry Campbell in 2013 with a collaborative vision to emphasize the contributions of the many postwar and contemporary artists who had been left behind due to race, gender, and/or geography. In 2015, we doubled our exhibition space to its current size of 2,000 square feet.

Reflecting upon these past nine years has left us tremendously grateful. We maintain a well-curated roster of thirty-four represented artists and estates with a rich secondary market program.

Over the years, Berry Campbell has held eighty-one exhibitions and countless focus shows as well as collaborated with museums and curators both domestically and internationally. Further, Berry Campbell has successfully placed works in private, corporate, and museum collections, and has fostered relationships with collectors, curators, educators, institutions, press, other galleries, and the general public.

We are also proud to have been recognized and reviewed in many respected publications such as Architectural DigestArt & Antiques, Art in America, Artforum, ArtNews, The Brooklyn Rail, The Hopkins Review, Huffington Post, Hyperallergic, East Hampton Star, Luxe Magazine, The New Criterion, The New York Times, Vogue, Wall Street Journal, and Whitehot Magazine of Contemporary Art.


Berry Campbell is pleased to announce that it will inaugurate its new space with a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Elizabeth Osborne, opening with a reception on Thursday, September 8, 2022, 6 to 8 p.m.

The final exhibition at our current West 24th Street gallery will feature recent paintings by Eric Dever. The opening reception is scheduled for Thursday, September 15, 2022, 6 to 8 p.m. 

We are excited to be able to share this news and begin this new chapter of the gallery. We look forward to welcoming you to our new space this fall.

With gratitude, 
Christine and Martha


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News: In Conversation | Perle Fine: A Retrospective, Gazelli Art House, London, June 14, 2022 - Gazelli Art House

In Conversation | Perle Fine: A Retrospective, Gazelli Art House, London

June 14, 2022 - Gazelli Art House

In Conversation with Daniel Zamani and Jennifer Higgie
Perle Fine: A Retrospective | Rediscovery of Perle Fine
Gazelli Art House

Tuesday, July 21, 2022
6 - 8 pm (BST)
Register

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News: Christine Berry and Martha Campbell attend the Black Arts Council Gala, Museum of Modern Art, June 14, 2022 - Berry Campbell

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell attend the Black Arts Council Gala, Museum of Modern Art

June 14, 2022 - Berry Campbell


Christine Berry, Phyllis Hollis, and Martha Campbell attend the Black Arts Council Gala

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News: Modernist Collection | John Opper's Mid-Century Abstraction, June  1, 2022 - Modernist Collection Magazine

Modernist Collection | John Opper's Mid-Century Abstraction

June 1, 2022 - Modernist Collection Magazine


Active as a painter for over six decades, John Opper's intriguing canvases are distinguised by large, dynamically-interlocking planes of color. Continue Reading


Modernist Collection Website
Modernist Collection Instagram

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News: Berry Campbell Exclusively Represents the Estate of Lynne Mapp Drexler (1928-1999), May 18, 2022

Berry Campbell Exclusively Represents the Estate of Lynne Mapp Drexler (1928-1999)

May 18, 2022

Berry Campbell Exclusively Represents the Estate of Lynne Mapp Drexler (1928-1999)


BIOGRAPHY
On April 1, 2022, Artnet News headlined an article: “She Painted for Decades in Obscurity on a Remote Island in Maine. Suddenly, Collectors Can’t Get Enough of Lynne Drexler.”1 In addition, Drexler’s Deciduous Empire, 1964 (private collection) was on the cover of Art & Antiques in December 2021–January 2022, and her work was featured in an article in the issue.2 Such a recent surge of interest in the art of Lynne Mapp Drexler (1928–1999) is due partly to the new recognition of American women artists’ important contributions to the story of twentieth-century abstraction.3 It can also be attributed to the intensity, vivacity, and integrity of Drexler’s work. While she adopted the methods of action painting and understood the role of gesture—she was a student of Hans Hofmann and Robert Motherwell—she was part of the second-generation of Abstract Expressionists—including Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Larry Rivers—who turned to the outside world rather than their inner selves for inspiration. In doing so, Drexler incorporated aspects of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism into her vivid, innovative paintings.

Drexler’s inspiration derived primarily from Monhegan Island, the tiny, rockbound island off the coast of Maine—long loved by artists—which she began visiting in the 1960s and where she settled permanently in 1983. She painted with both an exuberant and careful technique, featuring her signature directional and variously sized brush swatches. Her resulting canvases are reminiscent of the dazzling dissolved surfaces in the paintings of Gustav Klimt. Through the act of painting, Drexler expressed her responses to the physical, human, and spiritual aspects of her surroundings and explored her identity as a manifestation of her context. She was not a vanitas artist, dwelling on human mortality. In her work, the resonances of nature are always joyous, growing, and uplifting, as she embraced the moment.

Drexler was born in Newport News, Virginia in 1928, the only child of Norman Edward Drexler (1890–1944), a manager at a public utility, and Lynne Powell Drexler (1892–1963), a descendant of a distinguished Southern family; her ancestors included the second Royal Governor of Virginia and Robert E. Lee. By 1930, the family had moved to Elizabeth City, Virginia (now Hampton). Drexler began painting classes in her childhood, and she exhibited the rebellious and irreverent streak for which she was known even then: in an interview in 1998 she recalled that when she piped up in a seventh-grade class that her ancestor Robert E. Lee was a traitor, she was “in considerable disgrace for a while.” She commented about Lee: “Well he was a traitor. . . . And if had never fought for the South the war would have been a lot shorter.”4 A child of Southern privilege, Drexler attended St. Anne’s School, a private Episcopal girls’ boarding school in Charlottesville, Virginia (now St. Anne’s-Belfield School). In the late 1940s, she took classes at the Richmond Professional Institute, Virginia, and enrolled in the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. At the same time, she took a night course with Maine artist Thomas Elston Thorne (1909–1976), who encouraged her to paint. In Williamsburg, she met the modernist architect Ward Bennett (né Howard Bernstein, 1917–2003), who had studied with Hans Hofmann. He implored her to go to New York. She was similarly urged by Peter Kahn, who was an art teacher at the nearby Hampton Institute. He suggested to Drexler that she study with his brother Wolf Kahn and with Hofmann. Continue Reading
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News: Elizabeth Osborne Acquired by the Delaware Art Museum, May 17, 2022 - Delaware Art Museum

Elizabeth Osborne Acquired by the Delaware Art Museum

May 17, 2022 - Delaware Art Museum



Delaware Art Museum, Louisa du Pont Copeland Memorial Fund, partial gift from the artist, and purchased with funds donated by Doug Schaller and David Barquist, Brad Greenwood and Anne M. Lampe, 2022.

Elizabeth Osborne Acquired by the Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington
 
Elizabeth Osborne
Red Wall, 2021
Oil on canvas
48 x 36 inches
Signed, dated and titled on verso

 
The Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington, Delaware has served as a primary arts and cultural institution for over 100 years in Delaware. Visit delart.org.
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News: Eric Dever Acquired by The Heckscher Museum of Art, May 14, 2022 - The Heckscher Museum of Art

Eric Dever Acquired by The Heckscher Museum of Art

May 14, 2022 - The Heckscher Museum of Art



Collection of the Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, New York.
 
Eric Dever Acquired by The Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, New York
 
Eric Dever
Moorlands, 2020
Oil on canvas
30 x 36 inches
Signed, titled, and dated on verso
 
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News: Susan Vecsey featured in Architectural Digest Middle East | This Upper East Side Apartment Shows How To Decorate A Bedroom Of Dreams, May  7, 2022 - Saiqa Ajmal for Architectural Digest Middle East

Susan Vecsey featured in Architectural Digest Middle East | This Upper East Side Apartment Shows How To Decorate A Bedroom Of Dreams

May 7, 2022 - Saiqa Ajmal for Architectural Digest Middle East

This Upper East Side Apartment Shows How To Decorate A Bedroom Of Dreams

Eric Winnick of E. Lawrence Design has curated a tailored yet comfortable space for a downsizing fifty-something couple


Photo: Reid Rolls

Tell us about a standout artwork.

There’s a piece in the bedroom by Long-Island-based artist Susan Vecsey which adds to the tranquility of the space. She’s known for paintings that evoke a sunrise type of setting, but in a very abstract way.

What’s your approach to using colour and pattern?
I like to use colour with restraint.  My palettes tend to be very neutral with pops of colour. I’m drawn to cooler neutrals; I always feel the palette should be warm with touches of vibrancy. The walls throughout this space are a taupe that gives off a cloud like texture, which allows for statement artworks and a rug that grounds the living room and also serves as its own work of art. Continue Reading

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News: The Hopkins Review Presents: A Conversation with Jill Nathanson, May  7, 2022 - Thu Nhat Pham for The Hopkins Review

The Hopkins Review Presents: A Conversation with Jill Nathanson

May 7, 2022 - Thu Nhat Pham for The Hopkins Review

Jill Nathanson in conversation with Thu Nhat Pham, THR Editorial Assistant


Jill Nathanson, Light Wrestle, 2020, 45 1/2 x 95 1/2 inches. Private Collection.

How did the paintings [in the folio] come to be?

It’s hard to know where to start. I think abstract painting, for any serious painter, is a manifestation of a whole understanding of what painting is about and what abstract painting might do. The paintings manifest something about painting and about abstract painting: I’ll leave that to the side.

I’ll say that the paintings in the folio are painted with thick poured acrylic polymer paints, and they’re very transparent. All the paint is absolutely transparent, and it’s poured onto a wood panel that’s been prepared and painted white so that the light reflects off of it. This is a very unforgiving process: pouring thick plastic onto wood and letting it dry and then pouring more thick transparent plastic on top of it. There’s no room for a mistakes or corrections really.

And so, I worked from studies. I worked from transparent plastic studies, which take me a very long time to create. So, a lot of the creative process goes on a small scale and the paintings are enlarged versions of these color studies. There are certain things that I want each color study to accomplish visually, and I want that visual experience to call forth all kinds of other intellectual, emotional, spiritual kinds of responses. But it all really starts with a small six by nine inch plastic study.

Really, it also goes back to discoveries that I made when I was an undergraduate at Bennington College. I discovered what was then a really important art movement: Color Field painting. I fell in love with it, and I was encouraged to be experimental. I experimented with acrylic paint and discovered that I just loved thick transparent color and that working with thick transparent colors, sometimes in relationship to opaque color, I felt that I could make discoveries that I hadn’t seen anybody else work with.

A lot of my life as a painter, over almost 50 years, has been about pure color relationships, color in fields, transparency, and materiality.

So that’s sort of an intro to how things get going.

What are the oppositions that you try to balance in your painting process?

What are the oppositions that I try to balance in my painting process? You initially asked me if there were three words that I could choose to describe my painting process and my approach to painting. I kind of bristled or pulled back from that because I don’t think that there are descriptive words that I’d like to use. I feel like there are challenges or oppositions that my painting is involved with and that my whole painting life has been involved with trying to engage.

One of them would be “Shape Versus Field.” This probably sounds very meaningless and like “what’s the difference between shape and field?” But, in fact, it has a very important position in the history of abstraction and particularly abstraction over the last, say 50 years. At a certain point in high modernism in America there was a quality of field in painting that was very important, I would say, from Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock. And then into the pure color painting of color field painters, there was a sense of the painting as being kind of a field of energy or maybe opposing energies or moving energies. But it was kind of anti-shape. It was polyphonic painting where every part of the surface was equally important. It became kind of allover painting (that’s one way to talk about it). But I would say painting as a field that transmits a kind of energy was very important in high modernism.

Then that really fell out of fashion.

Now, some of my favorite painters, let’s say Amy Sillman who is a very wonderful contemporary painter, are very focused on shape and discovering new ways of thinking about shape: shape that’s flat, shape that kind of pushes and pulls in space, etcetera. There’s kind of been a re-emergence of a focus on shape. And I love a lot of that painting. It’s so exciting to me. I think it’s a wonderful moment in abstract painting. There are so many people I could mention who were involved with creating a new feeling of shape, kind of funky, a little bit troubling, a little bit awkward, kind of anti-heroic. I love this painting, but I would say that for me: I’m involved with kind of negotiating that opposition between field and shape and not having one take over from the other. So, “Field and Shape,” and when I say “Field,” I mean color as an energy field, and how do you have an energy field that also has a shape. They don’t really work together, but that’s kind of the ambition and the process and the way of thinking or hoping or approaching a painting or the story I tell myself about what I’m doing. Whether it’s overstated or not, that’s how I talk about it to myself.

Another one is “Color as light / color as matter.” Paint color has two realities. It’s gloppy, expensive stuff you get in jars or tubes or whatever. You mix it and it’s totally material. It’s glop but it’s also light. You put colors together, they vibrate, and you have a quality of light that you can create in a painting. The opposition between those two things, I think, is so key to the magic of painting throughout history and really is a focus of abstract painting. How do you find your way to really give that experience of the material of paint, simultaneously the light quality of paint, and simultaneously the object of a painting, which is a big, heavy thing that’s stuck on a wall. It costs money and takes up space, and it’s very, very material, and how do you have it feel like it is this transcendent light kind of a thing at the same time as you’re not making an illusion? So, that material light thing is a big biggie for me.

A third opposition that I was thinking about: a range of abstract painting as an image because everything, every painting, has an image, and abstract painting as a process of looking, a kind of meditation. I think every painting that’s worth its salt is both: there’s an image that you look at (“Oh yeah! I see that image, I like that image!”), but it’s also a process that engages you in putting it together, as in time with your optical nerves or muscles or whatever works in your eyes, which I don’t really know that much about. It’s a process and it’s also an image.

So those are the things: “Shape versus Field,” “Color in paint versus Material in paint,” and “Image versus Process.” They’re all kind of interrelated, but I think it’s worth it to kind of tease them out.

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News: MUSEUM ACQUISITION | Frederick J. Brown acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, May  6, 2022 - Los Angeles County Museum of Art

MUSEUM ACQUISITION | Frederick J. Brown acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

May 6, 2022 - Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Frederick J. Brown: Acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Frederick J. Brown
Dr. Leon Banks (Study for Last Supper), 1982
Oil on linen
32 x 24 1/4 inches
Signed, dated and titled on verso

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News: GOLDEN Lecture Series | Perle Fine: Out of Exile, May  6, 2022 - The Art Students League

GOLDEN Lecture Series | Perle Fine: Out of Exile

May 6, 2022 - The Art Students League



Perle Fine in her Provincetown Studio, early 1950s. Photo: Maurice Berezov © A.E. Artworks
 
GOLDEN Lecture Series | Perle Fine: Out of Exile
Maddy Berezov, Kathleen L. Housley, and Susan W. Knowles in Conversation
Art Students League, New York
April 28, 2022
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News: The New York Times | Showcasing the Diversity of the South, May  6, 2022 - Claudia Dreifus for The New York Times

The New York Times | Showcasing the Diversity of the South

May 6, 2022 - Claudia Dreifus for The New York Times

Arising from one man’s collection, the Ogden Museum strives to serve a broad audience while showing that Southern art is not merely regional.

NEW ORLEANS — A signature work at a recent exhibit at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art is a photograph of a cellphone showing on its screen the framed image of an antebellum mansion.

It is a photograph within a photograph. But what makes it an eye-catcher is that the pictured iPhone is clearly in the hand of a Black man, RaMell Ross.

Mr. Ross, an Oscar-nominated filmmaker, artist and photographer, often documents the people and land of Hale County, Ala.

Over the decades, some of the giants of Southern photography — Walker Evans, William Eggleston and William Christenberry — have made Hale County their subject. They are, of course, white men. By featuring this particular image, Mr. Ross and the curators of the Ogden are demonstrating their determination to show this place in a new way.

...

Mr. Ogden’s collection was broad. And huge. It documented almost every aspect of Southern art, from the colonial period through the present day. By the 1990s, he said, he owned at least 1,000 paintings, sculptures and photographs.

Among his treasures was a room-size work, a mural really, by the abstract expressionist Ida Kohlmeyer; vibrant scenes from Clementine Hunter, who spent her whole life on a plantation; a Sam Gilliam drape painting, and a work by Julian Onderdonk, a Texas landscape artist famous for his depictions of fields of bluebonnets. There were canvasses rolled up under the beds; the cupboards were full of Sophie Newcomb vases and George Ohr pottery. Continue Reading

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Yahoo News | A Crucial Site of the Abstract Expressionist Movement Was Just Named One of America's Most Endangered Places

May 5, 2022 - Sarah DiMarco for Yahoo News

When you ask art historians and gallerists where the heart of the Abstract Expressionist movement lived, they'll mention New York City a bit, but also point you a bit further east. The quaint East Hampton enclave of Springs is often regarded as a creativity incubator for artists, but one integral spot to the Abstract movement has been long overlooked: the Brooks-Park Arts and Nature Center.

Art couple James Brooks and Charlotte Park settled onto the idyllic, 11-acre parcel in 1954, deeming it as an artistic escape for all, and built a series of studios for creatives to work their magic. In a matter of months, it became the meeting spot for renowned artists such as Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, and Willem de Kooning. Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed the Brooks-Park Arts and Nature Center as one of America's Most Endangered Places in 2022.

For nearly a decade, local activists and art enthusiasts have been fighting to save Brooks' and Park's original home and studios from demolition while raising enough funds to preserve the location as a community landmark. Marietta Gavaris, an activist and painter who currently resides in Springs, believes the restoration of the arts and nature center would both help solidify Springs's mark on the art world and give the residents a place to feel inspired.

"It's one thing to see art hanging in a museum, but when you can explore where it was actually created and how artists interacted with nature, it's an indescribable experience," says Gavaris. "With its 11 acres and the adjoining hiking trails, we want art and nature enthusiasts alike to come to the site and enjoy not only the historic artist impact but just its environment."

Christine Berry, one of the founders of the Berry Campbell Gallery, adds that the site is also crucial in helping to tell the stories of female Expressionists, including that of Charlotte Park. A student of Yale's School of Fine Art and member of the prestigious New York School, Park was instrumental in shaping abstract art as we know it today with her ability to translate lush landscapes into forceful, painterly works. However, as with many other women of the time, her contributions were overshadowed by her male counterparts.

"On paper, Charlotte [Park] had almost the same exact resume as her husband, James [Brooks], and yet, so few people knew about her work," says Berry. "It's only as of late that her name is becoming part of the canon of art history. Her work was not representational in any way, but rather conceptual interpretations of every single day from her beautiful property in the spring."

Her studio at the Brooks-Park Arts and Nature Center stands as an exhibition of her artistic process and solidifies the importance women have in the art world. Though as the years go on, Park's studio—along with the other structures on the campus—deteriorates more and more. Echoes of the site's demolition began in 2013 after the city of East Hampton purchased the land. However, the residents of Springs lobbied together to designate it a town historic landmark in 2014. Since then, Gavaris along with Preservation Long Island and other activists have been actively working with the members of the East Hampton town board to devise a plan that preserves the property and helps it reach its full potential.

Gavaris notes that the major roadblock currently in the town's way of preserving the site is the funding and support. The Brooks-Park Arts and Nature Center asks advocates to sign a petition on their site in support of the restoration of the home and studios of artists James Brooks and Charlotte Park.

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News: James Brooks and Charlotte Park Home and Studios: A Crucial Site of the Abstract Expressionist Movement Was Just Named One of America's Most Endangered Places, May  5, 2022 - Sara DiMarco for Veranda

James Brooks and Charlotte Park Home and Studios: A Crucial Site of the Abstract Expressionist Movement Was Just Named One of America's Most Endangered Places

May 5, 2022 - Sara DiMarco for Veranda

Sara DiMarco for Veranda
View Works by Charlotte Park

"Christine Berry, one of the founders of the Berry Campbell Gallery, adds that the site is also crucial in helping to tell the stories of female Expressionists, including that of Charlotte Park. A student of Yale's School of Fine Art and member of the prestigious New York School, Park was instrumental in shaping abstract art as we know it today with her ability to translate lush landscapes into forceful, painterly works. However, as with many other women of the time, her contributions were overshadowed by her male counterparts"
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News: UPCOMING EVENT | In Conversation: Nanette Carter and Cheryl R. Riley, May  4, 2022 - Berry Campbell

UPCOMING EVENT | In Conversation: Nanette Carter and Cheryl R. Riley

May 4, 2022 - Berry Campbell



In Conversation: Nanette Carter and Cheryl R. Riley
Thursday, May 19, 2022
6 p.m. | Talk Begins 6:30 p.m.
 
In Person at Berry Campbell
530 W 24th Street, New York
 
Streaming Live on Instagram: @BerryCampbell
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News: Hyperallergic | Nanete Carter: Shape Shifting | Your Concise New York Art Guide for May 2022, May  3, 2022 - Cassie Packard for Hyperallergic

Hyperallergic | Nanete Carter: Shape Shifting | Your Concise New York Art Guide for May 2022

May 3, 2022 - Cassie Packard for Hyperallergic

Your Concise New York Art Guide for May 2022

Your list of must-see, fun, insightful, and very New York art events this month, including Willie Cole, Hélio Oiticica, Nanette Carter, and more.

When: through May 27
Where: Berry Campbell (530 West 24th Street, Chelsea, Manhattan)

Nanette Carter first encountered Mylar in architectural drawings in the mid-1980s. Since then, frosted Mylar sheets have become the artist’s medium of choice, as she constructs cantilevered collages by painting and printing directly onto irregular shapes cut from the material. This show of recent collages, including sweeping examples from the artist’s Destabilizing and Shifting Perspectives series, hammers home that Carter is not only a painter concerned with color, texture, and dynamism but also a builder with an interest in balance, weight, and gravity.

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News: Martha Campbell and Christine Berry at the 2022 New York School of Interior Design Gala honoring Jamie Drake., May  3, 2022

Martha Campbell and Christine Berry at the 2022 New York School of Interior Design Gala honoring Jamie Drake.

May 3, 2022

Martha Campbell and Christine Berry at the 2022 New York School of Interior Design Gala honoring Jamie Drake. 

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News: Stephen Pace and Lynne Drexler featured in "Farnsworth Forward: The Collection" at the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine, May  1, 2022 - Farnsworth Art Museum

Stephen Pace and Lynne Drexler featured in "Farnsworth Forward: The Collection" at the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine

May 1, 2022 - Farnsworth Art Museum



Farnsworth Forward: The Collection
Curated by Suzette McAvoy
Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine
Through December 31, 2022

Featuring work by Stephen Pace, Lynne Mapp Drexler, George Bellows, Lois Dodd, Winslow Homer, Daniel Minter, and Marguerite Zorach.

View Works by Stephen Pace
Lynne Mapp Drexler: Solo Exhibition Forthcoming at Berry Campbell, New York

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News: Jill Nathanson , April 25, 2022 - Karen Wilkin for The Hopkins Review

Jill Nathanson

April 25, 2022 - Karen Wilkin for The Hopkins Review

Karen Wilkin for The Hopkins Review, Winter 2022
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News: Artblog | Nanette Carter’s journey as artist, educator, and Anonymous was a Woman award winner, April 16, 2022 - Susan Isaacs for Artblog

Artblog | Nanette Carter’s journey as artist, educator, and Anonymous was a Woman award winner

April 16, 2022 - Susan Isaacs for Artblog

Susan Isaacs interviews artist Nanette Carter, whose journey includes years as an art educator, as well as 17 years as a full time professional artist sustaining herself through sales of her work. An amazing story. Nanette Carter is featured in a 2-person exhibit at Towson University now through April 23. Be sure to catch it is you’re in the Baltimore area.

Master artist Nanette Carter focuses on contemporary issues with an abstract vocabulary of form, line, color, and texture that explore the impact of social media, social injustice, and the balancing of life responsibilities in the 21st century through painted mylar collages. Her recent retirement from teaching has given her time to make much new work and have three exhibitions in 2022 following on a major survey of 30 years of work in 2021 at the N’Namdi Contemporary in Detroit, MI.

Nanette Carter: I went to Pratt for my graduate degree, and I majored in printmaking and minored in drawing. And so, a lot of that, of course, is still reflected in the work. I taught for 20 years at Pratt and enjoyed it immensely. The students are smart. They’re talented. I would always tell them “I probably learned, just as much from you, as you have from me.” They come from all over the world; it’s quite international so it made for a wonderful experience, I think, for everyone in the classroom.

I received several faculty grants during the course of that time. One of the grants, in fact, was able to send me to Cuba in 2018. I had a solo show there and we actually created a catalog with that money. I brought art materials and taught a class. The year before I left Pratt, I received what they call the Sienna Art Institute Residency, which is a collaboration with the Institute in Italy and Pratt. Because of Covid the year that I was supposed to go had to be pushed to the next year, so my very last year at Pratt I went to Sienna for six weeks. It was there that I heard that I was up for the Anonymous was a Woman, and they asked me to please send my images and I had to write a little piece on my work and what it’s been like the last 40-50 years. What I think is so amazing about this grant is that it is really aimed at artists who’ve been out here for some time, but maybe have not been acknowledged or recognized in the fashion that they should be. And so I applied and then I heard that I received that grant. The timing couldn’t have been better to receive the money when I was retiring. And I felt very good leaving and I had great memories, and I learned so much from the faculty. They are amazing artists. I am still in contact with them, and probably will be for the rest of my life. We get together and go to each other studios, which is always so much fun and very helpful.

SI: You are now with the Berry Campbell Gallery.

NCBerry Campbell approached me, which is always nice, you know when someone wants you. I love the two women running the space—Christine Berry and Martha Campbell. They are a force to be reckoned with. These women are working hard; there are an awful lot of women artists with the gallery.

SI: In fact, the gallery has a bit of a connection to Philadelphia because they represent the Elizabeth Osborne estate now, and she was a teacher of mine at PAFA and a very well-known artist from Philadelphia. A lot of artists are teachers. Did you always want to teach or was teaching a way to make a living?

NC: Well, you know when I went to Oberlin College for my undergraduate studies, I knew then that I was going to teach. And I in fact took some education classes. I had done some teaching in the summer. I used to have the summer job working at the parks in Montclair, New Jersey, and I would do the arts and crafts. I did that in the summer, while I was at Oberlin College, and so I knew I wanted to teach. I come from a home of teachers. My mother taught first grade where of course reading is so important. She ended becoming a reading specialist, and she went back to school and ended up becoming a vice principal. My father got his doctorate in divinity. He never had a church, but I can tell you, for Black men, if you wanted to get into politics, you almost had to go through the Church. We can think of Martin Luther King, Jesse Jackson, and Ralph Abernathy. Several of these men ended up going into politics, via the Church. The Baptist Church, in particular. So Dad got into politics. But as a preacher politician, you are also teaching and helping others. It’s that kind of service, that public service, that I think is so important.

I can recall when I went off to Oberlin a lot of my parents’ friends said “Oh my gosh you’re letting your daughter major in art. How is she going to make a living?” My mother would always reply, “Oh no she will teach.” When I went to prepare for my MFA I understood then, okay now I can possibly even teach on the college level. Continue Reading

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News: Frank Wimberley Inducted into the Guild Hall Academy of the Arts, April 14, 2022 - Guild Hall Museum

Frank Wimberley Inducted into the Guild Hall Academy of the Arts

April 14, 2022 - Guild Hall Museum

Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York

2022 Inductees:
Barry Bergdoll, Renee Cox, Cornelius Eady, Bran Ferren, RoseLee Goldberg, Rashid Johnson, Erik Larson, Robert Longo, Julianne Moore, Questlove, Ugo Rondinone, Frank Wimberley, Lucy Winton
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News: Christine Berry and Martha Campbell at the 2022 ARTTABLE Annual Benefit & Award Ceremony , April 14, 2022

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell at the 2022 ARTTABLE Annual Benefit & Award Ceremony

April 14, 2022

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell at the 2022 ARTTABLE Annual Benefit & Award Ceremony honoring Carol Cole Levin and Dr. Nicole R. Fleetwood. 

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News: Lilian Thomas Burwell Recieves a Lifetime Achievement Award from Howard University, April  8, 2022 - Howard University, Washington, D.C.

Lilian Thomas Burwell Recieves a Lifetime Achievement Award from Howard University

April 8, 2022 - Howard University, Washington, D.C.

32nd Annual James A. Porter Colloquium on African American Art and Art of the African Diaspora, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
 
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News: Artnet News | She Painted for Decades in Obscurity on a Remote Island in Maine. Suddenly, Collectors Can’t Get Enough of Lynne Drexler, April  1, 2022 - Katya Kazakina for Artnet News

Artnet News | She Painted for Decades in Obscurity on a Remote Island in Maine. Suddenly, Collectors Can’t Get Enough of Lynne Drexler

April 1, 2022 - Katya Kazakina for Artnet News

Drexler sold art to tourists for $50. Earlier this month, one of her paintings fetched over $1 million at Christie's.

What is going on there?

That’s the question market observers asked after a vibrant abstract canvas painted six decades ago by little-known artist Lynne Drexler soared to $1.2 million at a Christie’s off-season auction last month. More than 16 bidders propelled the work to 12 times its presale estimate of $40,000 to $60,000. 

The price was mind-boggling for an artist who lived most of her life in obscurity, overshadowed, like many women of her generation, by a husband. She never had much of a career, showing here and there but rarely in New York City, whose hustle and bustle she eventually traded for the austere beauty of Monhegan, a small, rocky island off the coast of Maine. 

There, amid harsh winters and touristy summers, Drexler spent her last 16 years painting daily, listening to the opera on the radio, and holding court at Jack Daniels-fueled salons. In the process, she filled her rickety white house with countless canvases. Her most inventive body of work—ecstatic abstracts created from torrents of vibrant brushstrokes, small and precise—was only discovered after her death, in 1999.

A second-generation Abstract Expressionist, Drexler’s star is rising as the contribution of female artists is being written back into the mainstream canon of art history (and the art market). The past few years have seen new records for Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Alma Thomas, and Helen Frankenthaler, as well as Yayoi Kusama and Agnes Martin. 

Drexler’s posthumous rise serves as a riposte to the idea that there are no more artists left to “rediscover.” Those who knew her just wish she could have been here to see it.

Before 2020, none of Drexler’s paintings had sold at auction for $10,000, let alone $1 million. 

Something started to change that year, when a 1966 green painting fetched a quadruple-estimate $26,000 at Barridoff Auction in Portland, Maine. Since then, her work has consistently fetched five- and six-figure sums; most recently, $150,000 for PinKing 1970 at Barridoff on March 19. One of her paintings is now in the collection of John Legend and Chrissy Teigen.

“These women of the 20th century, who are related to the second movement of Abstract Expressionism, were so undervalued and under-circulated that it almost became a tempest when they started to be recognized,” said Michael Rancourt, who manages the Drexler estate, who has never before spoken to the press. Along with figures like Grace Hartigan and Yvonne Thomas, “Lynne is fortunate to be part of it.”

The record-setting Christie’s painting, Flowered Hundred (1962), was deaccessioned by the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine. “It’s terrific that she’s finally getting her due,” said Christopher Brownawell, the museum’s director. 

Drexler was born in 1928 in Newport News, Virginia and remained a Southern lady until her death. “She could curse like a pirate, but she judged people by their manners,’’ a friend recalled in a catalogue essay.

After attending the College of William and Mary, she came to New York in the 1950s to study with Robert Motherwell at Hunter College. She also took studio art classes with Hans Hofmann. She lived in the Chelsea Hotel and shared her downtown studio with painter Seymour Boardman. 

In the early 1960s, she married fellow artist John Hultberg, whose large-scale Surrealist compositions won him the support of legendary gallerist Martha Jackson. She placed his works in top museums, paid for his (and Drexler’s) art supplies, and bought him a house on Monhegan Island, according to curator Tralice Bracy. 

Jackson wasn’t particularly interested in Drexler’s work. “She wasn’t acknowledged as a painter, certainly not as a great painter,” Rancourt said. “She was the child in the corner, basically.”  

Anita Shapolsky, a veteran New York art dealer, met Drexler while visiting Hultberg on the island in the early 1980s. She was unaware of Drexler’s Ab Ex phase. “She was a little angry at life,” Shapolsky recalled. “There were marital problems. At the time she was doing small paper pictures of nature for the tourists who came to the island.” Continue Reading

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News: Nanette Carter: Almond's Artists and Writers Dinner , March 28, 2022

Nanette Carter: Almond's Artists and Writers Dinner

March 28, 2022

Nanette Carter: Almond's Artist and Writers Dinner 
Almond Restaurant, Bridgehampton, New York
View Works by Nanette Carter

 

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News: Architecture Sarasota Honors Gene Leedy With an Exhibit and Tour, March 25, 2022 - Kim Doleatto for Sarasota Magazine

Architecture Sarasota Honors Gene Leedy With an Exhibit and Tour

March 25, 2022 - Kim Doleatto for Sarasota Magazine

Architect Max Strang will guide a tour of Leedy’s architecture and share intimate stories about his time with the legendary architect

Gene Leedy, a founding father of the Sarasota School of Architecture, led a long and decorated career in midcentury modern architecture and beyond. He’ll be celebrated with a weekend tour of his work which will also kick off a three-week-long Leedy-focused exhibition. The event is led by Architecture Sarasota, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the Sarasota School of Architecture style.

Although the bulk of Leedy’s work is in Winter Haven, Florida, where, in 1954, he moved his practice, Leedy started his career in Sarasota and left a lasting legacy.

At just 16 years old, he enrolled at the University of Florida and graduated with a degree in architecture. He then moved to Sarasota and worked under the tutelage of Paul Rudolph, an internationally acclaimed architect and a founder of the Sarasota School of Architecture style that emerged in the 1940s. Also called Sarasota Modern, the style is known for its Florida-sensitive design that often incorporates what were at the time avant-garde elements, like sliding floor-to-ceiling glass doors, roof overhangs to increase shade and expansive living areas that encouraged air circulation before many homes had air conditioning. It was a mindset that nurtured innovations in engineering, displayed in Leedy’s approach to his projects.

He’s best known for his use of precast concrete and double-T shaped beams, at the time engineering marvels that allowed for strong, lofty, large spaces like the 9,000-square-foot president’s residence at the University of South Florida in Tampa he designed in 1990. Leedy applied the same new wave of thinking when it came to his residential works.

“He designed modular and scalable homes that could easily be added to, so a couple could have a starter home that could grow. Some of his houses are still on Drexel Avenue in Winter Haven,” says Architecture Sarasota executive director Anne-Marie Russell. “Many still don’t have air conditioning  because they worked so well with his passive system for shading and cooling.”

In Sarasota, Leedy designed Brentwood Elementary School in 1958, the House for Contemporary Builders in 1950 and two residential projects. One of them, the Solomon Residence & Studio, on Big Pass on Siesta Key, was built in 1970 and will be highlighted at the exhibition.

Syd Solomon was an abstract painter, and the home served as the site of Sarasota’s “beach culturati,” a subtropical salon where artists, writers, intellectuals, scientists and playwrights gathered. “That house became the location of Sarasota’s brain trust and shows how great architecture can create a platform for creativity,” says Russell. “It did what great architecture always does—inspires new ways of thinking, being and living.” Continue Reading

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News: ‘Touch The Earth Lightly’: Brooks-Park House, Studios Sit At Crossroads Of Preservation, Or Demolition, March 25, 2022 - Bryan Boyhan for Southampton Press

‘Touch The Earth Lightly’: Brooks-Park House, Studios Sit At Crossroads Of Preservation, Or Demolition

March 25, 2022 - Bryan Boyhan for Southampton Press

James Brooks and his wife, Charlotte Park, once walked to work each day — from the back of their shingled cottage, the screen door of the porch closing behind them, along a 100-yard-long path edged in moss that connected their tiny home in the woods of Springs with a pair of studios where they both painted.

The floor of the 11 acres of scrub oak forest that surrounded them was flecked with bits of grass, dry leaves and more moss, a thick canopy of green overhead in the summer. By winter, the naked limbs of the trees cast abstract shadows on the ground that looked as if they could have leapt off the canvas of one of their paintings.

In the spring and fall, as the seasons changed, Park would have taken note of the evolution of plants and flowers in the landscape, and commented on the birds passing through, nesting or migrating. She made careful and thorough observations of the natural world around her, noted in dozens of journals she kept over the decades she lived in Springs — from walks in the woods, outside her studio, or watching out the windows from the house that had once been a fisherman’s shack, all of it subtly informing her soft and warm canvases.

Meanwhile, on the floor of his self-designed studio — with its jagged roof line and flood of natural light — Brooks worked on his monumental paintings, conjuring lines and forms and pools of color.

Together, he and Park created some of the art that helped define the nascent abstract expressionist movement in America and established Springs as an outpost of creative thought in the wilds of the East End.

But today, those buildings — the house, two studios and another outbuilding used as guest quarters — are boarded up, some with tarps on their roofs to keep out the rain and snow. Parts are in danger of collapsing in on themselves. When the Town of East Hampton acquired the 11 acres as open space back in 2013, the intention was to simply knock down the buildings that stood there. Continue Reading

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News: Martha Campbell with clients at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Art Fair , March 25, 2022

Martha Campbell with clients at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Art Fair

March 25, 2022

Martha Campbell with clients at Palm Beach Modern + Contemporary Art Fair. 

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News: The Art Scene 03.24.22: Palm Beach Modern, March 24, 2022 - Mark Segal for the East Hampton Star

The Art Scene 03.24.22: Palm Beach Modern

March 24, 2022 - Mark Segal for the East Hampton Star

Palm Beach Modern
Chelsea’s Berry Campbell Gallery is attending the Palm Beach Modern and Contemporary art fair from today through Monday with a roster heavy with artists who have worked on the East End.

The gallery’s booth has work by the modern artists Mary Abbott, Alice Baber, Dan Christensen, John Ferren, Perle Fine, Grace Hartigan, Syd Solomon, Theodoros Stamos, and Esteban Vicente, and the contemporary practitioners Eric Dever, Susan Vecsey, and Frank Wimberley.

Preview Booth
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News: Treasures from the Vault: Yvonne Thomas, March 24, 2022 - Lauren Wolfer, Associate Curator of Special Collections & Archives for Articulate

Treasures from the Vault: Yvonne Thomas

March 24, 2022 - Lauren Wolfer, Associate Curator of Special Collections & Archives for Articulate

By Lauren Wolfer, Associate Curator of Special Collections & Archives for Articulate
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News: The Art Scene 03.17.22, March 17, 2022 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

The Art Scene 03.17.22

March 17, 2022 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Charlotte Park in Chelsea
"Charlotte Park: Works on Paper From the 1950s" opens Thursday at Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea and will continue through April 23. 

For Park, working on paper gave her considerable freedom. Her monochrome palette of the early '50s enabled her to focus on form. She reintroduced color into her art in the middle of the decade, evolving a lyrical style in which suggestions of the natural world appear. 

Park united painting and drawing throughout the decade, creating a vocabulary featuring clustered loops, black curvilinear forms, and anatomical suggestions, but figurative elements were either suppressed or diffused.

In the late '50s, Park and her husband, the painter James Brooks, relocated from Montauk to an 11-acre parcel in Springs that the Town of East Hampton acquired in 2013. A committee of community members is working to have the structures renovated and the site preserved as an art and nature center.

Preview Exhibition
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News: Eric Dever: Artist in Residence , March 13, 2022

Eric Dever: Artist in Residence

March 13, 2022

Eric Dever: Artist in Residence 
Parrish Art Musesum, Water Mill, New York
March 13 - April 24, 2022
View Works by Eric Dever

 
"A 65-year tradition celebrating youthful creativity, the program was enhanced by this year’s artist-in-residence Eric Dever, who led workshops with more than 250 students. A 54-foot-long collaborative mural created during the residency, a video demonstration of the process by Dever, plus original works by the artist will also be on view."

 

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News: UPCOMING EVENT: Nanette Carter Speaking at Towson University Center for the Arts Gallery, March  2, 2022 - Towson University

UPCOMING EVENT: Nanette Carter Speaking at Towson University Center for the Arts Gallery

March 2, 2022 - Towson University

Center for the Arts Gallery
Towson University
7700 Osler Drive, Towson, Maryland
6:30 - 7:15 pm

More Information

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News: Parrish Art Museum | Creative Studio: Sky, Earth and Water | Meaning in Landscape with Eric Dever, February 23, 2022 - Parrish Art Museum

Parrish Art Museum | Creative Studio: Sky, Earth and Water | Meaning in Landscape with Eric Dever

February 23, 2022 - Parrish Art Museum

Join artist Eric Dever at this Creative Studio for Adults and Teens to create landscapes using mixed media and collage. Artists highlighted will be Peter Campus, Jane Wilson, Jane Freilicher, Fairfield Porter and Robert Dash.

March 5, 2022
1 pm - 3 pm
Register

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News: Now Representing Elizabeth Osborne (b. 1936), February 10, 2022 - Berry Campbell

Now Representing Elizabeth Osborne (b. 1936)

February 10, 2022 - Berry Campbell

Now Representing Elizabeth Osborne (b. 1936)
Solo Exhibition Forthcoming September 2022

View Works by Elizabeth Osborne
View Bio and CV

ABOUT THE ARTIST
A ghostly figure looking out from a doorway; actual windshield wipers positioned over a painted car window; vividly clothed, sensuous figures posed in sparse rooms; land and sky betraying no brushstrokes, horizons to infinity; supernaturally precise still lifes that stop time; charged explorations of the painter’s studio, the past asserting itself in mirrors; vivid bands of light and color echoing the sounds of the cosmos. Few artists of Elizabeth Osborne’s generation have explored as wide a range of subject matter. Driven by curiosity and an unwillingness to repeat herself, Osborne has frequently shifted working methods to support new directions. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Osborne has been at the center of its art world, a critical figure integral to the city’s cultural identity as an educator and as an innovator in her studio. Her art bears the impact of her time in Philadelphia but transcends place, running with multiple streams of modernism and post-war painting.

Osborne had a progressive Quaker education at Friends Central School near the original site of the Barnes Foundation. Two mentors in her childhood, Louis W. Flaccus and Hobson Pittman, supported her early drive and talent in art. Flaccus, a family friend, was a professor of Philosophy and amateur painter; Pittman was a professional artist who taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) and at Friends Central. Both men encouraged Osborne to defy societal expectations of young women and to trust her passion and instincts for a career in art. Osborne took advantage of everything that Philadelphia offered a young artist. She visited galleries, museums, and took additional classes outside of her school week at the Philadelphia Museum College (now University of the Arts) with painter Neil Welliver. Surviving work from this period shows that Osborne was quick to understand observational drawing, grasping the nuances of form and the emotional capacity of line and color.

These relationships grounded Osborne as she endured a series of traumatic losses during childhood and into her teens. Her father Charles died from leukemia in 1945. Three years later her mother, Virginia, killed herself by overdosing on pills. Osborne and her siblings, including an older brother and a twin sister, were left to be raised by Virginia’s brother and wife. In 1954 while painting a portrait of her grandfather, he revealed that her biological father was the architect, Paul Philippe Cret (1876-1945), who had died the same year as Charles Osborne, further illuminating the impact of loss on her mother. In 1955 her twin sister Anne killed herself while Osborne was traveling in France on a fellowship. These tragedies have resurfaced in her work throughout her career in unexpected ways – as figures who seem to be mirages, objects intimately observed but separated from one another as though unknowable. Osborne has reflected on the impact of grief on her work and how it affected her figure paintings:

"My work really was affected for a while by the loss of loved ones, of the presence of death…In the figurative paintings there’s probably this connection with longing and missing my sister in the solitary figures and the darkness with figures emerging and receding…Losing people is imprinted…there is a natural impulse to have these people back. They disappear from your sight, your life but they reappear when you try to go to sleep at night."[1]

By 1954 Osborne had entered PAFA while simultaneously working towards a BFA at the University of Pennsylvania. At the time, PAFA was a mixture of progressive instructors and conservative academics resistant to many modernist developments of the previous half century. Founded in 1805 and the first museum and art school in the United States, it was an immersive experience for art students, offering a rich permanent collection and annual exhibitions of contemporary American art. Among her instructors were experimental figure painter Ben Kamihira, abstract artist Jimmy Leuders, realists Francis Speight and Walter Stuempfig, and traditional modernist Franklin Watkins. Osborne’s training encompassed working from life models, drawing from casts and still life set ups, and other rigorous beaux-arts-based pedagogy. She maintains that her most fruitful relationships and education came through the camaraderie between friends and fellow students including Raymond Saunders. Continue Reading

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News: 13 contemporary art galleries to visit led by powerful women, February 10, 2022 - Julie Chang Murphy for Dandelion Chandelier

13 contemporary art galleries to visit led by powerful women

February 10, 2022 - Julie Chang Murphy for Dandelion Chandelier

Change continues to transform the world of contemporary art, with more and more women – including women of color – launching galleries of their own. Our correspondent Julie Chang Murphy has curated a list of 13 influential contemporary art galleries owned or led by powerful women that you can visit right now in New York, Chicago, Paris and more, including three new galleries in NYC recently opened and either owned or led by Black women.

13 influential contemporary art galleries owned or led by powerful women
The art world — despite a reputation for being inherently counter-culture and progressive — suffers from much of the same gender inequality as other traditionally male-dominated industries. Women remain dramatically underrepresented and undervalued in museums, galleries, and auction houses.

9. Berry Campbell
The co-founders of Chelsea’s Berry Campbell Gallery, Christine Berry and Martha Campbell, are kindred spirits. According to their website, “both studied art history in college, began their careers in the museum world, and later worked together at a major gallery in midtown Manhattan.” They opened their gallery in 2013, later doubling the size of their space.

Their curatorial vision is to shine a light on postwar American modernist artists who were left behind due to race, gender, or geography. And there are many unsung and little-known artists who created brilliant abstractions. Including Syd Solomon, Frederick J. Brown, Lilian Thomas Burwell and Frank Wimberley, all of whom are represented by Berry Campbell.

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News: Upcoming Event | Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center | Eric Dever: Nature into Art, February  1, 2022 - Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

Upcoming Event | Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center | Eric Dever: Nature into Art

February 1, 2022 - Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

NATURE INTO ART
With guest artist Eric Dever
Thursday, February 17, 4:00-5:00 PM EST

REGISTER

 

 

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News: Upcoming Event | Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center | Mike Solomon: The Language of Abstraction, February  1, 2022 - Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

Upcoming Event | Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center | Mike Solomon: The Language of Abstraction

February 1, 2022 - Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

THE LANGUAGE OF ABSTRACTION
With guest artist Mike Solomon
Thursday, February 10, 4:00-5:00 PM ES

REGISTER

 

 

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News: MUSEUM EXHIBITION | Forms Follow Function: The Art of Nanette Carter, Hunterdon Art Museum, January 24, 2022 - Hunterdon Art Museum

MUSEUM EXHIBITION | Forms Follow Function: The Art of Nanette Carter, Hunterdon Art Museum

January 24, 2022 - Hunterdon Art Museum

Forms Follow Function: The Art of Nanette Carter
The Hunterdon Art Musuem, Clinton, New Jersey
January 23 - April 24, 2022

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News: Larry Zox | Finding Beauty in the Abstract at the Rollins Museum of Art, January 22, 2022 - Flamino Magazine

Larry Zox | Finding Beauty in the Abstract at the Rollins Museum of Art

January 22, 2022 - Flamino Magazine

Sometimes it’s easy to overlook the beauty in simplicity. The way the sun slices bright lines through the treetops on a sunny day or looking out the window of an airplane to peer down at the homes standing like soldiers in neat rows and grids. The lines, colors and shapes that turn the world around us into a masterpiece are rarely given more than a glance, but in a new exhibit at the Rollins Museum of Art in Winter Park, these simple phenomena take center stage.

In Line, Color, Shapes, and Other Storiesvisitors get the chance to explore the museum’s collection of abstract art spanning from the early 20th century to 2013. The 17 works pulled from the Rollins Museum’s permanent collection all use geometric abstraction to explore the artmaking process. Visitors won’t find any Edgar Degas paintings of ballerinas at the barre or sculptures of Greek gods posing in triumph at this exhibit. In fact, they won’t find any figures at all. Instead, they’ll enter a world dictated by the satisfaction of a straight line, the mingling of shapes and the dueling of colors on canvas, sculptures and prints.

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News: Larry Zox | Line, Color, Shapes, and Other Stories at the Rollins Museum of Art, Winter Park, Florida, January 22, 2022 - Rollins MUseum of Art

Larry Zox | Line, Color, Shapes, and Other Stories at the Rollins Museum of Art, Winter Park, Florida

January 22, 2022 - Rollins MUseum of Art

Line, Color, Shapes, and Other Stories
Abstract Art Selections from the Permanent Collection
January 15 - April 3, 2022

View Exhibition

This exhibition features a selection of works from the museum's collection of modern and contemporary art that explores abstraction as a central theme. Although non-figural, these works contain a multiplicity of stories about art making, each one revealing the artist’s vision, process, experience, and the historical context in which they worked. When considered together, the selection speaks to the heterogeneous approaches to abstraction and their art historical significance. Works by Monir Farmanfarmaian, Carmen Herrera, Doris Leeper, Jakow Telischewski, and Larry Zox, among others, emphasize the universal appeal of the structural elements of representation: line, color, and shape.

The exhibition establishes a dialogue with From Chaos to Order: Greek Geometric Art from the Sol Rabin Collection on view in the adjacent gallery, which examines the idea of geometry and balance as signifiers of beauty and harmony in ancient Greece. Line, Color, Shapes, and Other Stories includes works in various media—paintings, prints, and sculptures; the installation highlights the output of creators who prioritized the non-representational in favor of a pure and direct experience with material and form. This exhibition is organized by the Rollins Museum of Art.

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News: Galleriesnow: The Weekender | Our weekly pick of the best exhibitions in Hong Kong, New York, Zürich, London, Paris, Berlin, Los Angeles: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed, January 14, 2022 - Galleriesnow

Galleriesnow: The Weekender | Our weekly pick of the best exhibitions in Hong Kong, New York, Zürich, London, Paris, Berlin, Los Angeles: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed

January 14, 2022 - Galleriesnow

Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed
Berry Campbell, New York

newly discovered materials from the artist’s archive detail how his World War II camouflage designs and other early graphic art skills were key to his unique approach to Abstract Expressionism

More Information

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News: NYC-ARTS Top Five Picks: January 7-January 13 | Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed, January  8, 2022 - NYC-ARTS

NYC-ARTS Top Five Picks: January 7-January 13 | Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed

January 8, 2022 - NYC-ARTS

NYC-Arts Top Five Picks: January 7 – January 13



Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed
Thu, Jan 06, 2022 - Sat, Feb 05, 2022

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News: Frank Wimberley | The Art Scene 12.23.21, December 30, 2021 - Mark Segal

Frank Wimberley | The Art Scene 12.23.21

December 30, 2021 - Mark Segal

Encountering the Parrish
“Encounters: Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection,” an exhibition of work by nine contemporary artists with deep connections to the East End, is on view at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill through Feb. 27.

New works by Barthelemy Toguo and Tomashi Jackson were created for their solo shows at the Parrish. Mr. Toguo’s “Homo Planta A” reflects his interest in nature and sustainability, while Ms. Jackson’s “The Three Sisters” was inspired by interviews with members of local indigenous, Black, and Latinx communities.

Darlene Charneco, Esly E. Escobar, Laurie Lambrecht, and Candace Hill Montgomery developed their works for Parrish Road Show exhibitions. Ms. Charneco’s work considered the symbiotic co-evolution of insects and plants, while Mr. Escobar dripped paint on a canvas until a character was revealed.

Ms. Lambrecht’s piece is one of a series of print and fiber works inspired by the Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack. Ms. Montgomery’s weaving, first shown at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum, examines the #MeToo movement.

Rachel Feinstein’s interest in the Rococo inspired her plaster sculpture “See You Soon,” while Sara VanDerBeek’s abstract photographs were motivated in part by members of the Bauhaus weaving workshop, quilts, and Pre-Colombian textiles and ceramics.

Frank Wimberley’s “Wrinkles” (1994) is one of his tactile, multilayered abstract paintings, which he has described as “absolutely personal and universal.”

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News: "Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed" Exhibition Catalogue, December 21, 2021 - Berry Campbell

"Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed" Exhibition Catalogue

December 21, 2021 - Berry Campbell



Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed is accompanied by a 96-page hardcover catalogue with 28 color plates, with essays by Michael Auping, former Chief Curator at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and curator of recent exhibitions of Frank Stella and Mark Bradford, Dr. Gail Levin, expert on Lee Krasner and Edward Hopper, George Bolge, Director Emeriti of the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida and the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Florida, and Mike Solomon, artist and the artist’s son.

$49.95 + tax, shipping and handling
 
Email info@berrycampbell.com to purchase
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News: Upcoming Event | Bentley Brown: Framing, Self-Positioning, and Storytelling in African American Art at the Hudson River Museum, New York, December 10, 2021 - Hudson River Museum

Upcoming Event | Bentley Brown: Framing, Self-Positioning, and Storytelling in African American Art at the Hudson River Museum, New York

December 10, 2021 - Hudson River Museum

Join art historian Bentley Brown for a walk through African American Art in the 20th Century to discuss the importance of how African American artists have framed the narratives in which they see themselves through medium, context, and storytelling throughout the twentieth century. In the course of this conversational tour, Brown will make a special stop at the signature work, John Henry, an imposing 1979 oil painting by his father, Frederick Brown.

Bentley Brown is a multidisciplinary artist, curator, and doctoral student at The Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. His research at the Institute explores the pioneering role of Black artists and Black creative spaces within New York City’s contemporary art movements of the late 1960s through the mid 1980s. In his artistic practice, Brown uses the mediums of canvas, found objects, photo-collage, and film to explore themes of Black identity, cosmology, and American interculturalism.

Saturday, December 11, 2021
1pm
More information

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News: Frederick J. Brown | Three Must-See Art Exhibits in New York that Are Just Right for this Holiday Season, December  6, 2021 - Maria Lisella for VNY La Voce di New York

Frederick J. Brown | Three Must-See Art Exhibits in New York that Are Just Right for this Holiday Season

December 6, 2021 - Maria Lisella for VNY La Voce di New York

 

This year, when giving holiday gifts, skip the gift cards, the Amazon Prime products and deals and think way outside that digital, impersonal box, give and share a LIVE experience instead.  Let others jam malls and run around frenzied looking for the “perfect” anything, just dial up a museum, or book timed tickets online, knowing capacity is limited and museums are not jammed just before the holidays.

Accompanying a niece, nephew, cousin, or friend to an exhibit will stay with the giftee. Selfies taken in front of that Mondrian or Chagall, Matisse or Richard Mayhew and Felrath Hines or Sol LeWitt are certain to outlast flashy yoga wear, a tushy spa warmer, or a reinvented shower cap.

A trio of manageable museums are currently exhibiting some of the most talked about work in town: the Hudson River Museum, the Jewish Museum, and the Morgan Library and Museum are three off-the beaten track venues for pint-sized immersions in carefully cultivated and curated shows.

The Hudson River Museum is the fifth and final venue to host this impressive and wide-ranging collection African American Art in the 20th Centurywhich brings one of the most significant national collections of African American art to Yonkers. Featuring some of the country’s most famous Black artists–it was drawn from the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum–the exhibit features paintings and sculptures by 34 artists who came to prominence during the period bracketed by the Harlem Renaissance starting in the 1920s, the civil rights movement in the 1960s, and beyond.

In addition to Romare Bearden, artists include Frederick Brown, Beauford Delaney, Jacob Lawrence, Loïs Mailou Jones and Renée Stout, whose work ranges in style from portraiture to modern abstraction, to the postmodern assemblage of found objects.

Move from the galleries to the Planetarium or consider the Glenview Holiday Tour, the Gilded Age mansion that abuts the museum featuring Yonkers’ favorite dollhouse, Nybelwyck Hall. For a virtual experience, consider the Studio Tour and Demonstration with Jamel Robinson on Jan. 12 at the artist in his own studio.

https://www.hrm.org/
Open Thursday through Sunday, 12-5 pm

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News: Frederick J. Brown | Museum showcases retrospective of African American art, November 25, 2021 - Jackie Lupo for The Rivertowns Enterprise

Frederick J. Brown | Museum showcases retrospective of African American art

November 25, 2021 - Jackie Lupo for The Rivertowns Enterprise

The Hudson River Museum is presenting an important survey exhibition, “African American Art in the 20th Century,” that was organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and includes 43 objects from their permanent collection. 

The show, on display through Jan. 16, 2022, presents paintings and sculpture by 34 African American artists who became famous in the decades between the Harlem Renaissance and the civil rights movement. The works reflect the artists’ responses to the evolving international aesthetic movements of the 20th century, as seen through the lens of race in America. As one of these artists, Jacob Lawrence, said in 1951, “My pictures express my life and experience… the things I have experienced extend to my national, racial and class group. I paint the American scene.”

HRM director and CEO Masha Turchinsky called the Smithsonian’s collection “one of the most significant national collections of African American art. This is a pivotal opportunity for the public to experience powerful works by these American luminaries at the exhibition’s only New York venue.”

The African American experience as shown by these artists embraced both rural and urban life. 

In 1940, William H. Johnson, a native of South Carolina, painted “Sowing” in oil on burlap. He used brilliant colors and the naive style characteristic of many of his paintings of country life in the South in the early 20th century.

But the rural South could also be inhospitable for Black people. At first glance, Norman Lewis’ 1962 “Evening Rendezvous” seems largely abstract. Blink, and a sinister scene appears: a crowd of white-hooded Klansmen milling around a red-hot fire. According to the Smithsonian’s label for this painting, the abstract-art-obsessed critics of the time debated whether Lewis meant to make a political statement with this painting.

Frederick Brown chose John Henry, a freed slave who was a hero of American folklore and protest music, as the subject for his 1979 oil painting. Brown himself grew up near the steel mills of South Chicago, and his portrayal of Henry is a comment on the contemporary concerns of American laborers.

Cities figured prominently in the Black exodus from the South, but life wasn’t always easier there. The artistic trope of the “portrait of an artist in his studio” is turned on its head in Palmer Hayden’s 1930 oil, “The Janitor Who Paints.” A Black janitor, whose basement apartment is strewn with the tools of his maintenance trade, takes a break from that job to don a jaunty beret, as he goes to his easel to work on a portrait of a mother and child. In real life, Hayden had to support himself as a janitor in order to paint, as did a friend and fellow artist, Cloyd Boykin. 

The inner city is also the setting for Beauford Delaney’s 1946 oil painting, “Can Fire in the Park.” Wielding the paintbrush in post-Impressionist style to create a patchwork of vivid colors, he depicts a typical city corner with street lamps, signs, and a manhole cover. Six men, possibly homeless, huddle around a trash can to warm their hands.

Cities continue to fascinate and repel Black artists. But the mood of Charles Searles’ 1975 panoramic acrylic, “Celebration,” is exuberant. It could be a street festival in the artist’s hometown of Philadelphia, but was clearly influenced by the artist’s earlier trip to Nigeria. The canvas is alive with vibrant patterns and textures evoking the textiles of Africa.

A different kind of muralist was Purvis Young, whose 1988 untitled acrylic painting depicts horses surrounded by a frame of abstract rectangular designs. Young, a native of Miami, was a self-taught urban artist who began painting on scrap lumber scavenged from the inner-city neighborhood where he lived, often attaching his paintings to the boarded-up fronts of abandoned buildings.

Thornton Dial’s 1992 mixed-media painting, “Top of the Line,” combines enamel, unbraided canvas roping, and metal on plywood.  This emotional, frenzied work was Dial’s response to the Los Angeles riots of 1992, when looters ran amok after a jury found four white policemen not guilty of beating an unarmed Black motorist, Rodney King.

The exhibition also includes sculpture. Sargent Johnson’s 1930s copper sculpture on a wood base, “Mask,” was one of many masks he created. Some were faithful to old African designs, and others depicted people with contemporary American hairstyles, but all were clearly designed to capture the natural beauty and dignity of his race. One also has to wonder whether his interpretations of African masks was an ironic comment on European artists, such as Picasso, who appropriated native African masks and related imagery for profit.

The exhibition’s catalog, “African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond,” celebrates modern and contemporary artworks in the Smithsonian American Art Museum collection by African American artists. It will be available in the Museum Shop. Extensive biographical information on all the artists in this exhibition can also be accessed by searching for an artist’s name on the website of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The Hudson River Museum is located at 511 Warburton Avenue in Yonkers. Museum hours are Thursday–Sunday, 12–5pm. All visitors 12+ must show proof of full vaccination or a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of visit; those 18+ must also show proof of identity. Visitors under 12 may enter only if accompanied by an adult who can show proof of full vaccination or a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of visit.

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News: RARELY-SEEN BOXER AT BERRY CAMPBELL, November 24, 2021 - Piri Halsz

RARELY-SEEN BOXER AT BERRY CAMPBELL

November 24, 2021 - Piri Halsz

Though I've reviewed the paintings of Stanley Boxer (1926 – 2000) many times, mostly it has been his work from the '80s and '90s that I discussed, the pictures covered with glittering, glistering accretions of matière. Only occasionally have I glanced at let alone reviewed his work from the early 1970s, but these are the paintings now featured in "Stanley Boxer: The Ribbon Paintings (1971- 1976)" at Berry Campbell in Chelsea (through December 23).  And they form a wonderful chapter in pure painting.

Born in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Boxer served in the U.S. Navy during World War II, and then studied art at the Art Students League on the G. I. Bill of Rights.  He exhibited at various Manhattan galleries from 1953 onward.  Still, it doesn't seem to have been until he arrived at Tibor de Nagy in 1971 that some observers began calling him a color-field painter (a designation he always denied, scorning affiliation with any group at all).

According to the brochure essay to the present show by Lisa N. Peters, immediately before 1971, Boxer had been making collages with strips of canvas.   A half-way stage may be seen in two of the earlier pictures in this show, most notably "Willowsnowpond" (1972).  This good-sized horizontal oil on linen depicts a few totally opaque matte bands of  beige wiggling across the perimeters of an equally opaque matte field of dark brown.

Still, other paintings done earlier already boast of more transparent --- and painterly -- layers of paint. "Warmfield" (1971), another and larger square oil on linen, has just such a luminous field of medium green, near whose perimeters stroll vertical arched bands of mustard, olive – and a horizontal one of mauve.

There is something very friendly about these paintings: they do not insist; they invite. And particularly this may be seen by the latest and often largest paintings ranged at the front of the gallery and hung near its entrance, with their loose and ever-more-transparent fields of paint.

To be honest, the subtlety of the brushwork in this series of paintings makes them particularly difficult to appreciate in reproduction.  However, the range of tonalities can at least be listed by this correspondent in three cases.

First is the "overmantel" hung above the reception desk. It is titled (in Boxer's characteristic seriocomic portmanteau style) "Seagustglories" (1974), and is a horizontal oil on linen with three horizontal bands, respectively of ocher, lime and mint.

Second is the very tall and narrow "Sunbraid" (1973), also an oil on linen (though there are a few oils on canvas in this show). Hung in the first main gallery space, with its back to the reception desk, "Sunbraid" has a field of mixed orange and lime, upon which is superimposed a soaring, narrow vertical black wiggly line that makes me think of a bird in flight.

Finally and most impressively is "Rainnights" (1973), a large, nearly square vertical oil on linen whose field is a wonderfully mottled raspberry ice. Arched over this field on the top and right-hand side of the canvas wanders a long orange line, while anchoring down the lower left corner are a few short horizontal lines like twigs in cool blues and greens. 

If this isn't a very fresh and different kind of color-field painting, it's a kissing cousin to it – so affectionate it is.

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News: MUSEUM EXHIBITION | Frank Wimberley: Encounters | Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection, November 19, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York

MUSEUM EXHIBITION | Frank Wimberley: Encounters | Recent Acquisitions to the Permanent Collection

November 19, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York

Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York
November 18, 2021 - February 27, 2022
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News: Nanette Carter | ANONYMOUS WAS A WOMAN ANNOUNCES 2021 WINNERS, PROGRAM EXPANSION, November 10, 2021 - Artforum

Nanette Carter | ANONYMOUS WAS A WOMAN ANNOUNCES 2021 WINNERS, PROGRAM EXPANSION

November 10, 2021 - Artforum

Anonymous Was a Woman (AWAW), a New York–based organization that for two decades has sought to support women-identifying artists over forty, has announced the winners of its 2021 grants. Owing to a dramatic increase in funding provided by two anonymous donors, AWAW is able to provide a dozen more of the unrestricted $25,000 grants than originally expected; the $300,000 windfall will be divided among four artists annually for the next three years, meaning that the group is able to award grants to fourteen winners annually through 2023, rather than the typical ten. Artnews reports that one of the s donations was made through the newly established Meraki Artist Award, founded by an anonymous Boston-based philanthropist.

“I am delighted to congratulate this year’s award recipients—a group of extraordinary artists who represent a multitude of viewpoints, backgrounds, and formal practices,” said founder Susan Unterberg said. “When I started Anonymous Was A Woman, I did so to address a need that I felt personally as a woman artist in the middle of her career. I never dreamed that it could inspire other individuals to join us in advancing our mission.”

Artists were chosen from applicants anonymously recommended by a group of art historians curators, writers, and artists. Among the recipients this year are interdisciplinary artist and activist Coco Fusco, sculptor Anna Sew Hoy, Lakota painter Dyani White Hawk, and light artist Marian Zazeela, a cofounder with LaMonte Young of New York’s Dream House.

Anonymous Was a Woman was established in 1996 by Unterberg, an artist, who initially served as its sole funder; it  gained widespread attention in 2018 when she revealed herself as its founder. The organization’s grants are unique in that they are awarded to midcareer artists, many of whom are underrecognized. Though the sum awarded is modest, an AWAW grant can provide a career boost at a critical juncture. Many recipients of the award have gone on to gain greater recognition.

The full list of 2021 recipients is below.
Nanette Carter
Oletha DeVane
Adama Delphine Fawundu
Anita Fields
Coco Fusco
Renée Green
Judithe Hernández
Suzanne Jackson
Autumn Knight
Adia Millett
Anna Sew Hoy
Julie Tolentino
Dyani White Hawk
Marian Zazeela

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News: Nanette Carter | Anonymous Was a Woman Names 2021 Winners, Expands Award Program, November  9, 2021 - Tessa Solomon for ARTnews

Nanette Carter | Anonymous Was a Woman Names 2021 Winners, Expands Award Program

November 9, 2021 - Tessa Solomon for ARTnews

The New York–based organization Anonymous Was a Woman has revealed the winners of its 2021 awards, each of which carries a $25,000 purse. For two decades, the awards have been given annually to women-identifying artists over the age of 40.

Now, for the first time, Anonymous Was a Woman is dramatically growing its program. Thanks to two anonymous donors, the organization will give out an additional $300,000 in funding to 12 artists. Through the donors’ gifts—one of which was made through the Meraki Artist Award, a new initiative from an anonymous Boston-based philanthropist—the awards program will be able to recognize four more artists annually for the next three years, bringing the total amount of people recognized to 14 instead of the typical 10.

The 2021 awardees range in age from 41 to 81, and include Nanette Carter, a New York–based educator and mixed media artist known for her abstract paintings on sheaths of frosted Mylar; Anita Fields, a ceramic and textile artist of Osage heritage; and Suzanne Jackson, a visual artist and poet, and director of the now-defunct Gallery 32, one of the first commercial spaces to promote emerging African American artists in Los Angeles in the late 1960s. Also awarded is performance artist, dancer, and activist Julie Tolentino, who last year received Queer|Art’s annual $10,000 award for Sustained Achievement.

“It is an unexpected honor to finally receive recognition for my work as a painter and sculptor,” Jackson told ARTnews. “I have known about the Anonymous Was A Woman award for years, though I never thought that I would be a recipient. I plan to use the award funds to continue my work exploring new aspects of integrating drawing, painting, and sculptured forms as related to various American relationships to our natural and urban environments.” Continue Reading

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News: Nanette Carter | The Anonymous Was a Woman Grant Has Selected Its Largest-Ever Cohort of Female Artists Over 40—See Work by the Winners Here, November  9, 2021 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

Nanette Carter | The Anonymous Was a Woman Grant Has Selected Its Largest-Ever Cohort of Female Artists Over 40—See Work by the Winners Here

November 9, 2021 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

The award will give out an additional $300,000 over the next three years thanks to an anonymous donation.

The Anonymous Was a Woman awards are back and better than ever, thanks to new donations—made anonymously, naturally—that will expand the number of annual honorees from 10 to 14 for the next three years. That increases the total amount of grant money to $350,000 each year, with each recipient receiving $25,000 in unrestricted funds.

Since 1996, the organization has presented grants to women-identifying artists over the age of 40, a segment that is frequently overlooked by both the market and museums. Founder Susan Unterberg, an artist herself, only revealed her identity in 2018. The additional funding comes from two donors, one of which is a Boston-based philanthropist who made the gift through a new initiative called the Meraki Artist Award, according to ARTnews.

The 2021 winners, who are between the ages of 41 and 81, are: Nanette CarterOletha DeVaneAdama Delphine FawunduAnita FieldsCoco FuscoRenée GreenJudithe HernándezSuzanne JacksonAutumn KnightAdia MillettAnna Sew HoyJulie TolentinoDyani White Hawk, and Marian Zazeela.

“I am delighted to congratulate this year’s award recipients—a group of extraordinary artists who represent a multitude of viewpoints, backgrounds, and formal practices,” Unterberg said in a statement. “When I started Anonymous Was A Woman, I did so to address a need that I felt personally as a woman artist in the middle of her career. I never dreamed that it could inspire other individuals to join us in advancing our mission.” Continue Reading

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News: Frederick J. Brown | ‘Fighting for Change’: Life as a Black Artist | The New York Times, October 26, 2021 - Alina Tugend for The New York Times

Frederick J. Brown | ‘Fighting for Change’: Life as a Black Artist | The New York Times

October 26, 2021 - Alina Tugend for The New York Times

‘Fighting for Change’: Life as a Black Artist

The work and struggle by Jamel Robinson and other artists is part of the “African American Art in the 20th Century” exhibition at the Hudson River Museum.

“Fighting for Change: Fist Full of Tears,” the title of one of the five works Jamel Robinson is showing at the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, N.Y., encapsulates the artist’s love of wordplay as well as philosophy about what it means to be a Black man making art in America.

The piece is a pair of boxing gloves covered in black paint and pennies mounted on a large black, green and white canvas.

“As Black people we’re fighting for change, and as a Black artist, we’re always trying to move forward — it always feels like we’re fighting for change and sometimes literally for change,” said Mr. Robinson, 42, who was born and raised in Harlem.

He is the teaching artist-in-residence at the museum in conjunction with the “African American Art in the 20th Century” exhibition, which includes 43 works by some of the country’s most famous Black artists. Mr. Robinson’s first museum show and the 20th Century exhibition will run concurrently from Oct. 15 through Jan. 16. Continue Reading




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News: Nathanson, Wilkin to deliver Sheldon’s Oct. 26 ‘CollectionTalk’, October 23, 2021 - Nebraska Today

Nathanson, Wilkin to deliver Sheldon’s Oct. 26 ‘CollectionTalk’

October 23, 2021 - Nebraska Today

Sheldon Museum of Art will a conversation with artist Jill Nathanson and curator and critic Karen Wilkin on Oct. 26 at 5:30 p.m. via on Zoom. Nathanson’s painting “Cantabile” is a new acquisition on view at Sheldon in the exhibition, “Point of Departure: Abstraction 1958–Present.”

Registration is required for the free event.

Nathanson completed her undergraduate studies at Bennington College in Vermont, where she worked in the artistic orbit once occupied by Helen Frankenthaler. Although both artists are known for reducing painting to its physical essence, Nathanson’s immersive and sensual paintings stand in a category of their own. Consisting of unusual hues of overlapping layers of variable translucency, they create emotionally nuanced experiences with yet enough tension to engage the viewer’s contemplation. Her most recent solo show was “Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase” at Berry Campbell Gallery, New York, in January 2021.

Wilkin is a New York-based curator and critic. Educated at Barnard College and Columbia University, she is the author of monographs on Stuart Davis, David Smith, Anthony Caro, Isaac Witkin, Kenneth Noland, Helen Frankenthaler, Giorgio Morandi, Georges Braque, Wayne Thiebaud and Hans Hofmann, and has organized international exhibitions of their work. She was a juror for the American Pavilion of the 2009 Venice Biennale and a contributing editor of the Stuart Davis and Hans Hofmann paintings catalogues raisonné. The contributing editor for art for the Hudson Review and a regular contributor to The New Criterion, Hopkins Review, and the Wall Street Journal, Wilkin teaches in the New York Studio School’s MFA program.

This online event is part of the museum’s CollectionTalk series, which features live discussions about artwork and exhibitions with artists, curators, and historians. On Nov. 11, the series continues with artist Odili Donald Odita in conversation with Tyler Green, host of the Modern Art Notes Podcast. For more information on Sheldon Museum of Art and its programming, visit its website.

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News: Frank Wimberley, Nanette Carter | Artforum: Creating Community: Cinque Gallery Artists, Art Students League of New York, October 19, 2021 - Artforum

Frank Wimberley, Nanette Carter | Artforum: Creating Community: Cinque Gallery Artists, Art Students League of New York

October 19, 2021 - Artforum

This past summer, the Art Students League of New York held the first historic exhibition dedicated to Cinque Gallery, an artist-led nonprofit that operated between 1969 and 2004. The brainchild of Romare Bearden, Ernest Crichlow, and Norman Lewis, Cinque was founded to exhibit and promote the work of marginalized, primarily Black artists, while also serving as a training ground for young arts administrators of color. Cinque was to some extent an outgrowth of the Spiral group, which met regularly from 1963 to 1965 to debate the role of Black artists in the struggle for civil rights. The gallery was named in honor of Sengbe Pieh—also known as Joseph Cinqué, the Mende man who led the rebellion aboard the Spanish slave ship La Amistad in 1839—and emerged in lockstep with the Black Power movement amid a push for cultural and economic autonomy in the arts. Continue Reading

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News: Frederick J. Brown featured in "African American Art in the 20th Century," Hudson River Museum, New York, October 16, 2021 - Hudson River Museum, New York

Frederick J. Brown featured in "African American Art in the 20th Century," Hudson River Museum, New York

October 16, 2021 - Hudson River Museum, New York

Drawn from the permanent collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, these works range in style from modern abstraction to stained color to the postmodern assemblage of found objects, and their subjects are diverse. Benny AndrewsEllis Wilson, and William H. Johnson speak to the dignity and resilience of people who work the land. Jacob Lawrence and Thornton Dial, Sr. acknowledge the struggle for economic and civil rights. Sargent JohnsonLoïs Mailou Jones, and Melvin Edwards address the heritage of Africa, and images by Romare Bearden celebrate jazz musicians. Sam Gilliam and Felrath Hines conduct innovative experiments with color and form. This will be the only New York venue for the exhibition.

The featured artworks were created at significant social and political moments in America. Words of Howard University philosophy professor Alain Locke, novelist James Baldwin, Civil Rights leader Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and their contemporaries provided insight and inspiration. In response, these artists created an image of America that recognizes individuals and community and acknowledges the role of art in celebrating the complex and diverse nature of American society. As featured artist Jacob Lawrence stated in 1951, “My pictures express my life and experience . . . the things I have experienced extend to my national, racial, and class group. I paint the American scene.”

The related catalog, African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond, celebrates modern and contemporary artworks in the Smithsonian American Art Museum collection by African American artists. The book, co-published with Skira Rizzoli in New York, is written by Richard J. Powell, the John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History at Duke University; and Virginia Mecklenburg, chief curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum; with contributions from Maricia Battle, curator in the prints and drawings division at the Library of Congress.

African American Art in the 20th Century is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The C.F. Foundation in Atlanta supports the museum’s traveling exhibition program, Treasures to Go. The William R. Kenan Jr. Endowment Fund provided financial suppor

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News: Perle Fine featured in "Labyrinth of Forms: Women and Abstraction, 1930–1950," Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, October 16, 2021 - Whitney Museum of American Art

Perle Fine featured in "Labyrinth of Forms: Women and Abstraction, 1930–1950," Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

October 16, 2021 - Whitney Museum of American Art

Labyrinth of Forms: Women and Abstraction, 1930–1950
Oct 9, 2021–Mar 2022
More Information

During the 1930s and 1940s, abstraction began to gain momentum as an exciting, fresh approach to modern artmaking in the United States, and a small contingent of American artists dedicated themselves to it. Labyrinth of Forms, a title inspired by an Alice Trumbull Mason work in the exhibition, alludes to the sense of discovery that drove these artists to establish a visual language reflecting the advances of the twentieth century.

A significant number of American abstractionists were women, and their efforts propelled the formal, technical, and conceptual evolution of abstract art in this country. A few, such as Lee Krasner and Louise Nevelson, have been duly recognized, but most remain overlooked despite their contributions. With over thirty works by twenty-seven artists drawn almost entirely from the Whitney’s collection, Labyrinth of Forms highlights both the achievements of these artists and the ways in which works on paper served as sites for important exploration and innovation.

While abstraction would prevail in the United States after World War II, in the preceding decades American abstractionists were vastly outnumbered by realist practitioners. Maligned by critics, and largely ignored by museums and galleries, these artists nevertheless saw themselves as aesthetic revolutionaries. In contrast to their European counterparts, who were often involved with movements defined by manifestos, they felt free to experiment, harnessing a broad range of styles to express the mood of the modern United States.

Buoyed by modernist art courses and new venues for viewing European avant-garde art, they forged a network of overlapping communities, organizations, and creative spaces—including the American Abstract Artists and the Atelier 17 print studio—that allowed them to support one another, exchange ideas, and exhibit their work. Women were key figures in such groups, often taking on leadership roles. They also wrote and lectured on abstraction and advanced methods of making, particularly in print media. Though many of these artists still deserve wider acclaim, their influence and ideas resonate even today.

This exhibition is organized by Sarah Humphreville, Senior Curatorial Assistant.

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News: Nanette Carter | "Exuberance: Dialogues in African American Abstract Painting" at the Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art, James Madison University, October  8, 2021 - Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art

Nanette Carter | "Exuberance: Dialogues in African American Abstract Painting" at the Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art, James Madison University

October 8, 2021 - Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art

Exuberance: Dialogues in African-American Abstract Painting
Curated by Susan Zurbrigg and Beth Hinderlitter
Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia
October 26 - December 10, 2021

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The upcoming exhibition at Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art, Exuberance: Dialogues in African American Abstract Painting, celebrates African American painters and challenges received narratives about abstract art and who makes it. Abstract paintings by African American artists have often been overlooked and omitted from the history of art presented by white scholars and white dominated art institutions, yet their works have contributed powerfully to the field of painting. This focused presentation of paintings will feature works from the 1950s to present day, forging cross-generational dialogues about racial identity, dynamics of color and pattern, as well as rhythm, movement, and breath.

Featured artists include Charles Burwell, Nanette Carter, Lisa Corinne Davis, Lamerol Gatewood, Rico Gatson, Felrath Hines, Norman Lewis, Erika Ranee, Ronald Walton, Benjamin Wigfall and Susan Zurbrigg. Lenders to the exhibition include the Virginia Museum of Fine Art, the Ackland Museum of Art at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Berry Campbell Gallery, Bridgette Mayer Gallery, Jenkins Johnson Gallery New York and San Francisco, Miles McEnery Gallery and Walton Gallery.

Public programming will include a discussion on November 10, 5p of the history and politics of African American painting led by Dr. Jordana Saggese, Associate Professor at the University of Maryland and award-winning author of Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art. Contributing artist Lisa Corinne Davis will offer an online artist talk on Nov. 16 at 5pm. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully-illustrated catalogue, with scholarly essays and selected bibliography.

Exuberance is co-curated by Susan Zurbrigg and Beth Hinderliter. Susan Zurbrigg is a nationally exhibited artist, educator and activist. She is Assistant Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts at JMU as well as a Professor of Art. Dr. Beth Hinderliter is Director of the Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art and an Associate Professor of Art History.  Her book, More Than Our Pain: Affect and Emotion in the Era of Black Lives Matter, was published by SUNY Press in 2021.

Contact Beth Hinderliter, director of the Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art, at (540) 568-6407 or by email at hindersb@jmu.edu for more information or to schedule a group visit.

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News: Jill Nathanson | CollectionTalk: Jill Nathanson and Karen Wilkin at the Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska, October  8, 2021 - Sheldon Museum of Art

Jill Nathanson | CollectionTalk: Jill Nathanson and Karen Wilkin at the Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska

October 8, 2021 - Sheldon Museum of Art

CollectionTalk: Jill Nathanson and Karen Wilkin
October 26, 2021
5:30 pm CT

More Information

Comparisons between color-field painters Jill Nathanson (born 1955 and Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) come naturall, although each is undeniably her own person—and her artwork is uniquely remarkable.

Save the date October 26th at 5:30 pm CT for a cocktail-hour zoom with Jill nathanson and author, curator, and historian Karen Wilkin. Join us for a discussion that will surely cover Sheldon's recent acquisition of Nathanson's painting, Cantabile, and the common ground she shared with Helen Frankenthaler.

To attend, RSVP to Laurel Ybarra at laurel.ybarra@unl.edu or 402.472.1454

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News: Tampa Museum of Art | Trauma & Race; Art & Healing: Dr. Brittany Peters, A Community Discussion- Mike Solomon, and Kirk Ke Wang facilitated  discussion  featuring  the  artists  Mike  Solomon  and  Kirk  Ke  Wang,  Dr.  Brittany  Peters, Clinical Director, October  1, 2021 - Tampa Museum of Art

Tampa Museum of Art | Trauma & Race; Art & Healing: Dr. Brittany Peters, A Community Discussion- Mike Solomon, and Kirk Ke Wang facilitated discussion featuring the artists Mike Solomon and Kirk Ke Wang, Dr. Brittany Peters, Clinical Director

October 1, 2021 - Tampa Museum of Art

Sunday, October 10, 2021
2 - 3 pm

Register

Inspired by the powerful works of artists John Sims, Mike Solomon, and Kirk Ke Wang on view in Skyway 20/21: A Contemporary Collaboration, the museum is proud to host this meaningful community discussion on the impact current and historical racial trauma.

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News: F5: Elena Frampton Spills Her Favorite Gallery, Walking Partner + More, September 25, 2021 - Kelly Beal for design/milk

F5: Elena Frampton Spills Her Favorite Gallery, Walking Partner + More

September 25, 2021 - Kelly Beal for design/milk

Interior designer and art advisor Elena Frampton is the founder and principal of Frampton Co. With locations in New York City and Bridgehampton, the firm designs and creates interior experiences, specializing in interior architecture, design and art advisement. Elena’s design approach is instinctual from the get-go. She reads a client’s latent desires for their space, bringing to life environments that they themselves didn’t yet know they wanted. Elena’s work gives shape and feeling to visions for where and how we live

art gallery with white walls and three abstract paintings5. Berry Campbell
One of my go-to galleries in New York City is Berry Campbell – great art works, friendly atmosphere and an inspiring robust program! The gallery champions female painters like Yvonne Thomas, Perle Fine and Judith Godwin, giving women artists long overdue consideration on the market. They also represent a diverse range of works with something for everyone: from minimalist Walter Darby Bannard, to the more expressive William Perehudoff, to the very geometric Ken Greenleaf. I can also spend forever perusing their online inventory – a convenience especially now.

 

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News: VIDEO | Ken Greenleaf: Recent Work, September 21, 2021 - Berry Campbell

VIDEO | Ken Greenleaf: Recent Work

September 21, 2021 - Berry Campbell

News: Lincoln Journal Star | Sheldon's 'Point of Departure' surveys 6 decades of abstract painting, September  7, 2021 - L. Kent Wolgamott for Lincoln Journal Star

Lincoln Journal Star | Sheldon's 'Point of Departure' surveys 6 decades of abstract painting

September 7, 2021 - L. Kent Wolgamott for Lincoln Journal Star

"Point of Departure,” the fall’s major exhibition at Sheldon Museum of Art, takes its name from a 1964 album by jazz pianist Andrew Hill, a recording that reaches back toward Bach, but nearly 60 years after it was recorded, continues to point to the future.

In similar fashion, the paintings that fill Sheldon’s north galleries reach back to a point just after abstraction’s mid-20th century peak and take non-objective painting forward for six decades, pointing toward what is yet to come.

Impressively, the visually striking, intellectually and historically rich exhibition is primarily drawn from Sheldon’s collection of 20th and 21st century art that is unmatched by any other university museum in the country.

“We have so much abstraction and we’re well known for abstraction, starting in 1910,” said Wally Mason, Sheldon’s director and chief curator. “We shifted from abstract painting to abstract sculpture during George's (Neubert) tenure. But we always acquired some. In my time, this is something we’re continuing to do.”

In using 1958 as its starting date, Mason, who curated the exhibition, ensured that “Point of Departure” would include little work from the “first generation” of abstract expressionists, excluding oft-seen Sheldon gems by Mark Rothko, Willem deKooning, Barnett Newman, Clyfford Still and Robert Motherwell. Read More

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News: Artnet News | Art Dealers at Intersect Aspen Say the Pop-Up Fair Was a Roaring Success—and a Great Chance to Finally See Collectors Again, August  5, 2021 - Eileen Kinsella for Artnet News

Artnet News | Art Dealers at Intersect Aspen Say the Pop-Up Fair Was a Roaring Success—and a Great Chance to Finally See Collectors Again

August 5, 2021 - Eileen Kinsella for Artnet News

The absence of most in-person art fairs in the past year and a half appears to be making the white-hot art market even hotter. That’s the takeaway from the opening day of the pop-up Intersect Aspen art fair, which takes place in a city overrun with billionaires. The fair, which features 30 galleries from 26 cities and was described by one fairgoer as “tiny but exquisite,” attracted a bevy of collectors, including Andrea and John Stark, Janna Bullock, and heiress Elizabeth Esteve.

Sales were fast and furious, organizers said. Galerie Gmurzynska, whose director Isabelle Bscher made a concerted effort not to presell works (as galleries often do at major fairs), sold a Joan Miró painting, Tête (1979), for $2 million in the first hour of the opening day. Two days later, Gmurzynska reported selling another work, a small Picasso titled Compotier avec raisin (Pigeons) (1927) for over $1.5 million.

“Where better to be than Aspen?” asked Christine Berry of New York’s Berry Campbell Gallery. “We have a renewed appreciation for being at an art fair in person.”

Seattle dealer Greg Kucera reported selling work by Chris Engman for $5,000 and by Humaira Abid for $8,000. The gallery is also showing two new works by Deborah Butterfield that were made specifically for Intersect Aspen, and are on view for the first time.

“The fair opened on Sunday morning at 10 with a bang,” New York dealer Nancy Hoffman said. “Starting with energy is key to the success of the event, and this is a success. This is our first in-person fair since the pandemic, and it has been great so far, positive on all levels. The right size, the right place, the right audience, the right fair director and organization.”

Hoffman said responses have been strong to the gallery’s booth theme of wild flowers, which is inspired by Aspen’s floral landscape. With prices for works ranging from $1,800 to $75,000, she said the gallery sold works priced from $5,000 to $30,000.

Half Gallery sold out a booth of works by Hiejin Yoo (prices ranged from $12,000 to $20,000), Young Lim Lee (priced around $8,000), and Umar Rashid (priced around $25,000). Director Erin Goldberger said she was using the opportunity to meet new clients, see old clients, and talk about the artists on view with visitors.

Goldberger said many of the collectors at the fair have not been back to New York since the start of COVID, so this is the first time many are seeing artworks from galleries they work with in person. Emmanuel Perrotin sold works by Daniel Arsham from two different series, including one featured prominently in the booth, Quartz Eroded Basketball Hoop (2021), which sold for a price in the range of $60,000 to $90,000.

Edward Cella Art and Architecture gallery sold a painting by Wosene Worke Kosrof, House Full of Words (2014), for $46,000, with strong interest from buyers in additional works. “I’m pleasantly surprised by the quality and intelligence of the collectors, who are geographically dispersed throughout the country,” said gallery owner Edward Cella.

 

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News: Museum Acquisition: The Georgia Museum of Art acquires Frank Wimberley, Tourquoise, 2012, August  3, 2021 - The Georgia Museum of Art

Museum Acquisition: The Georgia Museum of Art acquires Frank Wimberley, Tourquoise, 2012

August 3, 2021 - The Georgia Museum of Art



Frank Wimberley
Tourquoise, 2012
Acrylic on canvas
62 x 48 inches

View works by Frank Wimberley

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News: Market Brief: Demand for Grace Hartigan’s Pioneering Ab-Ex Oeuvre Extends to Works on Paper, August  2, 2021 - Shannon Lee for Artsy News

Market Brief: Demand for Grace Hartigan’s Pioneering Ab-Ex Oeuvre Extends to Works on Paper

August 2, 2021 - Shannon Lee for Artsy News

Last Wednesday, a mixed-media collage by the late Abstract Expressionist artist Grace Hartigan sold for $75,000 at a Christie’s online auction, achieving five times its high estimate and breaking the auction record for works on paper by the artist. Hartigan, who was lauded as “the most celebrated of the young American women painters” by Life magazine in 1958, has seen a steady surge in demand for her trailblazing work in recent years. This is partly due to a growing wave of market interest in female Abstract Expressionists from collectors looking to correct their omission from art history.

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Featured Work: Sundancer, 1988

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News: The Aspen Times: What to See at Intersect Aspen, July 30, 2021 - Andrew Travers for The Aspen Times

The Aspen Times: What to See at Intersect Aspen

July 30, 2021 - Andrew Travers for The Aspen Times

The annual contemporary art fair in the Aspen Ice Garden is back for an in-person experience Aug. 1-5. With a new owner and new producer, it’ll look different than it did pre-pandemic, when it was known as ArtAspen, but the new Intersect Aspen is still offering a curated selection of international galleries showing and selling postwar art and blue-chip artists.

The new Intersect Aspen is hosting 30 exhibitors from 26 cities, filling the ice rink with a sampling of works from some of the leading contemporary art galleries and also a glimpse of the insane heights of the pandemic’s commercial art market. Intersect Art and Design acquired ArtAspen in April 2020 and hosted a virtual version of the fair last summer.

The new version of the fair hits as the international art world descends on the resort for the Aspen Art Museum’s annual ArtCrush gala, which has its main events running Aug. 4-6, and as a bumper crop of leading multi-national galleries have opened seasonal pop-ups in Aspen.

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News: Intersect Aspen reenters art fair world, focuses on community and connection, July 27, 2021 - Jacqueline Reynolds for the Aspen Daily News

Intersect Aspen reenters art fair world, focuses on community and connection

July 27, 2021 - Jacqueline Reynolds for the Aspen Daily News

Hoffman spoke heartily about the exhibitions that will be on view, ­especially when discussing TOTAH’s interesting presentation of Alex Sewell’s paintings in conversation with Saul Steinberg’s drawings to explore the concept of text through art, Berry Campbell Gallery’s group exhibition featuring underrepresented women artists of the Postwar movement and a monumental Clyfford Still oil painting, “PH-568, 1965,” which will be featured in Sélavy by Di Donna’s art and design exhibition.

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News: Artsy Viewing Room | Berry Campbell at Intersect Aspen: Women of Abstract Expressionism , July 21, 2021 - Artsy

Artsy Viewing Room | Berry Campbell at Intersect Aspen: Women of Abstract Expressionism

July 21, 2021 - Artsy

Berry Campbell at Intersect Aspen:
Women of Abstract Expressionism
Booth A15

Visit Viewing Room

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News: Ida Kohlmeyer on view at New Orleans Museum of Art, July 14, 2021 - New Orleans Museum of Art

Ida Kohlmeyer on view at New Orleans Museum of Art

July 14, 2021 - New Orleans Museum of Art

These symbols [in Ida Kohlmeyer’s work] exist as a kind of pictographic code, inviting us to try to decipher their meaning, but always evading any clear reference or easy interpretation...Her work feels like a code that we are never quite meant to crack.”⁠
—Katie A. Pfohl, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art⁠

This month, Ida Kohlmeyer’s painted aluminum sculpture Rebus 3D-89-3 returns to the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, newly refreshed from structural repairs and brandishing a brand new coat of paint. The expert restoration—undertaken by Kohlmeyer’s longtime fabricator G. Paul Lucas of Lucas Limited in Louisburg, Kansas—brings the work back to its intended brilliancy and allows us to appreciate the work of one of Louisiana’s most influential and enigmatic abstract artists anew.

Kohlmeyer, a native New Orleanian, is nationally recognized for her vibrant abstract paintings and sculptures, which are among the most vanguard works of modern art made in New Orleans during the twentieth century. She is best known for her signature “cluster” compositions: large painted canvases divided into loose grids filled with vibrantly colored abstract shapes and forms that are at once abstract, linguistic, and deeply personal.

These symbols—either gridded on canvas or presented as freestanding sculptures—exist as a kind of pictographic code, inviting us to try to decipher their meaning, but always evading any clear reference or easy interpretation. Often titling her sculptures Rebus, a term that refers to a type of puzzle or “picture riddle” in which words are represented by combinations of pictures and letters, her work feels like a code that we are never quite meant to crack.

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News: Eric Dever featured in Widewalls Newsletter, June 24, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Eric Dever featured in Widewalls Newsletter

June 24, 2021 - Berry Campbell



Eric Dever
Trout Pond-Summer
Oil on canvas
36 x 48 inches
More Information

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News: Berry Campbell to participate in Intersect Aspen 2021, June 23, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell to participate in Intersect Aspen 2021

June 23, 2021 - Berry Campbell

New York, NY, June 9, 2020—Intersect Art and Design announces a pop-up edition of Intersect Aspen, an art and design fair taking place in person at the Aspen Ice Garden from August 1-5, 2021. The show will open with a VIP Preview Brunch on Sunday, August 1 from 10am to 11am, followed by a Public Opening Reception from 11am to 12pm, and will be open to the public daily from 11am to 5pm. The fair will also be presented online at Artsy.net from August 1-19, 2021.

Becca Hoffman, Managing Director of Intersect Art and Design says, “We are so pleased to be returning to Aspen this summer for what promises to be a dynamic and exciting time in the mountains. As our first in-person event since the pandemic, the curated selection of galleries highlights a thoughtful mix of established and younger galleries from around the country showcasing art, design, and photography.”

Tim von Gal, CEO of Intersect Art and Design adds, “As in-person events return, there is a palpable momentum and excitement to be in Aspen this summer, which is a sentiment that is shared by the local community, and so many galleries and collectors who are coming from out of town. This pop-up edition of Intersect Aspen will be a vibrant destination for people who can’t wait to get back to seeing art, and each other, in person.”

Paul Laster, Curatorial Advisor for Intersect Art and Design, comments, “An invitation-only, intimate art and design fair, Intersect Aspen has been selectively curated to stimulate an already 2 art-savvy audience in Aspen. Presenting a lively array of works newly made by artists in isolation and historical pieces from the postwar era, Intersect Aspen’s exhibitors are excited to engage the public, share their passions, and find new followers for the artists and designers they truly admire.” Regional cultural partners include Carbondale Arts, Red Brick Center for the Arts, and The Art Base, with others to be announced.

Exhibiting cultural partners include Aspen Film, presenting four acclaimed animated short films from its 2020 and 2021 Oscar®-qualifying Shortsfests; and STONELEAF RETREAT presenting a large-scale fiber work by Liz Collins, and a digital pigment print by Keisha Scarville who are both alumni residents of STONELEAF.

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News: Artforum | Judith Godwin (1930-2021), June 11, 2021 - Anthony Korner for Artforum

Artforum | Judith Godwin (1930-2021)

June 11, 2021 - Anthony Korner for Artforum

Judith Godwin at her solo exhibition: "An Act of Freedom" at Berry Campbell, New York

WHEN THE ARTIST
 Judith Godwin died on May 29 in her ninety-second year, the art world lost the last living member of a generation of women Abstract Expressionists, a group of artists largely overlooked in favor of their male peers. I lost a dear friend. 

My connection with Judith came about through our mutual friend Julie Lawson, a London art-world personality and assistant to Sir Roland Penrose, one of the founders of the city’s Institute of Contemporary Arts. Years later, when I was living in New York, Julie introduced me to Judith, who struck me as a delightful and irreverent Southern lady. What I didn’t recognize at first was how strong a character she was under that lighthearted gentility. At the time, she was celebrating her victory in a court case against a restaurant that was encroaching on her Greenwich Village property. There, in her beautifully tended garden, resplendent with plants she had known and loved in Virginia—including fine camellias and an extraordinary Lady Banks climbing rose—Franz Kline and Ruth Kligman’s cat was a constant presence (they lived nearby). Judith said she was in the habit of giving Kligman a sandwich whenever she stopped by to fetch the animal. Judith also said she had learned a great deal from Kline, especially his late works in color.

Judith was born in 1930 in Suffolk, Virginia, into a distinguished family tracing ancestors back to the state’s first colonial settlers. This was a background she mostly rejected, leaving Virginia after graduating from Mary Baldwin College and what is now Virginia Commonwealth University to become an artist.

With the reluctant blessing of her parents, she moved to New York, where she studied at the Art Students League and later with Hans Hoffmann at his School of Fine Arts and struggled to establish herself. In addition to being a dedicated painter, Judith, to earn a living, had to learn carpentry, stonemasonry, plastering, interior decoration, and landscaping. She was always a welcome and helpful guest in my home, walking around, tools in hand, checking fittings and hinges. In her studio on West Thirteenth Street, she stretched her own canvases and made the frames for her paintings, which were stacked in partitions she constructed and installed. Independence, improvisation, and self-reliance were fundamental to her character.

Judith often spoke to me of the opportunities she had missed as a woman in New York’s 1950s and ’60s art world. She never felt welcome at the Cedar Tavern, that fabled AbEx stomping ground. Once, at a gallery opening early in her career, she was abruptly sidelined by Ellsworth Kelly while trying to speak to Betty Parsons. However, in 1957, she was in the inaugural Betty Parsons Section Eleven Gallery show, and a year later in a group show at Stable Gallery. She went on to be represented by Marisa del Re Gallery, Spanierman Gallery, and, most recently, Berry Campbell Gallery. Her powerful gestural abstractions are in many private collections and have been acquired by the nation’s leading contemporary-art museums.

Still, it always rankled her that her paintings weren’t more widely known or appreciated, especially in comparison to those of her male contemporaries. But she gained recognition for her place in the canon in 2016 with the Denver Art Museum’s groundbreaking “Women of Abstract Expressionism,” which highlighted twelve women artists, Judith among them. It pleased her to know that a major reassessment of her work and life had begun—and now it will be ongoing.

Anthony Korner is publisher of Artforum.

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News: Artsy | Eric Dever: Warhol Montauk Project Artsy Viewing Room and Online Exhibition, June  8, 2021 - Artsy | Berry Campbell

Artsy | Eric Dever: Warhol Montauk Project Artsy Viewing Room and Online Exhibition

June 8, 2021 - Artsy | Berry Campbell

Eric Dever: The Warhol Montauk Project
June 8 - August 20, 2021

Online Exhibition

Online Viewing Room

In 2020, Eric Dever was considered to be a project artist at The Andy Warhol Preserve Visual Arts Program in Montauk, New York. The artist created a series of works related to the landscape and the natural world. This opportunity allowed Eric Dever to have a private place to escape the pandemic world. As a result, the artist created this important group of 18 paintings.

Midpoint through the project, Dever turned his attention from Amsterdam Beach to the greater Montauk area. Upon exploration, Dever found a brochure distributed at the Montauk Lighthouse appropriately titled, “The Explorer’s Club,” originally published in the 1950s. Dever learned about the Montauketts, the land, and the people of Eastern Long Island.

In the Warhol Montauk Project series, Eric Dever takes cues from Warhol’s Self-Portrait (1966) pairing primary and secondary colors, as well as employing the use of different shades of the same color on coarse linen and canvas. Dever applies paint on surfaces rubbed into the support, a process known as decalcomania. Decalcomania was explored by the surrealists and a hallmark of Dever’s painting process. Coupled with ample unpainted surface or negative space the paintings themselves at times resemble serigraphy.

Light sensitivity, shadow, temperature and sound are experiences the artist explores, palpable in these new paintings. The paintings can be viewed online at Artsy or at Berry Campbell Gallery, New York.

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News: 16 Museum Directors Show Us the Art That Hangs in Their Offices, FromArtnet News | Richard Armstrong’s Al Held to Zoé Whitley’s Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, June  4, 2021 - Artnet News

16 Museum Directors Show Us the Art That Hangs in Their Offices, FromArtnet News | Richard Armstrong’s Al Held to Zoé Whitley’s Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

June 4, 2021 - Artnet News

James Steward 
Princeton University Art Museum
Walter Darby Bannard, <i>By the River</i> (1967). © 1967, Walter Darby Bannard. Walter Darby Bannard, By the River (1967). © 1967 Walter Darby Bannard.

One of the paintings I love living with in my office is Darby Bannard’s 1967 painting By the River. Bannard graduated from Princeton in 1957, one year ahead of Frank Stella, with whom he experimented with hard-edge abstraction while they were undergraduates. The painting fills the wall, enveloping us in its sunlit colors. —James Steward

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News: Nanette Carter featured in Artsy: New and Noteworthy Artists, June  4, 2021 - Artsy

Nanette Carter featured in Artsy: New and Noteworthy Artists

June 4, 2021 - Artsy

New and Noteworthy Artists

Fresh off the heels of notable solo shows and fair booths, these bright young things are already making waves in the art world. From figurative painters to digital artists, browse a curated selection of works by the next generation of contemporary masters.


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News: Painter Judith Godwin dies at 91 leaving behind powerful pictures, June  3, 2021 - Joan Altabe for blastingnews

Painter Judith Godwin dies at 91 leaving behind powerful pictures

June 3, 2021 - Joan Altabe for blastingnews

Part of the Abstract Expressionist movement, Godwin was challenged by the male-dominated art world in the ‘50s

“Images generated by the female experience can be a powerful and creative expression for all humanity.”

Gender gap
That was painter Judith Godwin talking at Northern Michigan University in 1978. She died on May 29, 2021, at age 91. But it’s unclear why she believed her images were confined to the female experience because they so plainly transcend gender.

As an Abstract Expressionist, Godwin’s thrusting swaths of paint recall the big, bold paintings of Franz Kline, who favored vertical, horizontal, and diagonal slashes. Her work showed a similar pattern at times, Epic, Epic 2, Black Pillar, and Black Support.

I also recognize elements of Robert Motherwell’s pictures in hers.

Lessons learned
The connection between Godwin’s Abstract Expressionism and that of her male colleagues may stem from having studied with the same teachers. Including Hans Hoffman, of whom she said, “I think the main thing with Hofmann was that I felt completely free to do whatever I wanted to do.”

And what she wanted to do was be bold. According to the Johnson Collection Gallery, which carries some of her work, Hoffman’s use of bold colors “significantly influenced Godwin’s future work."

But finding her place in the male-dominated art world remained an issue for Godwin. An obituary from Berry Campbell Gallery, representing her work for the last ten years, reflected this by noting her “well-deserved place in the male-dominated world.”

The same point was made by the Johnson Collection, saying that because the Abstract Expressionist movement was so full of men, not many women got known.

Come to think of it, even when Lee Krasner became known, and she may have benefited from being Jackson Pollock’s wife.

Female experience
Female artists in other art movements besides Abstract Expressionism faced the same predicament. Underscoring the point that the art world was a men’s club, Sotheby’s just reported its most successful sale in an all-female art auction was a portrait by Francois Gilot of her daughter - one of two children she had with Pablo Picasso.

One can’t help wondering if the record sale had something to do with that relationship.

Lisa Stevens, head of Sotheby’s modern art online, seemed to confirm the point by telling ARTnews, “It isn’t commonly known that Gilot’s commitment to art was present long before her relationship with Pablo Picasso, and she was sadly often left in his shadow.”

Weaker sex?
So, it’s not surprising that Berry Campbell Gallery would place Godwin in a “contingency of strong female practitioners.” There wouldn’t be a need to invoke the words “strong female” unless being a female artist suggested weakness.

Godwin admitted that she felt pressured to create powerful, turbulent work to compete with her male counterparts for critical and commercial attention. The Johnson Collection quotes her saying, “If you were a [woman] painter in that period, you felt you had to paint as strongly, as violently as the men did.” 

 
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News: Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever, Artist, June  3, 2021 - Spotlight on the Arts

Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever, Artist

June 3, 2021 - Spotlight on the Arts

News: Surface Magazine Design Dispatch | Edward Zutrau: Mandarin (Paintings from the 1950s), June  2, 2021 - Surface Magazine

Surface Magazine Design Dispatch | Edward Zutrau: Mandarin (Paintings from the 1950s)

June 2, 2021 - Surface Magazine

The first exhibition of the abstract expressionist painter’s works since his death, in 1993, “Mandarin (Paintings from the 1950s)” showcases how Zutrau blended precepts of the New York School with a strong physicality—geometric spatial divisions and strong gestural marks—to draw viewers into both the feeling and contemplation of movement. 

View Design Dispatch

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News: In Memoriam: Judith Godwin (1930-2021), June  1, 2021 - Berry Campbell

In Memoriam: Judith Godwin (1930-2021)

June 1, 2021 - Berry Campbell

We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Judith Godwin (1930 - 2021). Godwin was an innovative artist, who fought hard for her well-deserved place in the male dominated world of Abstract Expressionism. A painter for over seventy years, collectors, curators, and museums increasingly have acknowledged Godwin’s achievements in the past five years. She was among twelve artists included in the groundbreaking exhibition, Women of Abstract Expressionism, held at the Denver Art Museum, curated by University of Denver professor Gwen F. Chanzit. Included in numerous major museum collections, recently her works have been acquired by countless museums such as the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Mougins Museum of Classical Art, France; the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas; and the Sheldon Art Museum, Lincoln, Nebraska, among many others. Godwin was a playful raconteur and a passionate advocate for women in the arts. We feel fortunate to have worked closely with Judith Godwin for over ten years, and we will miss her sharp wit, her friendship, and her boundless energy and creativity.

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News: Culture Type: Latest News in Black Art: Phylicia Rashad Named Dean of Fine Arts at Howard University, Chicago Artist Eugene Wade Has Died, Nanette Carter Joins Berry Campbell, May 14, 2021 - Victoria L. Valentine for Culture Type

Culture Type: Latest News in Black Art: Phylicia Rashad Named Dean of Fine Arts at Howard University, Chicago Artist Eugene Wade Has Died, Nanette Carter Joins Berry Campbell

May 14, 2021 - Victoria L. Valentine for Culture Type

Latest News in Black Art features regular news updates and developments in the world of art and related cultur



Representation
New York gallery Berry Campbell announced its representation of Nanette Carter on May 12. Active since the mid-1970s, Carter “creates abstract collages expressive of her sensitivity to injustice and humanity in the context of contemporary life and her responses to the drama of nature.” Her work is currently featured in two group exhibitions: “Affinities for Abstraction: Women Artists on Eastern Long Island, 1950-2020” at Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, N.Y., and “Creating Community. Cinque Gallery Artists” at The Art Students League of New York. Cinque Gallery was founded by Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, and Ernest Crichlow in 1969 and operated until 2004. Carter was the first artist-in-residence at Cinque and she co-organized “Creating Community” alongside guest curator Susan Stedman. Since 2001, Carter has been a professor of art at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, N.Y. Her first solo exhibition with Berry Campbell is scheduled for spring 2022.

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News: Now Representing Nanette Carter, May 12, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Now Representing Nanette Carter

May 12, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Now Representing Nanette Carter
Exhibition Forthcoming 2022

View Works by Nanette Carter

ABOUT THE ARTIST
An artist who has been exhibiting her work nationally and internationally in numerous solo and group exhibitions since the mid-1970s, Nanette Carter creates abstract collages expressive of her sensitivity to injustice and humanity in the context of contemporary life and her responses to the drama of nature. Her shaped works, produced in multimedia on Mylar since 1997, are evocative of concepts in the history of abstract art and reflect the African American abstract art tradition, exemplified in the works of Alma Thomas, Sam Gilliam, William T. Williams, Howardina Pindell, Romare Bearden, and Alvin Loving Jr. In fact, Loving (1935–2005) was Carter’s mentor. A close friend, he inspired her in his view of invention in art as the result of process, in a manner akin to how jazz musicians create something new by riffing off of a melody.

In her art, Carter combines rectilinear structures with animated gestures, forming constructions that recall the lineage of African American quilt-making, while drawing on jazz, Japanese prints, Russian Constructivism, Abstract Expressionism, and other sources. She describes herself as a “builder, fascinated by the act of bringing pieces together to create a work of art,” while noting that “building is one of civilizations’ oldest endeavors.” In 2013 she began her Cantilevered series, metaphorically using an architectural term referring to structures anchored by a plinth at one end that extend horizontally—almost defying gravity—as a paradigm for the balancing act in all our lives in the twenty-first century. Her series, The Weight, begun in 2015, speaks to the weight “compounded on us as we reflect on our history and aspire to move forward to better ourselves.” Continue Reading

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News: The Catholic University of America | Artist Lilian Thomas Burwell: 'On a completely different line of exploration', May 11, 2021 - Kevin M. Burke for The Catholic University of America

The Catholic University of America | Artist Lilian Thomas Burwell: 'On a completely different line of exploration'

May 11, 2021 - Kevin M. Burke for The Catholic University of America

"On a completely different line of exploration:" Artist Lilian Thomas Burwell

Any other serious artist would have leapt — lock, smock, and easel — at the opportunity: a solo show at a leading private art gallery in the trendy Chelsea section of Manhattan. But at 94, and having just entertained emissaries from the Smithsonian Institutions asking about the future of her archives, Lilian Thomas Burwell, M.F.A. 1975, was comfortable taking her time.

"Well, I didn't know who they were," says Burwell of Christine Berry and Martha Campbell, owners and purveyors of the eight-year-old Berry Campbell Gallery on W. 24th Street, in the shadow of the city's popular High Line. Despite a long and productive career as both a two-dimensional painter and, for roughly the past two decades, creator of innovative three-dimensional "wall sculptures," the longtime Maryland-based artist had never before had an exhibition of her work in New York City. (Although her paintings have been exhibited at The National Museum of Women in the Arts and are included in the permanent collections of prestigious museums such as the Phillips Collection, America's first museum of modern art, both located in Washington, D.C.)

"I never had an orientation to working [at art] to make money, and I knew that I was limited in terms of experience in the market," confides Burwell, who her made her living as an art teacher while living out another "spiritual" experience as an artist. "So, I needed to know who are these people and what were they trying to do. Can I trust them?

"And at this age, I have to be realistic about what happens to my work. I may have never thought of it as a way to make money, but I don't believe in just throwing it all away, either," adds Burwell with a sly chuckle. She "absolutely" agreed to donate her records to the Smithsonian. Contained in that history are her then-design of Washington, D.C.'s public school pre-secondary art curriculum and papers from her subsequent time as a member of the visual arts faculty at Duke Ellington School of the Arts. She also served as a board member of the Smithsonian Institution Renwick Alliance and the Arlington Arts Center, founded the Alma Thomas Memorial Gallery, and was curatorial director of the Sumner Museum and Archives in Washington, D.C., from 1981 to 1984.

On the other hand, the extent and future of Burwell's personal art collection is (as every artist and art dealer knows) not a topic for public conversation.

Soaring
What she and her partner are trying to do, Christine Berry was finally able to convince a hesitant Burwell, is represent post-war American artists that they consider overlooked or neglected, often because they are women and other times due to race or geography. Earlier this year, the gallery's presentation of works by Louisiana painter and sculptor Ida Kohlmeyer (1912-1997) was reviewed by The New York Times. Berry Campbell's curatorial vision also has sparked fruitful relationships with senior curators at the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, the National Gallery of Art, and Houston's Museum of Fine Arts, among others.

"It's shocking to say and hard to believe for me, but when I first saw Lilian's work, I did not who she was, either," says Berry, an Upstate New Yorker who earned her undergraduate degree from Baylor University and a master's in art history and criticism from the University of North Texas. Her introduction to Burwell came in 2017 via the artist's inclusion in the acclaimed Magnetic Fields touring exhibition curated by Melissa Messina, the first U.S. presentation dedicated exclusively to "the formal and historical dialogue of abstraction by women artists of color."

"Really spurring me on, though, was this collector — a client of mine," Berry says. "He collects mostly African American art and had actually purchased a work from the show, and he said, 'You've got to see this woman. No one knows who she is and she does these fabulous wall sculptures.'"

What followed was a roughly yearlong courtship of Burwell by Berry Campbell, with help from Messina, who had established a relationship with the artist through Magnetic Fields. What resulted is Soaring, also curated by Messina, showcasing 15 examples from Burwell's portfolio and continuing at the gallery through May 28, 2021. The exhibition centers on the pivotal painting Skybound (1984), which marks the first time the artist cut into her canvas to create positive and negative space, and eventually leading to her now signature style of three-dimensional, painted wall sculpture.

The show's title also is an homage to the late David Driskell (1931-2020), Burwell's friend and contemporary and fellow Catholic University alum, who for many years served as Distinguished University Professor of Art at the University of Maryland. In 1997, on the occasion of Burwell’s survey exhibition at Hampton University Museum in Virginia, Driskell wrote the essay "Soaring with a Painterly Voice," in which he described Burwell's work as "transcendental in showing stylistic diversity of earthly beauty and cosmic vision."

Widely heralded for bringing African American art into greater public exposure and appreciation globally during the latter half of the 20th century, Driskell received the National Humanities Medal from President Bill Clinton in 2000. He died from coronavirus in April 2020 at the age of 88.

Got to be starting something

Asked whether her New York debut and growing reputation as an important voice in American abstract art is a "Better late than never" or "It's about time" story, Lilian Burwell looks patiently at her inquisitor through eyes that first opened in 1927 and indicates that she doesn't much care for the question, because it presumes the end of something when she has always been more interested in starting something.

"My whole motivation is I'm more of a teacher and preacher than anything else," says the grandchild of a Baptist minister, who married a Catholic and actually first arrived at CatholicU in order to study the foundations of catechism.

"If I can bring something out in you that you didn't know existed before, that's like I'm throwing a pebble in the water," she says. "It's starting something I have no idea where it's going to go. But to this day I hear things from [former] students that I had decades ago telling me one or two things I taught them that started them on a completely different line of exploration. That's worth 200 paintings to me."

Asked the same question about Burwell's ultimate arrival on the contemporary art scene, Berry says, "I think Lilian could have been a full-blown professional artist 100 percent. But, she loves teaching. So, for that reason, I don't think her work was included in as many shows, exhibitions over her life, and I think she was simply overlooked."

At the same time, says Berry, "I don't feel that there's any missed opportunity here. Lilian is somebody who, thankfully right now people are looking back at shows like Magnetic Fields and are opened to seeing beyond what is just in the canon of art history. As a woman, as a sculptor, as an African American, she fits in a lot of categories, and we have people walking in here saying to us, 'Who is this artist? Why have I never heard of her? These are fantastic!'

"I think this is the right time for her."

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News: Artnet News | 50 Years Ago, Romare Bearden and His Colleagues Founded a New York Gallery for Artists of Color. A New Show Celebrates Its Legacy, May  6, 2021 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

Artnet News | 50 Years Ago, Romare Bearden and His Colleagues Founded a New York Gallery for Artists of Color. A New Show Celebrates Its Legacy

May 6, 2021 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

The show explores the gallery's ties to the Art Students League of New York.

In 1969, tired of the lack of exhibition opportunities for Black artists, Romare BeardenErnest Crichlow, and Norman Lewis took matters into their own hands and opened Cinque Gallery, a nonprofit exhibition space on Astor Place in New York’s East Village.

Cinque—named for Joseph Cinque, who led the 1839 revolt on the Amistad slave ship after being kidnapped in Sierra Leone—quickly became a thriving community of young and mid-career artists.

Over its 35-year existence at various spaces across the city, the organization showcased the work of some 450 artists of color, including Emma AmosDawoud BeySam Gilliam, and Whitfield Lovell—all of whom are featured in the first-ever exhibition celebrating the legacy of Cinque Gallery at the Art Students League of New York.

Read Full Article

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News: Parrish Art Museum | Eric Dever | Creative Studio: Field of Dreams: Objects in Space, April 28, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum

Parrish Art Museum | Eric Dever | Creative Studio: Field of Dreams: Objects in Space

April 28, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum

CREATIVE STUDIO

With Eric Dever
May 2, 1 pm - 2:30 pm

Field of Dreams: Objects in Space

Join artist Eric Dever for this Creative Studio for Adults and Teens. This month we will paint outdoors; experience scale and proportion as a means of interpreting the Museum meadow and sculpture exhibition, Field of Dreams.

Everyone will have their own workspace and materials. Materials will be provided.

Preregistration is required. Space is limited.

$35 Non-members | $25 Members

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News: DIGITAL SCREENING | Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson and Lilian Thomas Burwell, April 28, 2021 - Berry Campbell

DIGITAL SCREENING | Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson and Lilian Thomas Burwell

April 28, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Wednesday, April 28, 2021 
4 pm - 10 pm

Watch Here
(Link will be live April 28, 2021 4 pm - 10 pm)

Next Screening:
Saturday, May 8, 2021
1 pm - 5 pm

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News: We Know What We Like, April 27, 2021 - Triangle Arts Association

We Know What We Like

April 27, 2021 - Triangle Arts Association

We Know What We Like is an entertaining conversation featuring three experts in contemporary art discussing some of the most exciting artwork being made today by Triangle alumni and others.

FREE
Tuesday, May 18 at 7 PM EST
On Zoom
Afterparty 8:30 PM

Register

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News: Frank Wimberley and Nanette Carter in Conversation for "Creating Community, Cinque Gallery Artists", April 20, 2021 - Art Students League

Frank Wimberley and Nanette Carter in Conversation for "Creating Community, Cinque Gallery Artists"

April 20, 2021 - Art Students League

Artist Frank Wimberley, who is featured in the Art Students League's upcoming exhibition Creating Community. Cinque Gallery Artistswill be in conversation with Nanette Carter, artist and Guest Program Curator, in the upcoming program this Wednesday, April 21. Wimberley began exhibiting at the Cinque Gallery in 1982 and is considered an important figure in the history of African American art, acclaimed for his dynamic, multi-layered style of painting. His work is found in many museum and corporate collections. When it premieres on Wednesday, the video will be available on the Art Students League's website.

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News: Frank Wimberley Featured in Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: March/April 2021, April  8, 2021 - Two Coats of Paint

Frank Wimberley Featured in Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: March/April 2021

April 8, 2021 - Two Coats of Paint




Frank Wimberley: Collage
March 18 - April 17, 2021

More Information

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News: Frank Wimberley | 5 Artists in the Artnet Gallery Network That We're Watching This April, April  3, 2021 - Artnet Gallery Network

Frank Wimberley | 5 Artists in the Artnet Gallery Network That We're Watching This April

April 3, 2021 - Artnet Gallery Network

Frank Wimberley at Berry Campbell, New York

Frank Wimberley, Untitled (Collage) (1977). Courtesy of Berry Campbell.
Frank Wimberley, Untitled (Collage) (1977). Courtesy of Berry Campbell.

At 94 years old, Frank Wimberley has been working, mostly under the radar, since the 1960s, creating dynamic, layered, abstract paintings. Over the decades, the artist has attracted a devoted set of followers on the East End of Long Island, where he has a home, while his importance as a Black artist working in the tradition of Abstract Expressionism has increasingly been recognized (his art was included in Hunter College’s important 2018 exhibition revisiting the 1971 exhibition “Rebuttal to the Whitney Museum Exhibition: Black Artists in Rebuttal”). Wimberly likens his process to a controlled accident, and creates his paintings with equal parts intention and improvisation, citing the traditions of jazz.

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News: Culture Type | At 93, Lilian Thomas Burwell is Making Her Solo Debut in New York Where Her Artwork Will Be on View at Berry Campbell Gallery, March 30, 2021 - Victoria L.Valentine for Culture Type

Culture Type | At 93, Lilian Thomas Burwell is Making Her Solo Debut in New York Where Her Artwork Will Be on View at Berry Campbell Gallery

March 30, 2021 - Victoria L.Valentine for Culture Type

STILL PUSHING HER PRACTICE to new heights, Lilian Thomas Burwell will have her first New York solo exhibition at age 93. “Lilian Thomas Burwell: Soaring” opens April 22 at Berry Campbell Gallery.

An abstract artist, Burwell makes nature-inspired paintings and sculpture. She was featured in “Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today,” a groundbreaking exhibition presenting works by 21 Black female artists that originated at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City and traveled to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Fla., from 2017 to 2018. Burwell is also the subject of a recent documentary, “Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell.”

Guest curated by Melissa Messina, “Soaring” explores a pivotal period in Burwell’s creative development. The exhibition “highlights the dynamic transition in Burwell’s abstract visual language from two-dimensional painterly planes to three-dimensional sculptural forms. Burwell’s paintings from the late 1970s and early 1980s employ a distinctly bold palette and reference organic forms found in natural floral and earthly phenomena,” according to the gallery.

“The exhibition centers on the painting Skybound (1984), which marks the first time that the artist cut into her canvas, creating positive and negative space. This pivotal act gave way to Burwell’s examination of form, bringing forth Burwell’s signature style of three-dimensional, painted wall sculpture. These wall sculptures would become the artist’s signature focus for more than two decades.”

“Burwell’s paintings from the late 1970s and early 1980s employ a distinctly bold palette and reference organic forms found in natural floral and earthly phenomena.” — Berry Campbell Gallery

BORN IN WASHINGTON, D.C., Burwell grew up in Harlem and attended New York’s High School of Music and Art. Still struggling to recover from the Depression, her family returned to the nation’s capital and she graduated from segregated Dunbar High School.

Burwell attended Pratt in New York City and later earned an MFA from Catholic University in Washington (1975). After working as a publications and exhibits specialist at the Department of Commerce, she became a master teacher of art in the D.C. public schools. She taught from 1967-1980, the last five years at Duke Ellington School of the Arts.

The documentary “Kindred Spirits” focuses on Burwell and her aunt, her mother’s oldest sister, Hilda Wilkinson Brown. Based in Washington, Brown was a teacher and an artist who made modernist paintings with local scenes as her subject. Burwell said Brown was like a mother to her. She supported her desire to become an artist and convinced her parents to let her pursue it.

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News: Artist Frank Wimberley, at 94, is still full of surprises, March  3, 2021 - Troy McMullen for ABC News

Artist Frank Wimberley, at 94, is still full of surprises

March 3, 2021 - Troy McMullen for ABC News

New York -- In 2005, on the eve of a solo show of his work in Southampton, N.Y., the abstract artist Frank Wimberley explained that he often viewed his artwork as living things. Giving a painting “time to breathe,” was an important part of the creative process, he said, adding that it wasn’t uncommon for him to step away from a work in progress. “Then you can return to it, just like with any living, breathing thing, and find a few surprises.”

At 94 years old, Wimberley is still uncovering surprises in an expanding body of work infused with bold colors and dramatic, gestural strokes. In a career that has spanned more than 50 years, and that includes paintings, sculptures, and ceramics, he’s managed to embrace the creative process as a continuous adventure.

This month Berry Campbell Gallery in New York’s Chelsea district is hosting a survey exhibition of collage works by Wimberley that will feature both paintings with collage elements as well as traditional collage works on paper.

(Take a gallery tour of the artwork with Frank Wimberley here.)

The show, to be held March 18 to April 17, will also highlight some of the artist’s most important collages to date, including several examples going back to the early 1970s, says gallery co-owner, Christine Berry. She opened the 2,000 square-foot ground floor gallery and exhibition space with Martha Campbell in 2013 with a focus on Postwar Modern and Contemporary Art.

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News: Artist of the week | eazel highlights: Mary Dill Henry (1913 - 2009), March  3, 2021 - Eazel

Artist of the week | eazel highlights: Mary Dill Henry (1913 - 2009)

March 3, 2021 - Eazel

Mary Dill Henry (1913 - 2009)

Mary Dill Henry’s most notable works are in large oil paintings, alongside acrylics and prints; they are characterized by geometric abstraction. Henry built a signature style, synthesizing past and present art movements into bold and striking compositions.

A rare exhibition of paintings from 1965 to 1970 is on show at Berry Campbell Gallery, New York, titled Mary Dill Henry: Love Jazz (Feb 11 - Mar 13, 2021). Works from this period include oscillating shapes form kinetic patterns and Op Art illusions. This qulity can be seen in works such as Love Jazz (1965), same title as the exhibition, which represents two abstract hearts that seem to beat together in rhythmic unison with the variously striped patterns that both unite and divide them; that daringly juxtaposed colors arrest the eye with the immediacy of Pop Art.

The most significant influence on her practice occurred in the mid-1940s, while studying at the Institute of Design in Chicago with the Bauhaus teacher and visionary, László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946). Studying under Moholy-Nagy exposed Henry to the illustrious history of the Bauhaus and its many manifestations. At the Institute, she pursued the full Bauhaus curriculum, receiving training in photography, architecture, and design.

After receiving an MA at the Institute of Design in Chicago, Henry was offered technical positions from several schools. However, the cultural atmosphere at the time normalized women to follow men’s career over their own; so Henry moved whenever her husband’s work required them to relocate. Although Henry was a serious artist and had regular exhibitions, she kept a low profile. In 1966, liberation from the marriage enabled Henry to focus on her art, although it meant she had to deal with financial struggles to a certain extent.

“It was as if, after 20 years of fulfilling conventional expectations as a wife, worker, and mother, she was released into a constant stream of creative production, capturing the exuberant hedonism of Northern California, while reined in by the consummate formal control she had assimilated as an American Constructivist in Chicago.” 
- from Matthew Kangas’ review of Mary Dill Henry’s first solo exhibition at Arleigh Gallery, San Francisco (Artforum, 1969)

Through her artworks, Henry showed the utopian ideals associated with Constructivism, as well the principle behind de Stijl movement; that art and life are inseparable. Although influenced by these movements, Henry expressed more idiosyncratic and humorous constructive patterns in her works. She achieved a beauty of form that transcends the ordinary and gave joy and surprise to the eye. Henry’s consideration of contemplative spaces speaks to the viewer with energy and insight, while her sense of humor is also evident. 

“Art sustains us when the chaos of the world with its wars and depressions engulf us. And the bright hope of humanity to know that even in the midst of such hopelessness, we can and do create art that can lift and inspire.” 
- Mary Dill Henry

Mary Dill Henry: Love Jazz at Berry Campbell Gallery, New York (Feb 11 - Mar 13, 2021)

Starting from her first solo exhibition in 1967, Henry participated in hundreds of shows. Since 1980, seven retrospective exhibitions have been held in California, including several museum shows. Among many honors, she received a Flintridge Award for Visual Artists in 2001 and the Twining Humber Award for Lifetime Achievement, from the Artist Trust, in Seattle, in 2006.

Henry’s paintings belong to many public collections, including the Seattle Art Museum; the Frye Art Museum, Seattle; the Whatcom Museum, Bellingham, Washington; the Tacoma Art Museum; the University of Puget Sound, Tacoma; the Portland Art Museum, Oregon; the Sheldon Art Museum, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; and the Institute of Design, Chicago, as well as corporate art collections, including Microsoft, Safeco, Ampex, Varian Associates, and Hewlett-Packard. 

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News: The Fairfield University Art Museum Announces Major Gift of Artwork by Artist Stephen Pace, February 13, 2021 - Fairfield University Art Museum

The Fairfield University Art Museum Announces Major Gift of Artwork by Artist Stephen Pace

February 13, 2021 - Fairfield University Art Museum

The Fairfield University Art Museum has received a major gift of more than 130 paintings, watercolors, drawings, prints, and sketchbooks from the Stephen and Palmina Pace Foundation.

The Fairfield University Art Museum is pleased to announce that the Stephen and Palmina Pace Foundation has gifted more than 132 works by Stephen Pace (American, 1918-2010) to the museum, with outstanding examples from across the artist’s oeuvre.

Stephen Pace was born in Missouri in 1918 to a farming family. He began his formal art training at the age of 17, studying drawing and watercolor with WPA artist and illustrator Robert Lahr. He continued to hone his skills while serving abroad during World War II, painting views of European landscapes. Pace’s early works are represented in this gift by a very early and accomplished watercolor of a farm scene from his childhood in Missouri. After WWII, Pace studied art on the GI Bill at the Instituto Allende in San Miguel Allende, Mexico before he made his way to New York City. This period is represented by a lovely oil painting of the Mexican desert landscape looking towards San Miguel Allende.

In 1947, Pace moved to New York City where he continued his art studies on the GI Bill at the Art Students League and developed important friendships with members of the New York School of Abstract Expressionist. Still lifes, nudes, and early abstractions are among the works included in the gift from this period. Pace used the last of his GI bill funds to study with the renowned abstract expressionist artist and teacher Hans Hofmann, in New York and then in Provincetown, Mass. Hofmann had an immediately visible influence on Pace’s work in the 1950s, particularly in Pace’s use of color planes to describe volume.

During the 1950s, Stephen was singled out by Hofmann as one of the finest painters to emerge from the second generation of abstract expressionists. During his long career, Pace made important contributions to the tradition of Abstract Expressionism. This period of abstract expressionism is represented by several important paintings, as well as numerous watercolors, prints, and drawings.

In 1960, Pace returned to painting more figural subjects in a style characterized by simplified forms and imaginative colors, and this remained the focus of his artistic practice for the remainder of his career. Returning to his rural roots, Pace’s work begins to depict subjects ranging from gardening and nudes, to horses and lobstermen. The gift to Fairfield includes all of these subjects, and is particularly strong in paintings of horses — one of Pace’s favorite subjects.

The donated works collectively are very important because they demonstrate Pace’s process in moving from studies to finished works. Pace's artwork will be well-used in teaching across disciplines, especially in Studio Art and Art History classes.

Three of the gifted works by Pace are among those in the current Fairfield University Art Museum (FUAM) exhibition in Bellarmine Hall Galleries, The Birds of the Northeast: Gulls to Great Auks: an ink drawing of a Great Blue Heron, and a watercolor and a lithograph of Herring Gulls. A full exhibition of Pace’s work is in the planning stages.

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News: Air Mail: Arts Intel Report | Mary Dill Henry: Love Jazz, February 13, 2021 - J.V. for Air Mail

Air Mail: Arts Intel Report | Mary Dill Henry: Love Jazz

February 13, 2021 - J.V. for Air Mail

The 20th-century artist Mary Dill Henry (1913–2009) flouted expectation with great seriousness. She left her role as a housewife to focus on her art, even if that meant being short on cash. She lived in Mendocino, a sleepy northern-California town with little culture but plenty of visual inspiration. She was influenced by the work of the Bauhaus visionary Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, as well as by Piet Mondrian. She was touched by Constructivism and Op art. But she painted in a style of exuberant precision that was completely her own. “Love Jazz” brings Henry’s bright, joyous pieces into focus after many decades spent out of the public eye. —J.V.

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News: Perle Fine | Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg receives 5 masterpieces on loan, February 13, 2021 - Maggie Duffy for Tampa Bay Times

Perle Fine | Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg receives 5 masterpieces on loan

February 13, 2021 - Maggie Duffy for Tampa Bay Times

ST. PETERSBURG — The Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg’s major renovation of their permanent collection galleries last fall made the museum feel like a new place.

Now, through a yearlong sharing collaboration, four paintings from the Art Bridges Collection by celebrated 20th century American artists are on display in the museum’s Modern and Post War galleries.

Works by Jacob Lawrence, Hughie Lee-Smith, Norman Wilfred Lewis and Lee Krasner will remain on display through February 2022. A fifth painting by Marsden Hartley will arrive in June and remain on view through August 2022.

The loans expand the museum’s inclusivity with works by Black, female and LGBTQ artists.

 
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News: Exhibition Feature: Docent's Corner | Ida Kohlmeyer, February 11, 2021 - Kat Leahey for Blowing Rock Art & History Museum

Exhibition Feature: Docent's Corner | Ida Kohlmeyer

February 11, 2021 - Kat Leahey for Blowing Rock Art & History Museum



I love, love, love this Ida Kohlmeyer painting! The colors, the brush strokes and most of all the meditative, serene feeling I experience while looking at it.

Ida Kohlmeyer was an American painter and sculptor who lived and worked in Louisiana. She took up painting in her 30’s and achieved wide recognition for her art in museums and galleries throughout the United States.

After receiving her MFA from Tulane University in 1956, she taught for seven years and was a portrait painter of children. Wanting more inspiration and a deeper meaning in life, she became a student during a summer at Hans Hofmann’s Abstract Expressive Arts School in Provincetown, Massachusetts. She was also a student and friend of Mark Rothko. In her words, she came to realize “Painting need not be a painting of something, not an imitation, but should be a revelation to the viewer and artist. It need not be instructional or socially critical. The support, (in this case, masonite) is flat, so a little bit of depth may be needed, misty/atmospheric usually - not perspective wise. Work progresses by unconscious impulses, one color calling for another, one shape after another.”

Why are we attracted to non-representational or object free art? Expressive Abstract art frees our brain from the dominance of reality, enabling the brain to flow within its inner states, create new emotional and cognitive associations and activate brain-states that are otherwise harder to access. This process is rewarding as it enables the exploration of yet undiscovered inner territories of the viewer’s brain.

Kohlmeyer’s painting is part of Brahm’s permanent collection and is currently on the upper level. Come relax, restore and rejuvenate!

This Docent’s Corner is brought to you by Kat Leahey

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News: Eric Dever | Creative Studio Online : Figuration and Abstraction in Drawing and Painting, February  9, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum

Eric Dever | Creative Studio Online : Figuration and Abstraction in Drawing and Painting

February 9, 2021 - Parrish Art Museum


Join Eric Dever live from the Parrish studio in this online workshop for adults and teens.

This month we will create drawings and paintings that explore the dual means of representation and abstraction.

Contact Information:
Cara Conklin-Wingfield
631-283-2118
Children@parrishart.org

Where:
Parrish Art Museum
279 Montauk Hwy
Water Mill

Website:
www.parrishart.org

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News: Whitehot Magazine: Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase at Berry Campebll, February  9, 2021 - Cori Hutchinson for Whitehot Magazine

Whitehot Magazine: Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase at Berry Campebll

February 9, 2021 - Cori Hutchinson for Whitehot Magazine

Jill Nathanson, a lifelong advocate of Color Field abstraction, wields a bright turn of phrase in her third Berry Campbell exhibition, expressing important feelings about color, proximity, and concord. Noticing the disruption of my fingers, an additional element, through Nathanson’s painting thumbnails on a checklist printed on thin paper was enough to convince me of the sheer power of the work exhibited here in which all layers on flat wooden panels sum to a fully multi-dimensional space. The acoustic quality of the paintings, hinted at by select titles (Harp, Chordzephyr, Woodwind), is heard as a result of this spatial illusion. The painter’s biographical information, and particularly her upbringing in a musical household, furthers this reading of her work. 

The paintings reach deep rhythms and rich harmonies with their expansive palettes and chiffon likeness. In Only a Friend, Nathanson mixes a platonic ideal of bleached apricot and buttery daffodil shades in the center with flanks of bubbly gray-blue and still sea-glass. If briefly considered a landscape, the viewer is unable to differentiate between window and curtains, resulting in pleasing surface tension, each edge becoming a true crevice rather than a point of delineation. An oily olive ribbon to the right, likely applied post-pour, suggests a moment of organic activity, such as the drag of a wave onto coast. 

Nathanson’s implemented notion of “color desire” similarly tugs on the viewer as one’s gaze travels across each work; the painter is uniquely aware of the somatic effects of art and its relationship to pulse. Flexing works such as Light Wrestle provoke a push-and-pull response. This active relationship with the panels is determined by the immaterial energy itself of each field, as well as the muscle required by the artist to physically handle and manipulate the materials. 

The depth created is also, in part, due to the predetermined clarity of color. Hardly ever in these paintings is there muddying despite the elaborate entanglement and overlap. Nathanson’s distinct style of color mixing yields results such as in Sparkshift, where an overlay of Baldwin apple red and powder blue does not produce purple, but instead each color remains true to itself, fulfilling the tall order of being two things at once. This technique recalls Walter Benjamin’s fragment “A Child’s View of Color,” translated by Rodney Livingstone, wherein he writes, “Color is single, not as a lifeless thing and a rigid individuality but as a winged creature that flits from one form to the next.” What is the putty pink on the right side of the panel if not a pure mood? Color in Nathanson’s work, animate, playful, pure, is described well by this Benjamin text. 

One of several paintings whose phrase-titles fall within the realm of magic is Elixir, which blends something like a magnetic binary composition with one blue tail crossing the center near the bottom. A potion of improbability and convergence, symmetry despite asymmetry, the planes in this painting stretch beyond the viewer’s belief. rising to an exercise in spirit. 

As a series, these works play with doubling. Trickster color combinations improbably defy form similarity among like-forms. Elixir and Sway ChorusLight Wrestle and Sparkshift, & Going Goya and Harp are among these form-doubles. Unexpectedly, the expert color manipulation by the artist increases visible relationality between palettes rather than forms, forcing kinship between, for example, the cool palettes of Only a Friend and Getting Light.  

Getting Light is more reminiscent of earlier Nathanson works such as those shown at MOCA Jacksonville in 2016: kaleidoscopic, radial, and gathered in a single, sometimes centered, origin point. The language of graphs is handily applied to this work as each panel undulates and crests according to its respective lightwaves. Tan Transpose, citrusy and dappled, mathematical in title and form, shades in the gaps between two plotted lines on a Y-axis. The “sine” curves here, and in many of the compositions shown, distinguish this series, mapping a rate of color and, ultimately, gaining momentum.  

In one interview, Nathanson refers to her practice as “pseudo-spontaneous,” as she realizes and tapes off the shape of each color before it is poured, then waits a full day for each color to dry. The gradual and rewarding viewing experience of the paintings is owed to this process, sloping and seeping at its own willful, radiant pace. WM

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News: Lilian Burwell | New documentary highlights two local Black women artists who persevered against segregation and innovated DC’s art scene, February  6, 2021 - Kelly McDonell for The DC Line

Lilian Burwell | New documentary highlights two local Black women artists who persevered against segregation and innovated DC’s art scene

February 6, 2021 - Kelly McDonell for The DC Line

When documentary filmmaker Cintia Cabib was showcasing two films at the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.’s 2014 conference on local history, she spotted an intriguing painting of the corner of Rhode Island Avenue and 3rd Street NW while perusing a small brochure. The modernist, geometric red hues of homes lining the LeDroit Park street and a gleaming, leafless tree bisecting the frame compelled Cabib to explore the work of the artist, Hilda Wilkinson Brown.

Years of research culminated in a new documentary produced and directed by Cabib called Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell. The short film is being broadcast locally by PBS stations WHUT and MPT on Feb. 4 and by WETA’s World Channel on Feb. 10. PBS stations around the country have scheduled airings of the film for Black History Month programming

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News: Translucence: Jill Nathanson at Berry Campbell, February  6, 2021 - Piri Halasz for Artcritical

Translucence: Jill Nathanson at Berry Campbell

February 6, 2021 - Piri Halasz for Artcritical

A veteran of more than 20 solo exhibitions in New York since her 1982 debut, and nearly 30 group shows since 1980 from Massachusetts to Florida, Jill Nathanson is entitled to be counted as a heavyweight in the art scene. Ironic, therefore, that her latest show is so striking for its light, airy, almost translucent qualities, its diaphanous veils of color rooted in both science and imagination.

She learned the ABC’s of color from Kenneth Noland and Larry Poons on an informal basis in the late 1970s and early 1980s when an undergraduate at Bennington College, Vermont. Neither of these painters was on the faculty, however, and Nathanson once told me that many and maybe most of her fellow Bennington art students were making paintings that looked more like Helen Frankenthaler – Bennington’s most famous alumna – with whom Nathanson wanted her paintings to have nothing to do. And although there may be some remote similarities, the glossier-looking finish of Nathanson’s paintings and the distinctive shapes in them have long stamped them with an artistic personality entirely her own.

Nathanson’s technique differs from those used by color-field painters in the 1960s, though it employs “modelli” (preparatory studies) and in this somewhat resembles the “modelli” that Friedel Dzubas employed in the later 1970s and ‘80s. But Dzubas didn’t invent modelli. Their use goes back to the Renaissance, if not earlier. And the materials that Nathanson employs are right up to the minute – as is her abstract idiom.

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News: The New Criterion | The Critic's Notebook: Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase, February  2, 2021 - James Panero for The New Criterion

The New Criterion | The Critic's Notebook: Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase

February 2, 2021 - James Panero for The New Criterion

“Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase,” at Berry Campbell Gallery, New York (through February 6): Anyone who has ever mixed colorful paints will notice that the results are not brighter colors but duller murkiness. That’s color theory 101. In her alchemical experiments with pigments and polymers, Jill Nathanson looks for ways to prove color theory wrong. Through abstractions created of translucent layers of acrylic, polymers, and oil, which she pours onto panels, Nathanson brings out the light of her color-filled combinations. In “Light Phrase,” her latest exhibition at Berry Campbell Gallery, in Chelsea, Nathanson looks to enlarge and refine her fluid forms. The artist Christina Kee provides an essay for the online catalogue that further explains Nathanson’s unusual process. —JP

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News: HASTA: Frederick J. Brown 1945 - 2021, February  2, 2021 - Katie Bono for HASTA

HASTA: Frederick J. Brown 1945 - 2021

February 2, 2021 - Katie Bono for HASTA

Frederick J. Brown had an incredibly prolific career throughout which he moved fluently between abstraction, figurative painting (particularly portraiture), landscape painting, ceramics and collage. Particularly in his early career many of his vivid and evocative brushstrokes recall de Kooning: Brown’s longtime mentor. In fact, Brown famously painted de Kooning, depicting him in bold swaths of primary color that recall de Kooning’s own style and eclectic personality. Early on in Brown’s career he was particularly influenced by de Kooning and the German school of Abstract Expressionism. After his early abstract works in the 1970s, Brown began to introduce figuration into his work in the 1980s. While most of his career did have a largely figurative focus, the emotive influence of Abstract Expressionism carries through the body of his works.  

Brown was born in Georgia on February 6th, 1945 and grew up on the South Side of Chicago. He credited his family for surrounding him with color; his uncle repainted cars (Brown would help him mix the paints) and his mother was a baker who specialized in cake decorating. His mother’s influence in particular caused Brown to have quite a tactile relationship with color and he claimed that painters were “people who love paint” particularly the feeling of paint. Another formative influence was the community of jazz musicians that Brown met through his father. Brown’s relationship with music cannot be overstated; his bold, vigorous works often produce synesthetic experiences and Brown listened to music while he painted, citing it as a creative catalyst for his painting process. He attended Southern Illinois University where he studied art and psychology.  

In 1970, Brown moved to SoHo to pursue his painting career. At this point he was focused on musical and abstract influences. In 1977 he collaborated with the Adler Planetarium to produce his wonderful work Milky Way that exemplified the galaxy as it was understood in the late 70s. He hints at the spiral shapes of the galaxy while imploring the viewer to imagine other aspects of the Milky Way. This work and several of the studies leading up to it showcase his aforementioned tactile relationship with paint and color. Dabs of paint throughout Milky Way almost inspire a visual sense of touch. Another painting of his, Elephant Skin was actually painted so that the paint itself would feel like an elephant’s skin. Brown’s idea that anyone could even feel one of his paintings was indicative of his egalitarian approach to art. In 1985, Brown taught in China at the Central College of Fine Arts and Crafts - during his teaching he sought to embody what he considered to be an authentic American experience. He imported his entire studio and would work for 13 hours at a time to give his students an idea of the intensity of his process. His teaching experience was followed by an exhibition of his works in 1988 at the Museum of the Revolution in Beijing. He was one of the earliest Western artists to exhibit in China and at the time he was the largest exhibition of a Western artist to date. He was commended for the moving sense of his works and was an exemplar of cross-cultural relations at the time. 

In the late 1980s, Brown began a series of portraits of jazz musicians. This series was significant in the sense that it exemplified the excellence of Black musicians and demonstrated Brown’s own excellence as a Black painter. It was on Brown’s part, an effort to make sure these artists were appropriately memorialized. Brown would listen to the artist’s music as he painted their portrait and this influenced the visuals of the painting. In his work Duke Ellington, Duke’s large and soulful eyes are the immediate striking characteristic. But if one takes into account the surprising pockets of color (the blue tones at the base of his eye, the red across one cheek, and the dash of yellow on his bottom lip) and the erratic curves that constitute his face, both these elements are reflective of the erratic and surprising nature of Ellington’s compositions. Another portrait Brown painted, Sarah Vaughan is a contrast to Ellington’s portrait. Vaughan’s face is all vibrant color and smooth elegant lines that recall the cadence of her voice. In her rendition of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” it is quite clear how her voice translates to her portrait.  

Beyond these projects, Brown worked on a number of spiritual and religious works and reworked common themes like the Last Judgement and the Virgin and Child. He painted a number of bright folklore-like works that were simply meant to inspire joy after his experience in a drab hospital - it showed his propensity to use art as a vehicle for an emotional experience in the viewer. Another notable work of his, History of Art is a series of over 100 canvases representing important paintings in Art History. The series effectively recasts the monochrome canon of Art History into a vibrant and diverse set of new subjects. Many of the works are either infused with new vigor or feature people of color in portraiture. Brown said once in an interview to the Smithsonian: “I think my heritage has a great significance to the images I produce, but you can limit people with a name or a title to only serve one group. When you see my work, you can tell it is done by someone who is Black. But, I want to provide as many beautiful things to the world as I possibly can.” Indeed, Brown’s wide artistic achievements left a legacy of accessibility and facilitated a democratization of art. Frederick J. Brown died of cancer in 2012 and is survived by his wife Megan and his two children. 

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Yvonne Thomas: American Women in Florence

January 23, 2021 - John Hooper for The Wall Street Journal

Collector Christian Levett has filled his Italian palazzo with a world-class assembly of works by female Abstract Expressionists.

Spread over two floors of a palazzo beside the River Arno in Florence, amid the treasures of the Italian Renaissance, is perhaps the world’s largest private collection of art by modern female abstractionists.

Walking down the street you would never know it was there. Even if you knew the name of the collector, former hedge-fund manager Christian Levett, you would have to squint long and hard to find it in the cluster of little brass name plates alongside the palazzo’s massive door. But once across the threshold you are surrounded by paintings by Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell and other Abstract Expressionists who helped revolutionize art after World War II, turning New York City into the capital of Western culture for the first time.

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MUSEUM ACQUISITION:Yvonne Thomas Acquired by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

January 23, 2021 - Berry Campbell

Yvonne Thomas
Portrait, 1956
oil on linen
96.5 x 114.3 cm (38 x 45 in.)
National Gallery of Art, Washington
Gift of Estate of Yvonne Thomas
2020.22.1
© Estate of Yvonne Thomas
Courtesy Berry Campbell Gallery, New York

Yvonne Thomas (1913–2009) is among several important artists from the abstract expressionist era, many of them women, who have been rediscovered in recent years. Portrait (1956), a pivotal work in Thomas’s career, is the first of her paintings to enter the Gallery’s collection and joins an untitled screenprint from 1967.


In 1938 Thomas studied fine art at the Art Students League of New York as well as with Amédée Ozenfant in his atelier. She began to associate with the abstract expressionists, joining discussions at The Club (where she was one of the few members who were women) and at the short-lived school called The Subjects of the Artist. She also studied in Provincetown with Hans Hofmann and exhibited at the renowned Ninth Street Exhibition in 1951. Throughout her work, she combined the gestural language of the New York School painters with sensitive brushstrokes and a lyrical sense of color. In Portrait, the ghostly figurative suggestions and tinted grays evoke an image coming into focus. The painting resonates with works by Judith Godwin, Jack Tworkov, and Frank Lobdell in the Gallery’s collection.

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News: Stephen Pace, Ann Purcell, Syd Solomon featured in, "In The Abstract" at Dowling Walsh Gallery, January 17, 2021 - Dowling Walsh Gallery

Stephen Pace, Ann Purcell, Syd Solomon featured in, "In The Abstract" at Dowling Walsh Gallery

January 17, 2021 - Dowling Walsh Gallery

In The Abstract
Dowling Walsh Gallery, Rockland, Maine
January 15 - April 24, 2021
More Information

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News: NYC-ARTS Top Five Picks | Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase, January  9, 2021 - NYC-ARTS

NYC-ARTS Top Five Picks | Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase

January 9, 2021 - NYC-ARTS

Jill Nathanson, Light's Cover, 2019, acrylic and polymers with oil on panel, 38 1/4 x 74 inches


Jill Nathanson: Light Phrase

Thu, Jan 07, 2021 - Sat, Feb 06, 2021

More Information

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News: Game changers: Visual artists adapt to the COVID era | Mike Solomon, January  9, 2021 - Marty Fugate, Correspondent

Game changers: Visual artists adapt to the COVID era | Mike Solomon

January 9, 2021 - Marty Fugate, Correspondent



The art game has many unwritten rules. It’s a good thing that nobody wrote them down.

COVID-19 trashed the artistic rulebook as it has nearly everything else in contemporary life. Artists and visual arts institutions have been flying by the seat of their pants since the pandemic hit last year. While strange changes are far from over in the art game, here are some of the new ad hoc rules area artists and arts leaders have invented to keep playing. We’ll start with a few individual artists.

Mike Solomon: Honor the Heroes

The bulk of Mike Solomon’s work is nonrepresentational. But his latest series of colored pencil drawings holds a mirror to the real world.

“Scenes from the Pandemic” has a journalistic feel to it. The title tells you exactly what to expect. There are a few scenes of wounded journalists and protestors of all ethnic origins. But most of Solomon’s drawings celebrate Black doctors, nurses and front-line caregivers dealing with the collateral damage of the battle against COVID-19.

These heroes include Dr. James A Mahoney – a Brooklyn pulmonologist who pulled all-nighters fighting the virus, and then became a victim himself; Dr. Armen Henderson, a Miami internist who was handcuffed and detained by police outside his home; and Dr. Lisa Merritt, the founder and director of the Multicultural Health Institute in Sarasota.

“I made a connection with Lisa at the beginning of this year,” Solomon says. “She enlightened me a lot about what was going on in the African American community. Thanks to her, I became fascinated with the Black doctors and first responders serving on the front lines during the pandemic. Like all doctors, they risk their own lives to save the lives of others. But if these doctors take off their scrubs and walk outside the hospital – they’re taking a risk just because of the color of their skin. It takes an amazing amount of courage to do what they do. I wanted to find a way to honor it.”

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News: Berry Campbell Now Representing the Estate of Frederick J. Brown, December  9, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Now Representing the Estate of Frederick J. Brown

December 9, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is pleased to announce the representation of the Estate of Frederick J. Brown (1945-2012)

Exhibition formcoming September 9 - October 9, 2021
Curated by Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims

View Works by Frederick J. Brown

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News: James Walsh featured on Paint Stories with Mark Golden Podcast, December  3, 2020 - Paint Stories with Mark Golden Podcast

James Walsh featured on Paint Stories with Mark Golden Podcast

December 3, 2020 - Paint Stories with Mark Golden Podcast

News: Berry Campbell Featured in 100 Standout Works from Miami Art Fairs, December  2, 2020 - Artsy

Berry Campbell Featured in 100 Standout Works from Miami Art Fairs

December 2, 2020 - Artsy

100 Standout Works from Miami Art Fairs

From Kehinde Wiley’s newest portrait to a playful sculpture by Austin Lee, browse a curated selection of 100 new-to-market works from your favorite artists, on view now during Miami Fair Week. For more from the Miami fairs, browse the online catalogues of Art Miami and CONTEXT Art Miami—hosted exclusively on Artsy—as well as Art Basel Miami BeachPRIZM, and UNTITLED, ART.

 

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News: Berry Campbell Now Exclusively Representing the Estate of Mary Dill Henry, November 17, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Now Exclusively Representing the Estate of Mary Dill Henry

November 17, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Now Representing the Estate of Mary Dill Henry
Berry Campbell is pleased to announce the exclusive representation of the Estate of Mary Dill Henry (1913-2009).
Exhibition forthcoming February 2021

About the Artist
View Works by Mary Dill Henry

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News: Frank Wimberley | Long Islanders share memories of serving in World War II, November 11, 2020 - Merle English for Newsday

Frank Wimberley | Long Islanders share memories of serving in World War II

November 11, 2020 - Merle English for Newsday

THE TRANSPORT BUSINESS

Frank Wimberley’s military engagement began as a private assigned to the 3384th Quartermaster Truck Company. Said Wimberly, "I never did any fighting. I did a lot of transporting troops and shipping supplies to areas where there was fighting." Because Black men could only serve in segregated units of the military, many were assigned to labor and service units.

Wimberley was happy with his assignment, however. "I liked that job; I liked being in a foreign country," he said. "We were very much liked by the Germans because we were Black; they liked the fact that they were meeting a different kind of American."

He said he suffered some of the hostility directed at Blacks by some whites, "even in the U.S. military," Wimberley remarked.

"The Black soldiers in my unit were always segregated from the whites. White soldiers would show animosity to us."

"You’re always going to find some problem makers, especially in the service," he said, "but I enjoyed my stay over there."

Encounters between Blacks and Germans were mostly social, Wimberley said. "A lot of the guys had German girlfriends," he said. "Everybody was poor because of the war; they would fix dinners for us. They had to go on the farms and steal food."

He described how a shared love of music fostered camaraderie among the Black soldiers. "We would form little groups," said Wimberley, who played the trumpet. "There were others who played other instruments; we would get together and play; it was always jazz."

Learning that Wimberley had an interest in art, German soldiers who were artists themselves "made portraits of us," Wimberley said. "We gave them cigarettes; they’d rather have that than money. We didn’t like the Germans because of Hitler, but some of them became my very good friends," he said.

After 18 months in the service, Wimberley was discharged. "I was so glad to get back home," he said. "I wanted to come home and see my mother in the kitchen."

His latent bent toward art spurred Wimberley to pursue studies in painting, sculpture and pottery at Howard University. From a family of musicians and artists, "I’ve always been some kind of an artist, but I got better," said Wimberley, who is represented by the prestigious Berry Campbell Gallery in Manhattan. Christine Berry, a co-owner of the gallery with Martha Campbell, said his abstract paintings are highly sought-after around the nation.

Some of Wimberley’s works are included in "Color and Absence," a show at the Southampton Arts Center through Dec. 27. He is usually busy, dividing his time between his home in Sag Harbor, his studio in Corona, Queens, and Berry Campbell. Wimberley is married. He and his wife, Juanita, have a son, Walden, a musician.

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News: The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Presents: Virtual Gallery Talk, Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed, October 29, 2020

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Presents: Virtual Gallery Talk, Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed

October 29, 2020

Virtual Gallery Talk, Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed
November 9, 2020 1:00PM
This is a Virtual Program. ZOOM information will be included in your confirmation email.

Register

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News: Perle Fine | Small Abstractions: Highlights from Sheldon’s Permanent Collection | Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska, October 20, 2020

Perle Fine | Small Abstractions: Highlights from Sheldon’s Permanent Collection | Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska

October 20, 2020

Spinning Figure, 1949
Oil on canvas
42 3/4 × 13 7/8 inches
Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Anna R. and Frank M. Hall Charitable Trust

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News: SRQ Magazine | Pandemic Portraits: Mike Solomon captures the faces of turbulent times with his latest exhibition., October 17, 2020 - Phil Lederer for SRQ Magazine

SRQ Magazine | Pandemic Portraits: Mike Solomon captures the faces of turbulent times with his latest exhibition.

October 17, 2020 - Phil Lederer for SRQ Magazine

"I just hope people see what's there," says Mike Solomon of the portraits comprising his latest exhibition, Scenes from the Pandemic, showing online this November through the Sarasota Art Museum. Drawn in colored pencil, the series captures, in part, the long terrible arc of that period in 2020, beginning as a tribute to black doctors and essential workers but ultimately spiraling into an emotional account of protesters and journalists under assault in a world caught on fire and an artist coming to terms with what he sees. Though isolated from his studio while caring for his mother during the pandemic, he couldn’t ignore the images on TV, the photographs arriving daily on the doorstep or his artist’s instinct gnawing at his inactivity.

“A dissatisfaction with being more remote than I wanted to be in terms of activism,” Solomon says. “I didn’t want to be outside of it looking in.” And in those photographs, he found himself struck by a particular aspect of the social unrest unfolding before him. “There are black doctors helping anyone who walks through the door,” he says. “Yet they take their scrubs off and walk outside and they might get shot. Can you imagine that?” So the renowned abstract artist picked up a colored pencil and tried something he hadn’t done in near 50 years: draw from a photograph. And as he did, he embarked on both an artistic and emotional journey.

Solomon admits to a certain “philosophical prejudice” against drawing from photo references, saying that he never quite understood why an artist would spend their time on such a pursuit when the photograph already exists. “Now I do,” he says. Not only did Solomon find the exercise an artistic challenge, more engaging and difficult than he had previously supposed, but he also found that, in forcing himself to absorb each image in minute detail and re-create it from his own hand, it awakened greater compassion for his subjects.

“I go down into this little world and the empathy emerges,” he says. “It’s a way of digesting it in an empathetic way you wouldn’t normally.” It’s an empathy that Solomon hopes his audience can partake in, if they just take a moment to stop and really see what has happened on their and his collective watch. And if the images in the papers didn’t get the point across, maybe seeing them in a different context will. “As soon as it becomes a ‘work of art,’ people stop a lot longer,” Solomon says. “That’s just the magic of art—it slows the moment down.” SRQ

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News: A Gallery Resurgence in Chelsea, October  9, 2020 - Roberta Smith for The New York Times

A Gallery Resurgence in Chelsea

October 9, 2020 - Roberta Smith for The New York Times

ART REVIEW

A Gallery Resurgence in Chelsea

In the face of economic unknowns, the message from the city’s galleries is: we’re not taking this lying down. Roberta Smith on 16 of the neighborhood’s most riveting painting shows.

By  

After several months of forced inactivity because of the pandemic, New York’s art galleries are back, with a vengeance. Since Labor Day, they have collectively mustered one of the better fall seasons of the last several years, with more to come in the weeks ahead. Yes, there have been changes. Unfortunately, some galleries have closed, while others are being worryingly slow to reopen. Yet fewer have gone missing than seemed likely in March or April. Others have sought new leases on life by relocating from Chelsea to TriBeCa, or from SoHo to the Upper East Side, and so forth.

In the face of the economic unknowns, the collective message from galleries sounds something like: we’re not taking this lying down.

The sense of resurgence is especially tangible in Chelsea, where my running list of shows to see has reached 74. A good number form a fractious conversation about painting.

The differing viewpoints about the medium can be dizzying, ricocheting off each other. They range from Pieter Schoolwerth’s demonically choreographed “Shifted Sims” series at Petzel Gallery — where figures and interiors from the Sims video games, printed on canvas, intersect with mannered applications of paint, forming a disturbing netherworld of social and art-making rituals — to Julian Schnabel’s latest forays into Romantic abstraction at Pace. In them, great flourishes of white and blue unfurl across slightly shaped stretchers with a dusty pink tarp serving as canvas. And they are bookended by shows of crisp new Minimalist paintings from Robert Mangold, and Yoshitomo Nara’s unendingly cute, wide-eyed innocents, brought forth with consummate ease in paint and colored pencil.

Mr. Schoolwerth’s fastidious craft finds some echo in Kyle Dunn’s work at P.P.O.W., where the paintings build on the homoerotic realism of Paul Cadmus and the stylized figuration of Tamara de Lempicka — once-overlooked talents of the 1930s. His beautifully carved wood frames ripple around and sometimes interrupt the images.

At Berry Campbell you can see the all-but-forgotten fusion of Minimalist boldness and Color Field staining that Edward Avesidian achieved in the mid-1960s. And Michael Rosenfeld Gallery has brought together a large, stunning group of Benny Andrews’s portraits primarily from the 1970s and ’80s which have not been seen together before. The psychological realness of Mr. Andrews’s Black subjects contrasts strikingly with the more polemical go-for-the jugular approach of a younger generation exemplified by the strong new paintings in Titus Kaphar’s first show at Gagosian, two blocks away.

 
 
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News: Delicious Line: Edward Avedisian: Reverberations, October  3, 2020 - Franklin Einspruch for Delicious Line

Delicious Line: Edward Avedisian: Reverberations

October 3, 2020 - Franklin Einspruch for Delicious Line

Edward Avedisian: Reverberations
Berry Campbell
Reviewed by Franklin Einspruch

Too sloppy to be hard-edge but too crisp to be painterly - could we call them medium-edge? - the 1965 paintings of Edward Avedisian infuse Pop irreverence into a mode of painting that Darby Bannard called presentational abstraction, as if the art object "was staring right back at you like it was another person."

The compositional motif throughout the series is a striped ball or two sailing through the eighty-inch-plus color field. I was once an avid juggler and I am all but helpless with glee in front of these paintings. Nevertheless a few examples stand out. The orange and blue ball on the green background (all are untitled) hits an especially good color balance, with both the orange and the green reading as light. The orange and yellow ball on the burgundy background gets great mileage out of the staining effect of the acrylic. The "medium" of "medium-edge" would work as a double entendre, as the spill of paint past the drawn lines creates transparencies of color that turn these simple arrangements into pictures. Are they staring back, or am I?

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News: New York Times Magazine On Long Island, a Beachfront Haven for Black Families, October  1, 2020 - Sandra E. Garcia for The New York Times Magazine

New York Times Magazine On Long Island, a Beachfront Haven for Black Families

October 1, 2020 - Sandra E. Garcia for The New York Times Magazine

In the 1930s, a group of trailblazing African-Americans bought plots for themselves in Sag Harbor, establishing a close-knit community that’s spanned multiple generations.

By: Sandra E. Garcia

WHILE VACATIONING ONE summer in the late 1930s, Maude Terry decided to go fishing. On her way to Gardiners Bay in eastern Long Island, she came across a secluded, underdeveloped, marshy, wooded area that faced a beach. Immediately, she felt a sense of tranquillity in the sylvan space, surrounded by tall old oak and walnut trees. Green shrubbery and weeds grew amid the sand at her feet, and her skin turned sticky in the salt air. It was heaven.

At the time, Terry was a Brooklyn schoolteacher who spent most summers with her husband, Frederick Richards, and her daughter, Iris, who were both doctors at Harlem Hospital; her sister Amaza Lee Meredith, the chair of the art department of Virginia State University in Ettrick, Va. (who was also one of the first Black female architects in the United States), would occasionally join them. The sisters had grown up in Lynchburg, Va., and lived most of their lives up and down the East Coast: Come summer, Terry would usually rent a cottage in Eastville, an area on the outskirts of Sag Harbor, the beachfront village that — although it straddles the rich, mostly white enclaves of Southampton and East Hampton — has always remained a bit more subdued, at least compared to Long Island’s other storied warm-weather escapes, which begin at the eastern edge of Queens and stretch more than 100 miles out into the Atlantic Ocean.

Read Full Article

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News: Berry Campbell Presents: Continuum, a Special Exhibition at Ashawagh Hall, Springs, East Hampton, New York, September 30, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Presents: Continuum, a Special Exhibition at Ashawagh Hall, Springs, East Hampton, New York

September 30, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Continuum
ERIC DEVER | MIKE SOLOMON | SUSAN VECSEY | FRANK WIMBERLEY
October 9 - 12, 2020

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News: , September 29, 2020

September 29, 2020

AVEDISIAN AT BERRY CAMPBELL: JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED
September 26, 2020
By: Piri Halasz

Edward Avedisian (1936-2007) wasn't in "Post-Painterly Abstraction," the landmark show organized by Clement Greenberg in 1962.  He is, however, included in "Clement Greenberg: A Critic's Collection," the catalogue of work owned by the late critic and acquired by the Portland Art Museum in 2000. And, like other, better-known color-field painters, Avedisian evidently understood the importance of making beautiful art that can offer balm to the wounded soul even –or perhaps especially -- in the most trying times.

The twelve paintings in this show date from 1963 to 1965. This was a period wracked by Vietnam, the first upheavals of the civil rights movement, and the assassination of JFK.    And so this show comes like just what the doctor ordered in this equally if not more messed-up, politically toxic and disease-ridden New York moment of 2020. 

Go and feast your eyes on "Edward Avedisian: Reverberations" at Berry Campbell (through October 10). It will let you take a trip for a few brief moments out of the here and now..and will therefore allow you to return, refreshed & reinvigorated, to do whatever you think may need to be done with redoubled zeal.

I confess that Avedisian's name wasn't familiar to me when I walked into this show.  With the aid of the gallery's literature (as well as a bit of help from the web) I can report that he was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, and studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. After having had at least one show in the Boston area, he moved to New York in the late '50s.

There he studied a bit more (at the School of Visual Arts), and became involved with the adult New York art scene.  He was part of a whole younger generation of abstract artists: near-contemporaries included Darby Bannard (1934-2016), Frank Stella (b. 1936), and Larry Poons (b. 1937). From what l can tell, it seems that Avedisian's initial abstractions were painterly, in the tradition of first-generation abstract expressionism, and only became post-painterly later on.

He had a show in 1958 at the short-lived Hansa Gallery. Though it's not clear to me what kind of work he showed, the gallery was under the direction of Richard Bellamy & Ivan Karp, two live wires on the neo-Dada, pop-art front.

The Berry Campbell literature suggests that Avedisian combined the "hot" colors of pop with the "cool, more analytical qualities of Color Field painting."  Certainly, Avedisian's colors are bright, but I don't see any further analogies with the limited and coloristically obvious palette of the likes of Warhol, Wesselman, Rosenquist or Lichtenstein. 

Rather, I find most of Avedisian's colors far more varied & sophisticated than pop-art colors—fortunately (as far as I'm concerned).

All of these paintings are about circles, and of course circles are richly allusive: they are reminiscent of everything from suns, moon and stars to faces and bouncing balls – even (to be a little anachronistic) emojis.

 These shapes are not only allusive but also wonderfully cheerful.

And there seems to be a sort of progression in this show from paintings with two, three or five little balls – decorated in various ways --- to paintings with just one. 

The balls in the paintings with one ball in them are striped, like beach balls.   The biggest canvas, a majestic horizontal in deep purple, has only a small ball floating near its lower edge – this ball is striped with a lighter purple and orange.  It is a very impressive work.

But I guess my real favorites are the ones where the balls grow big, big and bigger, until they outgrow the canvas and only a portion of them can be shown---like the moon coming over a mountain.

There are five of these paintings in all, including one right at the entrance, one in the first gallery space, one (a smaller watercolor) in the central space, and two at the very back of the gallery.

The one I have chosen to reproduce hangs on the southernmost gallery wall. Here the circle has grown so big that only a quarter of it can be shown.  The circle has navy blue and lime green vertical stripes, while the field that it dominates is a rich cinnamon brown.  And the stripes descend from the top of the painting, making the ball look impossibly large and imposing.

But what is it, really?  The moon seen through a powerful telescope?  Or the ocean seen through a periscope? The magic of abstraction is it can be all of these – or none.

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News: Surface Magazine | The Gallerist Duo Championing Unsung Postwar Artists, September 11, 2020 - Surface Magazine

Surface Magazine | The Gallerist Duo Championing Unsung Postwar Artists

September 11, 2020 - Surface Magazine

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell, the founders of Berry Campbell gallery in New York, seek to spotlight oft-overlooked artists who played pivotal roles in popular movements.

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell often finish each other’s sentences—and why wouldn’t they? The art dealers have worked together for nearly a decade, and decided to strike out on their own in 2013, founding Berry Campbell gallery in Chelsea, New York. Exhibiting postwar and contemporary work, the gallery seeks to showcase underrepresented artists who still played key roles in the popular movements. But, as Campbell notes, they don’t just stay in one lane: “We don’t have any real parameters—Christine and I have similar taste in terms of what we like.” On the occasion of the gallery’s latest show, “Edward Avedisian: Reverberations,” Surface caught up with the pair to discuss their role in the Chelsea gallery scene, the role of physical spaces in an increasingly digital world, and more. 

Tell me about the origins of Berry Campbell. What did you feel was missing in the Chelsea gallery community that you wanted to become? 

Campbell: Seven or eight years ago, Christine and I worked together at a large Midtown gallery specializing in American paintings and abstract expressionism, notably painters from from the East End of Long Island. We absolutely loved working together, and she had been in the business for about 15 years longer than I had, so I always felt she was a great mentor and confidante. When that gallery closed, I didn’t want to find a job working for “the man” at another gallery, so Christine and I talked. We discovered a gap in the Chelsea art scene: a few galleries showed artists that were well-respected back in their day, but for whatever reason—whether it was race, gender, or geography—they had fallen off the map. We felt that our role could be bringing these postwar and abstract expressionist artists back to the forefront by telling their stories and showcasing their contributions to the movement. 

What kinds of artists does the gallery represent, or seek to represent? You’ve been vocal about championing female artists. What kind of work speaks to you and adds to your roster?
Berry: Recently we’ve had some critical acclaim by featuring women artists from the 1950s who were part of the group of artists that you know, like Joan Mitchell, Helen Frankenthaler, and Elaine de Kooning, but maybe didn’t have as wild of lives or as much written about them. We’ve done exhibitions of Perle Fine, who was part of the Ninth Street Show. She’s recently been exhibited at the Guggenheim, and we’ve represented her for more than eight years, so she’s finally getting her due. Yvonne Thomas is another artist from the 1950s whom we’ve shown twice. We’re trying to get the word out there.

You’re both so steeped in gallery and museum worlds, and have deep art historical backgrounds. What makes Berry Campbell different from your past ventures?

Campbell: 
It’s a true collaboration. Taking on artists and estates is truly personal because not only are you showing the artist’s work, you’re honoring their life. You have to truly believe in the wholeness of the artist and the people you work with. We’re always open to hearing ideas and seeing bodies of work that haven’t been seen before. Christine embraces my ideas, and I embrace Christine’s ideas. All of us work together. 

Has Berry Campbell added any exciting new artists to its roster recently?Campbell: Our most recent addition was Ida Kohlmeyer. We showed her work in the spring—it was supposed to only last a month, but lasted through the pandemic. 

Berry: She’s a New Orleans artist and is really wonderful. She started out as an abstract expressionist and then shifted her style to these great kind of hieroglyphic paintings. 

It’s exciting that you’ve reopened after months of online viewing rooms. How has Covid-19 impacted your programming? Has it made you reconsider the gallery’s role? 

Berry: We have a beautiful ground space on West 24th Street in Chelsea across from Gagosian and Matthew Marks. And before the pandemic, we used to have a hundred people come in on a Saturday afternoon, and then the gallery closed. We switched to having viewing rooms on our website, but I still believe that people need to see art in person. That’s why we’ll always go to museums and art galleries—you have to see a painting to experience it or see a sculpture outside to be a part of it. While the digital market is growing, you have to see something in person to get the true feeling and sense of scale.

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News: Susan Vecsey | Nassau County Museum of Art: Artists and Scholars on “blue.” – Susan Vecsey – A Virtual Talk – September 10, September 10, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Susan Vecsey | Nassau County Museum of Art: Artists and Scholars on “blue.” – Susan Vecsey – A Virtual Talk – September 10

September 10, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Artists and Scholars on "blue." A Virtual Talk with Artist Susan Vecsey 
This is a virtual program through ZOOM
Thursday, September 10
4 pm
$10 members, $20 non-members

Now a rising star in the Hamptons art community, Susan Vecsey was a student of Graham Nickson at the New York Studio School and a visiting artist at the American Academy in Rome in 2012. With solo museum and gallery shows, she has garnered such critical raves in the arts press for her “virtuoso painting.” Grab a favorite cocktail and join us for this lively and informative session in the comfort of your home.

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News: The Brooklyn Rail | Mike Solomon: Artist Stories from the Pandemic, September  9, 2020 - Joyce Beckenstein for The Brooklyn Rail

The Brooklyn Rail | Mike Solomon: Artist Stories from the Pandemic

September 9, 2020 - Joyce Beckenstein for The Brooklyn Rail

At the same time, quarantine has compelled artists to connect with their communities in new ways. Jeremy Dennis, a tribal member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation, is known for his photographs exploring issues of Indigenous identity and cultural assimilation. With exhibits and photoshoots cancelled, he now works with his father to restore the family’s house on the Shinnecock reservation. It will serve as his home, studio and as a communal art space for an artist residency. Roz Dimon works with the Children’s Museum of the East End to bring art to kids within the Latin American community, Zooming with them, and encouraging them to express their fears and joys. But unlike these artists, Mike Solomon had to leave town in February and head to Florida to care for his 102-year-old mom. While there, he met first responders at the Multicultural Health Institute, an organization dedicated to health care for African Americans. The gripping reality of Black physicians risking their lives—first on the pandemic’s front lines, and then again, walking along the street as people of color—moved Solomon to honor them. In a departure from his abstract paintings and sculpture, he has produced a compelling series of pencil drawings, portraits of Black physicians that unfurl the disturbing personal and political imperatives underlying this coronavirus saga.

This evolving archival project hanging on a video grid invites us into artists’ studios, to glimpse their stuff amidst their artworks, to glean the curator’s response to today’s predicament for artists and museums, and to preserve an intimate anthology of artists’ stories during the pandemic.

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News: Frank Wimberley | New York Academy Of Art’s 2020 Hamptons Exhibition To Reflect Upon The Past And Look Towards The Future, July 22, 2020 - Nicole Barylski for Hamptons.com

Frank Wimberley | New York Academy Of Art’s 2020 Hamptons Exhibition To Reflect Upon The Past And Look Towards The Future

July 22, 2020 - Nicole Barylski for Hamptons.com

The New York Academy of Art is taking up a five-month residency at the Southampton Arts Center, where it will present 2020 Vision, a spectacular exhibition featuring over 60 artists and writers. Co-curated by Academy President David Kratz and Stephanie Roach of the FLAG Art Foundation, and edited by Emma Gilbey Keller, 2020 Vision will be on display from Saturday, July 25 through Sunday, December 27.

"The pain, loss and uncertainty of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The awakening cry for social justice following the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery and many others. The unnerving possibility of global recession. 2020 has already experienced seismic events that are shifting values and shaping our choices as citizens and as creators," Kratz and Roach noted. "Artists and writers are always the antennae of our society, all the more so at a time as challenging as this one.  They have an opportunity—some might say, a duty—to interpret this moment and imagine the world not only as it is, but also as it could be."

2020 Vision will encompass visual artworks from art students and rising stars to contemporary icons, as well as a myriad of texts, such as poetry and essays, and video diaries.

"This is the guiding challenge of the group exhibition, 2020 Vision.  We asked artists, writers, and creative thinkers to consider three questions of critical importance: Our lives will never be the same, but what will change look like? What do we want to keep as we rebuild? And what must we guard against?" they said.

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News: Christine Berry Appointed as Awards Committee for the New York Studio School 2020 Alumni Exhibition: Mercedes Matter Awards Announcement & Discussion, July 22, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Christine Berry Appointed as Awards Committee for the New York Studio School 2020 Alumni Exhibition: Mercedes Matter Awards Announcement & Discussion

July 22, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Christine Berry appointed as part of the Awards Committee for the New York Studio School 2020 Alumni Exhibition: Mercedes Matter Awards Announcement & Discussion

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Whitehot Magazine | Susan Vecsey at Berry Campbell

July 20, 2020 - Jonathan Goodman for Whitehot Magazine of Contemporary Art

“In Between,” the title of Susan Vecsey’s show, refers both to the strange period of quarantine we currently find ourselves living in, as well as the double nature of the painter’s work, in which she floats an acquaintance with artists such as Mark Rothko and Helen Frankenthaler and their landscape-influenced abstractions with her own experience of non-objective art in response to the natural world (Vecsey lives part of the time in East Hampton). The work is subtle, deliberately beautiful, and historically cognizant of the New York School and its history during the past half-century, in particular the ongoing perceptions of a Color Field predilection. If one felt compelled to make a choice, it can be said that the works tend to lean in the direction of landscape; their simplicity makes them strong in an abstract sense, but we never lose the implication that we are close to land, to water, and to the sky. Individually, the paintings are attractive, but there is also a cumulative effect, in which the paintings work a sympathetic magic by creating a pastel-like mood and atmosphere, in which both the beauty of nature and also of art are handled with a notable measure and restraint.

The condition of being in between needs to be remarked upon; much of good painting today plays with the idea that an imagery can share aspects of stylistic genres that play off of difference in their essence. Yet it can be noted that nothing is purely abstract nor entirely figurative. Elements or parts of the painting can flow in and out of meanings that take on both styles. It is hard to see both approaches occurring in the same moment; we remember those visual paradoxes where, looked at one way, the image represents one kind of object; and then, when the mental intelligence shifts, another image comes into being--but both images cannot be processed at the same time. Perhaps Vecsey’s general achievement is to render a visual system that jumps from a particular manner of looking into another. While this process is not new--we have the extraordinary achievement of Rothko, mentioned above--its innate complexity and willingness to occupy different ways of seeing within the same composition make it wonderfully current, not to mention extraordinarily interesting as art.

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News: Susan Vecsey, Frank Wimberley | Guild Hall, 82nd Artist Members Exhibition, June 11, 2020 - Guild Hall

Susan Vecsey, Frank Wimberley | Guild Hall, 82nd Artist Members Exhibition

June 11, 2020 - Guild Hall

 
Frank Wimberley
All About Ronnie



Susan Vecsey
Untitled (Yellow / Lavender)

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News: Sam Gilliam Featured on Widewalls Newsletter, June 11, 2020 - Widewalls

Sam Gilliam Featured on Widewalls Newsletter

June 11, 2020 - Widewalls

Sam Gilliam, Ribboned II, featured on Widewalls newsletter

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News: JILL NATHANSON | Artist-Guided Studio Tour, June 10, 2020 - Berry Campbell

JILL NATHANSON | Artist-Guided Studio Tour

June 10, 2020 - Berry Campbell

In this video, Jill Nathanson gives a tour of her studio in Hoboken, New Jersey, featuring some of her paintings in progress.

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News: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, , May 28, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art,

May 28, 2020 - Berry Campbell

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
EXTENDED: SYD SOLOMON: CONCEALED AND REVEALED AT THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART

NEW YORK, NEW YORK, MAY 28, 2020—Berry Campbell is pleased to announce the extension of the Syd Solomon traveling museum exhibition, Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed. After opening at the Deland Museum, Florida in 2016, the retrospective traveled to the Greenville County Museum, South Carolina (2017), and then to Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York (2018). The exhibition opened at its final venue, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida, in December of 2019. Shortly after a full-day symposium on Syd Solomon in February 2020, the museum temporarily closed due to COVID-19. The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art reopened to the public on May 27, 2020 and will extend Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed and all associated programing through January 2021.

Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed consists of 45 paintings and works on paper sourced from public and private collections, including hundreds of original and never seen before archival photographs and documents from the Solomon Archive. These newly discovered materials detail how Syd Solomon's World War II camouflage designs and other early graphic arts skills were foundational to his unique approach to Abstract Expressionism. This new information makes this exhibition and accompanying catalogue a revelation by furthering the understanding of Syd Solomon’s life and work.

Syd Solomon served as camouflage expert in the United States Army during World War II (1941- 1945), which prevented him from taking part in the formative years of the Abstract Expressionist movement in New York. His camouflage designs were used during the Normandy invasion and in the African campaign and his camouflage instruction manuals where distributed throughout the US Army. Solomon's designs were shared with the English camouflage experts, many of whom were artists, including Barbara Hepworth, Roland Penrose, and Henry Moore. Syd Solomon was awarded five Bronze Stars for his service.

Solomon suffered frostbite in the Battle of the Bulge and was not able to live in cold climates, thus settling in Sarasota, Florida. Although he arrived to the Abstract Expressionist scene late because of the War, by 1959 his work had gained the admiration of Museum of Modern Art curators, Peter Selz and Dorothy C. Miller, the Whitney Museum of American Art's director, John Baur, and many others, including artists Philip Guston and James Brooks, who became life-long friends. At this time, Syd Solomon's paintings entered the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and over 100 additional museum collections.

This exhibition was co-curated by Mike Solomon, the artist’s son, and Ola Wlusek, the Keith D. and Linda L. Monda Curator of Modern Art and Contemporary Art, at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, Florida.

Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed is accompanied by a 96-page hardcover catalogue with essays by Michael Auping (former Chief Curator at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and curator of recent exhibitions of Frank Stella and Mark Bradford), Dr. Gail Levin (expert on Lee Krasner and Edward Hopper), George Bolge (Director of the Deland Museum of Art, Florida), and Mike Solomon, (artist and the artist’s son). This exhibition was organized by the Estate of Syd Solomon in conjunction with Berry Campbell, New York.

For museum hours of operation, please visit: www.Ringling.org. To visit the exhibition virtually, please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0f1b8wRQhsw. To purchase the exhibition catalogue, please email: info@berrycampbell.com.

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News: Woman's Art Journal | Yvonne Thomas: The Singleness of the Poetry, May 23, 2020 - Vittorio Colaizzi for Woman's Art Journal

Woman's Art Journal | Yvonne Thomas: The Singleness of the Poetry

May 23, 2020 - Vittorio Colaizzi for Woman's Art Journal

Writing in 1981 of paintings made between 1955 and 1962, critic Theodore F. Wolff claimed that the work of Abstract Expressionist painter Yvonne Thomas (1913–2009) “reminds us that good painting is good painting regardless of the form it takes.”Wolff’s assertion must make the sober and disinterested scholar a little queasy, but it is typical, if somewhat strident, of criticism of Thomas’s work, in that it combines an appeal to quality with an acknowledgement of historical contingency. In this way it demonstrates the problem that Thomas’s work poses for educated viewers. Criticism of the last half century has tended to homogenize and dismiss gestural abstraction as an embodiment of inadvisably idealistic values, and as a foil to or baseline for the performative, sculptural, or photographic work that repudiated or grew from this kind of painting—consider for example the work of Carolee Schneemann (1939–2019). While painting itself currently enjoys wide and varied manifestations, and claims about Thomas’s sheer quality proliferate, a certain familiar aspect to her abstraction, as is evident in Summer Fantasy (1954; Pl. 1), was noticed in published criticism as early as 1956. This did not prevent Dore Ashton from attributing to her “genuinely fresh insights,” nor Donald Judd from excepting her from his nearuniversal condemnation of gestural abstraction with a positive review in 1960. 2

Born Yvonne Navello in Nice, France, in 1913, she moved to Boston with her family in 1926. She showed an interest and aptitude for art from an early age, and following studies at the Cooper Union began a career in commercial art in the 1930s. She married Leonard Thomas in 1938 (they lived in Newport, Rhode Island, during the war), and maintained close ties with the New York art world throughout her life (Fig. 1). She attended the Art Students League in 1940, and studied with Vaclav Vytacil. She also had private lessons with Dimitri Romanovsky (a Russian artist specializing in nudes and portraiture), and attended the Ozenfant School of Art. Nearly every published account of Thomas’s work mentions her participation in the innovative and short-lived painting workshop entitled “The Subjects of the Artists,” which ran from 1948 to 1949 and was initiated but abandoned by Clyfford Still and taken up by Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell, William Baziotes, and David Hare. Barnett Newman joined in the second year. These sessions were an avenue for the five burgeoning Abstract Expressionists to share with an equal number of interested students, Thomas among them, their incipient methods of free painting, bidden by one’s  inclinations in the face of the materials and presumably conditioned by the subconscious mind. Ten years later and throughout her life, this sense of freedom remained in her paintings and works on paper, as a small but expansive gouache shows (Fig. 2; 1959).The aim, as Robert Hobbs and Barbara Cavaliere have shown in their landmark 1977 article, “Against a Newer Laocoon,” was to allow a less literary, less illustrative surrealism to take root. 3

In 1950 she enrolled in one of Hans Hofmann’s summer classes, and in the next decade was included in group exhibitions of artists identified with Abstract Expressionism, including those at New York’s Stable Gallery, from 1953 to 1957. The—only relative—belatedness with which Thomas came to Abstract Expressionism, the stylistic variety she pursued, and the nuanced and revealing critical account that exists, together resonate with contemporary concerns about painting’s viability that are rooted in midcentury abstraction and its reception. Continue Reading

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News: Tussle Magazine: Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered  at Berry Campbell, New York, May 20, 2020 - Jonathan Goodman for Tussle Magazine

Tussle Magazine: Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered at Berry Campbell, New York

May 20, 2020 - Jonathan Goodman for Tussle Magazine

This exhibition titled "Cloistered" by Ida Kohlmeyer at the Berry Campbell Gallery consists of paintings and sculptures from the late 1960s, before she turned to the hieratic abstractions of her later career. In some ways the paintings on show relate to abstract elements found in the art of Georgia O’Keeffe and Hilma af Klint (the early 20th century Swedish abstractionist); they consist of mostly diamond-shaped patterns, with a couple of circular compositions. Kohlmeyer was educated and taught at Tulane University in New Orleans; she studied in Provincetown in the middle Fifties with the German-born teacher and abstract painter Hans Hofmann. In the paintings available to us, we see distinguished, soft-edged nonobjective imagery, in which geometric forms become vehicles for understated emotion. The colors are softly muted, communicating the artist’s ability to transmit feeling through simple designs and quite hues.

While not exactly a serial art, this kind of abstraction builds its effects through repetition of forms from one painting to the next. The diamond-shaped designs hold our interest by building a narrowing focus into the very center of the paintings, which can contain different shapes often circles, but also crosses and slits. They offer a kind of artist’s vernacular; the shapes repeat themselves and create links joining one painting to another. As a result, the body of work joins individual voices to a communal process that asks Kohlmeyer’s audience to appreciate their cumulative effect. Thus, a particularly successful variation within unity occurs, full in keeping with a lot of painting being done at the time these works were made. The larger question, Does such repetitiveness add or detract from the experience of the work? This can be considered as something more theoretical--in the case of Kohlmeyer, the accomplishments brought about by such an approach are genuine, in part because the differences from one painting to the next which are large enough to enable us to see the works as individual efforts rather than as nearly identical compositions.

In “Cloistered” (1969), Kohlmeyer has painted a thin, mostly brown diamond with a thinner dark purple stripe re-enforcing the overall shape, inside of which is another diamond, outlined in white and surrounded by a haze of the same dark-purple color. Inside the confines of the white diamond is a thin, yellow-brown, vertically aligned lozenge, flanked on either side by purple and then dark-brown stripes--the same colors used to define the outer diamond. The title might well refer to the oval deep in the center of the painting; it might even convey something of the spiritual mood that exists in the work. Whatever the motivation for the painting is, the experience of Kohlmeyer’s effort is fully satisfying. It suggests, in abstract fashion, a place of refuge and solace. An untitled work, circa 1969, consists of a five-pointed star shape, within which is a white diamond with a circle in the middle. Outside this puzzle of shapes are found a pentangle of red paint, along with a pink area, following the form of the pentangle in a rough manner, linearly contained by a dark-brown line. Certainly, the star is abstract enough, but the image conveys a primal feeling not unaligned with the spirit.

Kohlmeyer’s shapes can hardly be seen as devotional, yet they are so basic as to be archetypal reworking of forms that may have had spiritual meaning in other, earlier cultures. In “Black Insert” (1968), we see a black diamond shape, in the middle of which is the vertical lozenge; this amalgam of forms is supported by quadrants of off white, defined by green stripes of middling width that outline the diamond. The green lines create a cross behind the diamond that does not in any way evoke a Christian aura. 

The possibility of external reference, beyond the abstract form, cannot be entirely dismissed. It would be a major mistake to see the works of art as intimating an atmosphere of piety. It is just that the forms in these completely abstract paintings are so archaic as to raise questions about their origins beyond the intentions of the artist. This happens inevitably. In “Suspended” (1968), we meet more rounded forms: a curving hourglass shape dominates the painting, with rows of undulating, differently colored lines embellishing the upper and lower register of the form. Outside this hourglass is a background of whitish, slate blue curved like a circle. Beyond that, there exists a green diamond, with four pinkish mauve triangles, one in each of the cardinal directions. Finally, a smudged light-yellow band follows the edge of the green diamond.

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News: The Brooklyn Rail: Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered, May 18, 2020 - William Corwin for The Brooklyn Rail

The Brooklyn Rail: Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered

May 18, 2020 - William Corwin for The Brooklyn Rail

Think of all the meanings, nuances, and implications embedded in the word “cloistered,” and they reside here in Ida Kohlmeyer’s series of that title, executed in the late 1960s and now on virtual view at Berry Campbell Gallery through May 23. The earliest of these works were produced in 1968, the same year Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey came out, and many of them have the wary and watchful quality of the monotonic computer HAL, which loses faith in its human chaperones in Stanley Kubrick’s iconic film.

In Kohlmeyer’s paintings, there is a protected conceptual space lying just below the surface of the canvas, under a layer of sparingly applied oil paint and graphite. This is the imaginary volumetric structure for most of Kohlmeyer’s imagery in this series: a somber interior zone peeks out through a central oculus, or blossoms in an undulating vegetal sprout. The relationship of painting to the viewer is reversed as the spectator is surveilled by an alien eye. Kohlmeyer paints this cloistered presence into her works with varying degrees of directness. Black Insert” (1968) simply presents a black diamond with a lightly incised rectilinear form floating, shadowy, within it. By contrast, the final painting in the show, Cloistered (1969), stares out obsessively from the back of the gallery. A cross is carefully etched on the lozenge of the eye, a detail that makes the viewer feel as if the painting broodingly judges them. Kohlmeyer's reclusive entities carry with them all the accompanying angst, sadness, concealment, and, at times, anger, that arise from an unwilling sequestration.

There’s also a more immediate structural interpretation: most of the works are geometric, but with relaxed hand-drawn lines, and play on the symmetry and proportion of medieval walled gardens—the literal cloister. The picture plane is quartered or in some cases halved, and has a central element that serves as a point of arrival for the vectors of the painting and attracts the eye of the viewer. In this central position, Kohlmeyer typically substitutes something dark and glowering for the babbling fountains and cheerful plantings most of us know from the Cloisters museum in Fort Tryon Park. Of the paintings on view, the most Kubrickian watcher of all is the bisected black cornea and dilated pupil of Cloister #5 (1968). But there are exceptions, and Kohlmeyer does occasionally traffic in less emotionally fraught effects. Cloistered #12 (c. 1969) culminates in a colorful black/blue and pink/yellow floret, while Suspended (1968), with its palette of bright grass greens, iris, and greenish yellow, is very upbeat, and seemingly Easter-themed, including a central egg-shaped form decorated with arcs and bands. Kohlmeyer’s sculptures are variations on the theme of the paintings, but play with the idea of multiplicity. Canvas stretched over wood, they are paintings moved off the wall and placed in space, toying with a front and back in three dimensions. Stacked #1 (1969), is a tower of three cubes, with fecund buds centered on each surface: the painting now overlooks the entire room like a cyborg lighthouse.

There are obvious relationships that can be drawn between Kohlmeyer’s paintings and human anatomy—eyes and other organs are most obvious. But the repetitive crosses and ecclesiastically-specific architectural titles reiterate a spiritual and symbolic subtext that moves beyond mere floral or organic models. It is hard to say what the message is—the works themselves, juxtaposing bright colors with a forlorn presence, may not have decided for themselves. Before she created the works on view at Berry Campbell, Kohlmeyer’s style was Abstract Expressionist, influenced by Rothko and Gorky. The artist also studied under Hans Hofmann in Provincetown in the mid-fifties. Her later work would go on to explore ideas of pattern and multiplicity—Berry Campbell offers a striking example of this period in Color Stripes (1980). The Cloister series and its auxiliary works seem to represent an interlude of sorts, during which the artist explored a closer, but riskier, engagement with the viewer. These paintings have a pathos to them, but never veer into the outright horror or fury of Lee Bontecou’s dark blank lacunae from the late 1950s and early 1960s. As with all series carried out over just a few years, it’s impossible to tell if Kohlmeyer could have continued to walk the fine line between gripping emotional connectedness and over-the-top sentimentality, but for this short span, she certainly pulled it off.

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News: VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: Berry Campbell Gallery Talks: Christine Berry on Syd Solomon, Abstract Expressionist, May 14, 2020 - Berry Campbell

VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: Berry Campbell Gallery Talks: Christine Berry on Syd Solomon, Abstract Expressionist

May 14, 2020 - Berry Campbell

In this video, Christine Berry speaks on Abstract Expressionist, Syd Solomon.

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News: Eric Dever | The New York Times: A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries, May 11, 2020 - Stacey Stowe for The New York Times

Eric Dever | The New York Times: A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries

May 11, 2020 - Stacey Stowe for The New York Times

The outdoor exhibition on Long Island featured works installed at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, with social isolation as just one theme.

No one was supposed to get too close to each other over the weekend during a drive-by exhibition of works by 52 artists on the South Fork of Long Island — a dose of culture amid the sterile isolation imposed by the pandemic. But some people couldn’t help themselves...

There was spontaneous interaction. The artist Bastienne Schmidt, dressed in a bright blue pea coat and red pants, waved to those who checked out her installation of canvas-wrapped posts set six feet apart at the Bridgehampton home she shares with her husband, the photographer Philippe Cheng. Kathryn McGraw Berry, an architect sampling the tour in a champagne-colored Audi, chatted with Eric Dever, who was checking the wind resistance of his 12 paintings mounted on posts at his 18th-century Water Mill home.

 

“It’s nice seeing one’s work in the landscape when you’ve been cooped up in the house,” Mr. Dever said. “I grew up in Southern California so I appreciate the drive-through idea.”

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News: Stephen Pace Featured by Robert Passal Interior Design for #meansformakers, May  8, 2020 - Robert Passal Interior Design

Stephen Pace Featured by Robert Passal Interior Design for #meansformakers

May 8, 2020 - Robert Passal Interior Design

"#meansformakers Please join us for raising COVID19 relief funds for @cerfplus by sharing a favorite artist or artisan that inspires you. @arteriorshome will donate funds for each of our posts to @cerfplus who will in turn support the skilled artists of the artisans society. Just post your favorite maker’s work and tag @arteriors home and #meansformakers I am sharing several projects showcasing custom pieces done by some of the incredible artisans we continually work with. The work of each of these artisans truly makes each of our projects shine."

View Post on Instagram

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News: Artist's Choice: Interconnected Launches Digitally, May  7, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Artist's Choice: Interconnected Launches Digitally

May 7, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Artist's Choice: Interconnected
May 7 - June 7, 2020
View Exhibition

Berry Campbell is pleased to announce Artist’s Choice: Interconnected, an exclusive online exhibition of works from gallery’s inventory chosen by Berry Campbell’s represented contemporary artists. Eric Dever, Judith Godwin, Ken Greenleaf, Jill Nathanson, Ann Purcell, Mike Solomon, Susan Vecsey, James Walsh, Joyce Weinstein, and Frank Wimberley have thoughtfully selected one work from our gallery inventory that they associate with their own creative process and artistic journey. This artist-curated exhibition is an inquiry into the lines of influence and connections within our Berry Campbell artist community. Artist’s Choice: Interconnected launches digitally May 7, 2020.

The choices are sometimes expected, and at other times, surprising.  Some artists were inspired by a painting from an artist they had never met, and others paid tribute to old friends or mentors.  Judith Godwin recalls good times with her old friend and art dealer, Betty Parsons.  James Walsh remembers a painting by Walter Darby Bannard from a 1981 show at Knoedler Gallery.  Mike Solomon pays homage to the perseverance of abstract painter and dear friend, Frank Wimberley saying: “The quiet intermingling of his experience, with the purity of painting, gives his abstractions an authenticity and delicacy that is profound to witness.”  Ken Greenleaf favorite is Cloistered #5 (1968) by Ida Kohlmeyer, delighting in the pure abstraction.  Jill Nathanson picked a color-field forerunner, Dan Christensen.  Ann Purcell admitted to being picky but found true inspiration after visiting our Yvonne Thomas show repeatedly.  Eric Dever ruminates about Charlotte Park: “Like a favorite poem, novel or even film, a painting can be a touchstone, something one returns to with certain regularity; perhaps a gauge of some kind, beginning with personal happiness on the occasion of discovery and new revelation as our lives unfold.”  Joyce Weinstein finds parallels with John Opper.  Susan Vecsey loves the “stillness and movement” of Elaine de Kooning’s Six Horses, Blue Wall (1987).  No coincidence that Vecsey lives down the road from the Elaine de Kooning house in the Hamptons. Frank Wimberley recalls of Herman Cherry: “He was one of the East End artists who wished to me to succeed.”

ABOUT BERRY CAMPBELL
Christine Berry and Martha Campbell have many parallels in their backgrounds and interests. Both studied art history in college, began their careers in the museum world, and later worked together at a major gallery in midtown Manhattan. Most importantly, however, Berry and Campbell share a curatorial vision.

Both art dealers developed a strong emphasis on research and networking with artists and scholars during their art world years. They decided to work together, opening Berry Campbell Gallery in 2013 in the heart of New York's Chelsea art district, at 530 West 24th Street on the ground floor. In 2015, the gallery expanded, doubling its size with an additional 2,000 square feet of exhibition space.

Highlighting a selection of postwar and contemporary artists, the gallery fulfills an important gap in the art world, revealing a depth within American modernism that is just beginning to be understood, encompassing the many artists who were left behind due to race, gender, or geography-beyond such legendary figures as Pollock and de Kooning. Since its inception, the gallery has been especially instrumental in giving women artists long overdue consideration, an effort that museums have only just begun to take up, such as in the 2016 traveling exhibition, Women of Abstract Expressionism, curated by University of Denver professor Gwen F. Chanzit. This show featured work by Perle Fine and Judith Godwin, both represented by Berry Campbell, along with that of Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and Joan Mitchell. In 2019, Berry Campbell's exhibition, Yvonne Thomas: Windows and Variations (Paintings 1963 - 1965) was reviewed by Roberta Smith for the New York Times, in which Smith wrote that Thomas, "... kept her hand in, adding a fresh directness of touch, and the results give her a place in the still-emerging saga of postwar American abstraction.”

In addition to Perle Fine and Judith Godwin, artists whose work is represented by the gallery include Edward Avedisian, Walter Darby Bannard, Stanley Boxer, Dan Christensen, Eric Dever, John Goodyear, Ken Greenleaf, Raymond Hendler, Ida Kohlmeyer, Jill Nathanson, John Opper, Stephen Pace, Charlotte Park, William Perehudoff, Ann Purcell, Mike Solomon, Syd Solomon, Albert Stadler, Yvonne Thomas, Susan Vecsey, James Walsh, Joyce Weinstein, Frank Wimberley, Larry Zox, and Edward Zutrau. The gallery has helped promote many of these artists' careers in museum shows including that of Bannard at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami (2018-19); Syd Solomon, in a traveling museum show which culminates at the John and Mable Ringling Museum in Sarasota and has been extended through 2021; Stephen Pace at The McCutchan Art Center/Pace Galleries at the University of Southern Indiana (2018) and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (2019); and Vecsey and Mike Solomon at the Greenville County Museum of Art, South Carolina (2017 and 2019, respectively); and Eric Dever at the Suffolk Community College, Riverhead, New York (2020). In an April 3, 2020 New York Times review of Berry Campbell's exhibition of Ida Kohlmeyer's Cloistered paintings, Roberta Smith stated: “These paintings stunningly sum up a moment when Minimalism was giving way to or being complicated by something more emotionally challenging and implicitly feminine and feminist. They could hang in any museum.”

Collaboration is an important aspect of the gallery. With the widened inquiries and understandings that have resulted from their ongoing discussions about the art world canon, the dealers feel a continual sense of excitement in the discoveries of artists and research still to be made.

Berry Campbell is located in the heart of the Chelsea Arts District at 530 West 24th Street, Ground Floor, New York, NY 10011.  For further information, contact us at 212.924.2178, info@berrycampbell.com or www.berrycampbell.com.

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News: Eric Dever and Susan Vecsey included in Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing, May  4, 2020 - Drive-By-Art

Eric Dever and Susan Vecsey included in Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing

May 4, 2020 - Drive-By-Art

Organized by Warren Neidich

DATES: May 9th and 10th, 2020 (Rain dates May 16th and 17th)
TIMES: 12 noon until 5 pm
LOCATION: South Fork, Long Island including East Hampton, Bridgehampton, Wainscott, Sagaponack, Sag Harbor, North Haven and South Hampton
CONTACT: info@drive-by-art.org

Drive-by baby showers and birthdays have become the norm for celebrating special events during this time of social distancing and the COVID-19 pandemic. Like many others, artists and cultural producers are sequestered in their homes and studios dealing with depressed income, isolation and the fears that precarious futures produce. Enter Drive-By-Art, an outdoor public art exhibition that is experienced from the safety and intimacy of one’s own automobile.  

Not only does Drive-By-Art create a sense of needed solidarity within the artistic and cultural communities now entrenched in the South Fork of Long Island, but it also offers an experience that is otherwise severely limited by our current social distancing practices: interacting with tangible objects in the real world. 

Here is how it works!

Taking advantage of the rich, artistic heritage of the South Fork of Long Island, artists currently living and working there will install and display artworks related to this moment of social distancing on their properties, near roads or on highways. For instance, classic and experimental sculptures made inside may be installed in driveways or as lawn objects, tree trunks can be sites of interventions as paintings, rooftops as sites for light sculptures seen from the road but also the sky. Sides of houses might become surfaces for video projections and picture windows as stages for shadow puppet performances while musicians and sound poets might give live performances at the edge of properties. 

Around 50 painters, sculptors, photographers, performance artists, film and video makers, poets, and musicians of varying age, cultural background and gender are involved. All artists, their addresses, and maps of hamlets where their works can be viewed are available here: www.drive-by-art.org

We will also be conducting real time interviews with some of the artists on Instagram and Facebook. Specifics will be posted to our website. 

Special thanks to Guild Hall and Parrish Art Museum for their support.

For more information or to request a zoom interview with one of our artists, please email info@drive-by-art.org
or reach out to Warren Neidich at +1-917-664-4526 or Jocelyn Anker at +1-917-291-4406

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News: Guild Hall Museum: The MONSTER LIST of FREE Arts & Cultural Resources, May  1, 2020 - Guild Hall

Guild Hall Museum: The MONSTER LIST of FREE Arts & Cultural Resources

May 1, 2020 - Guild Hall

During this time of quarantine, we have witnessed an unprecedented amount of creative output online, ranging from internationally acclaimed artists performing on stage, to cozy living room concerts. As Guild Hall continues to release our own new and historic virtual programming, we want to make it easier for you to find arts and cultural resources from the artists and places we love in a single aggregate list. 

Below you will find creative resources for artists, families, children and adults. Please note: This is a living document, growing daily. Check back often, and feel free to suggest additions by emailing info@guildhall.org with the Subject: Monster List.

VIRTUAL ACCESS TO ARTS & CULTURE INSTITUTIONS

Berry Campbell | Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered

 

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News: 10 of Our Favorite Exhibitions From Around the World That You Can Visit Virtually, May  1, 2020 - artnet Gallery Network

10 of Our Favorite Exhibitions From Around the World That You Can Visit Virtually

May 1, 2020 - artnet Gallery Network

Gallery hop from Sydney to Miami at any time of day with these shows.

Cloistered” at Berry Campbell, New York

Ida Kohlmeyer, Cloistered #5 (1968). Courtesy of Berry Campbell Gallery.

Ida Kohlmeyer, Cloistered #5 (1968). Courtesy of Berry Campbell Gallery.

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News: International Sculpture Day: Philip Pavia, April 27, 2020 - Berry Campbell

International Sculpture Day: Philip Pavia

April 27, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Philip Pavia (1911-2005), the pioneering first-generation son of an Italian stone carver, "turned rocks into art." The Times of London called Pavia "arguably more of an original than some of his better-known contemporaries." He was rare among his peers for sculpting abstract and figurative art, and he took full advantage of a lengthy 74-year career to develop his reach. Although he started his career as a draftsman and watercolorist, Pavia ultimately made his mark with a body of work that spanned all-abstract bronzes, black-and-white abstractions in Carrara marble and, just prior to his death in 2005, at aged 94, a dozen monumental terracotta heads.

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News: VIDEO: Christine Berry on Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered, April 24, 2020 - Berry campbell

VIDEO: Christine Berry on Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered

April 24, 2020 - Berry campbell

In this video, Christine Berry speaks about Ida Kohlmeyer and Berry Campbell's current exhibition, Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered.

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Can a Virtual Art Fair Deliver? We Went in Search of Great Art in the Dallas Art Fair’s Online Viewing Rooms to Find Out

April 20, 2020 - Andrew Goldstein for Artnet News

Here are eight of the most memorable works from the Dallas Art Fair's virtual edition.

Chelsea dealers Christine Berry and Martha Campbell did not spend quite so much time on the quiddities of the online format, instead relying on old-fashioned connoisseurship, curation, and an eye for sourcing work that looks better over time to put together an excellent display anchored by female artists from the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s. Some, like Mary Abbott, Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, and Ninth Street Women star Grace Hartigan were undervalued during their lifetime. Others, like Charlotte Park, Sally Michel Avery, and Elaine de Kooning were overshadowed by their artist husbands. One, Betty Parsons, was overshadowed by herself—with her painting career long seen as secondary to her illustrious run as one of New York’s top dealers of Abstract Expressionist art.

This witty painting of a solitary red moth against a brushy blue background plays against the pieties of AbEx orthodoxy, being at once an abstract all-over composition that emphasizes the picture plane and a not-very-abstract-at-all (though Fauvist) portrait of a bug on a wall.

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News: Dallas Art Fair from the Sofa, April 17, 2020 - FAD Magazine

Dallas Art Fair from the Sofa

April 17, 2020 - FAD Magazine

Betty ParsonsThe Moth, 1969, at Berry Campbell, New York – price on application

Although known primarily as a gallerist who championed Abstract Expressionism, Betty Parsons (1900-1982) has recently been gaining increased recognition for her own art, including a solo show at Alison Jacques in London. This is certainly a radical way of tackling figure / ground issues, and one which we can now see presents an unimpeachable degree of social distancing.

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News: Editors’ Picks: 11 Things Not to Miss in the Virtual Art World This Week | Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered, April  7, 2020 - Katie White for Artnet News

Editors’ Picks: 11 Things Not to Miss in the Virtual Art World This Week | Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered

April 7, 2020 - Katie White for Artnet News

9. “Ida Kohlmeyer: Cloistered” at Berry Campbell Gallery

During her lifetime, the New Orleans painter Ida Kohlmeyer won acclaim in her native Louisiana for her abstract, often jubilantly colored canvases that hovered between gridded arrangements of Rothko-esque fields of color (in fact, she counted the AbEx giant as a friend and mentor) and the mark-making lyricism of Cy Twombly. 

A much different and little-known set of her early works can be glimpsed in “Cloistered,” a new online exhibition at Berry Campbell. Made in 1968–69, these paintings almost have the appearance of aerial maps of ancient citadels with concentric bands of geometric shapes surrounding a point of central focus. While showing the influences of Georgia O’Keeffe in places and contemporaries like Kenneth Noland in others, the works also speak to the artist’s fascination with interest in Mesoamerican art (which she voraciously collected) and in cultivating a vocabulary of hieroglyphs, emblems, and ritual meaning, which here collide into a feminine vision of Abstract Expressionism. 

—Katie White

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News: Parrish Art Museum: LIVE FROM THE STUDIO WITH ERIC DEVER, April  3, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum Events

Parrish Art Museum: LIVE FROM THE STUDIO WITH ERIC DEVER

April 3, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum Events

Tune in to a series of live streamed workshops with Parrish teaching artists Wednesdays at 11 am!
On April 15, join painter Eric Dever in his studio. Follow along and interact through a live Q&A.
Open to all!

April 15, 2020
11 am
 - 11:45 am
Register

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News: Ida Kohlmeyer Exhibition Reviewed in The New York Times by Roberta Smith, April  2, 2020 - Roberta Smith for the New York Times

Ida Kohlmeyer Exhibition Reviewed in The New York Times by Roberta Smith

April 2, 2020 - Roberta Smith for the New York Times

I learned of the artist Ida Kohlmeyer (1912-97) primarily as a teacher at Newcomb College, the women’s college at Tulane University in New Orleans, from one of her former students, the Post-Minimalist shape-shifter Lynda Benglis. In the 1970s Kohlmeyer developed a style of multihued pictographs, usually organized on a grid. Pleasantly derivative, they suggested well-behaved Joan Snyder paintings. Kohlmeyer seemed to be a journeyman artist who kept up with the latest trends; had a good color sense and a solid touch; but who never put the pedal to the metal to find out what she could do that no other artist could.
 
Then the announcement for “Cloistered,” the first Kohlmeyer exhibition at Berry Campbell, arrived by email and I stood corrected. Pedal and metal had made contact. Kohlmeyer had done something that was way above her usual average, something simple and intense. In 1968 and ’69, she produced a group of symmetrical geometric abstract paintings in a rich, winy palette. Hand drawn, their harsh shapes begin at the center of the painting’s edges, widening into diamond or chevron shapes at the center. They suggest the plans for ancient forts, and appropriately so. Cocooned at the center of this symmetry was softer symbol of vulnerability: a simple circle, or occasionally an ellipse, as in the yolk yellow one that, like the air bubble in a carpenter’s level, forms the living heart of the remarkable “Cloistered,” protected by concentric bands of deep red.

Almost never exhibited, these works may be derivative but they are gloriously so. They’re so full of the work of disparate artists that they become overarching, laying waste to the term. The gallery’s press material invites comparison with the work of Georgia O’Keeffe and Agnes Pelton. That’s fine, but more contemporary references come to mind, like Jasper Johns’s and Kenneth Noland’s targets, Billy Al Bengston’s centered irises and sundry Frank Stella paintings. Then Kohlmeyer’s efforts turn away from the men to evoke the early work of Eva Hesse and Agnes Martin, Judy Chicago’s built-up dinner plates, the dark reliefs of Lee Bontecou. The list could go on.
 
One of my favorites is an untitled work that features a plushy five-point star in shades of light brown enclosed in a red pentagon that fades to pink. These paintings stunningly sum up a moment when Minimalism was giving way to or being complicated by something more emotionally challenging and implicitly feminine and feminist. They could hang in any museum. There is much more to know about Kohlmeyer, a late-blooming artist who had a successful career even without her best work — the “Cloistered” paintings — whose possibilities she unfortunately chose not to explore. ROBERTA SMITH
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News: Berry Campbell Celebrates Women's History Month, March 30, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Celebrates Women's History Month

March 30, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Celebrates Women's History Month

Ida Kohlmeyer
VIDEO: Virtual Exhibition Walkthrough

Women of Abstract Expressionism
 
Inventory Highlights
View Exhibition

Ann Purcell
Upcoming Exhibition: Kali Poems
View Works by Ann Purcell

Judith Godwin
Forbes Magazine: Add to Your list of '5 Women Artists' at These Museums Around The United States
by Chadd Scott

Charlotte Park
Client Testimonial: 
"Extremely gratifying to see Paul Kasmin Gallery's eye-opening summer show, Painters of the East End reviewed by Erin Kimmel in this month's Art in America . And smiled extra wide that AbEx talent Charlotte Park is written up in the same paragraph as — and holds her own with— Joan Mitchell. 'Park's virtuosic oil and crayon compositions (ca. 1965 and 1967) feature dendrite-like configurations in a palette of bright pinks, yellows and blues that appear frozen mid twist.' Ten years ago Christine Berry, owner of one of the most engaging and provocative galleries in Chelsea, Berry Campbell, thankfully introduced me to the work of Charlotte Park, who died in 2010 at age 92 in Montauk, where she lived and painted. She was the wife of artist James Brooks, supporting his career at the expense of her own, and dear friends and neighbors of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner." 
-Adam Beckerman
View Works by Charlotte Park 

Yvonne Thomas
Eazel Interactive Exhibition | Yvonne Thomas: Windows and Variations (1963-1965) 

Susan Vecsey
blue. 
Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, New York
View Works by Susan Vecsey

Jill Nathanson
LINEA: Studio Notes from the Art Students League of New York
Artist Snapshot: Jill Nathanson 

Perle Fine
What We See, How We See
Through April 2021
Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York
View Works by Perle Fine

Joyce Weinstein
Postwar Women
Curated by William Corwin
The Art Students League, New York
View Works by Joyce Weinstein

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News: VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: ARTIST TALK: James Walsh | JAMES WALSH: THE ELEMENTAL at Berry Campbell, New York, March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

VIDEO NOW AVAILABLE: ARTIST TALK: James Walsh | JAMES WALSH: THE ELEMENTAL at Berry Campbell, New York

March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

In this video, James Walsh gives an artist talk for his exhibition, James Walsh: THE ELEMENTAL.

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News: Judith Godwin Studio Visit With the Chrysler Museum of Art, March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin Studio Visit With the Chrysler Museum of Art

March 21, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Dr. Kimberli Gant, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia, visiting Judith Godwin’s studio in Greenwich Village, New York. Left to right: Martha Campbell, Christine Berry, Kimberli Gant, Judith Godwin.
 
 
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News: Susan Vecsey | "Blue" at the Nassau County Museum of Art, March 14, 2020

Susan Vecsey | "Blue" at the Nassau County Museum of Art

March 14, 2020

March 14 - July 5, 2020
Nassau County Museum of Art
Roslyn Harbor, New York

What color means more to us than blue? Even among the primaries, the color of the sky and sea commands a privileged place, by far the most popular hue in the spectrum according to surveys on every continent. Blue casts its spell, pushing beyond symbolism to a deeper emotional level, drawing us into its pure and distant mysteries. Every artist goes through a “blue period,” from the Mediterranean blues of Matisse and Yves Klein to the haunting auras of Redon. Blue has been holy to Egyptian, Hindu, Chinese and Western traditions. Its physical sources (cobalt, ultramarine, cerulean, indigo, lapis lazuli, cyan) are a catalogue of valued materials that rival gold itself. As this exhibition exuberantly proves, the power of blue transcends art history. Poets, filmmakers, musicians and designers have tapped its resonant appeal. The most original music in America (home of bluejeans, “democracy in fashion”) is the blues. We are turning the entire museum over to the multi-media exploration of blue in many incarnations. It spans history and geography, from the precious lapis lazuli of antiquity to paintings, photographs, sculpture, ceramics, cyanotypes, and fashion. As Miró said, “This is the color of my dreams.”

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News: Parrish Art Museum | TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW: Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See, February 25, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum

Parrish Art Museum | TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW: Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See

February 25, 2020 - Parrish Art Museum

TALK: THE CURATOR’S VIEW

Alicia Longwell on Women Artists in What We See, How We See 
February 28, 6 pm - 7:30 pm

Alicia Longwell, the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Chief Curator, Art and Education, highlights women artists in this seven-part exhibition that contextualizes the artists’ work through the lens of how they see and interpret the world around them.

VENUE
Parrish Art Museum
279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, NY 11976 United States 

Order Tickets

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News: On its own terms: “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard, February 25, 2020 - Kim Uchiyama for Two Coats of Paint

On its own terms: “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard

February 25, 2020 - Kim Uchiyama for Two Coats of Paint

Contributed by Kim Uchiyama / “Specific Forms” at Loretta Howard Gallery illuminates a particular moment in 20th century art history where works created by a variety of artists occupied the space between the then diverging ideologies of a young Donald Judd and those of the older critic Clement Greenberg. Saul Ostrow has curated a finely-tuned exhibit that demonstrates the highly individual modes of thought that were at play during this transitional time, ideas distinct from the critical positions of Minimalism, Pop and Color-field.

The movement known as Abstract Expressionism – a “movement” itself comprised of highly individualistic artists – can be seen in retrospect as the physical and psychological response to the global tensions of World War II. Mary Gabriel, in Ninth Street Women, her invaluable contribution to understanding the full scope of this era, emphasizes the war – and the lead up to war – as the underpinning for the formation of a new American art which would reflect the exigencies of the moment. The works in “Specific Forms” came about because these times had changed. Post-war America lacked the angst of the 1940s and 1950s, and was increasingly replaced in the 1960s and 1970s by an art that sought to look to itself reflexively, on its own terms – the thing being the thing itself.

 In an era characterized by an implicit questioning of authority and established norms, these fourteen artists sought to break the mold of existing “-isms” and are seemingly preoccupied in creating a new consciousness via their art. The resulting works are highly specific unto themselves and characterized by strikingly individualistic terms for their existence.

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News: Perle Fine: The Accordment Series featured on Artsy, February 18, 2020 - Artsy

Perle Fine: The Accordment Series featured on Artsy

February 18, 2020 - Artsy

Perle Fine | The Accordment Series 
February 13 - March 14, 2020

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News: VIDEO: Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever, February 14, 2020 - TheaterBuffs

VIDEO: Spotlight on the Arts: Eric Dever

February 14, 2020 - TheaterBuffs

In this video, Eric Dever is interviewed by Patrick Christiano.

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News: Points of Engagement, February  6, 2020 - D. Dominick Lombardi for Dart International Magazine

Points of Engagement

February 6, 2020 - D. Dominick Lombardi for Dart International Magazine

The success of an exhibition, or any work of art for that matter, is its ability to engage the viewer. Engagement can be a bit more difficult to achieve when you eliminate any sort of representation, as with the current exhibition at the Hofstra Museum of Art, Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age. The fact that this show truly connects with the viewer – in this instance, partly through the use and influence of technology – illustrates the more thought provoking side of abstract art. Organized by Karen T. Albert, Acting Director and Chief Curator, with essays by Laurie Fendrich and Creighton Michael, Uncharted quickly draws you in through a variety of means that include everything from hi-tech contraptions to mesmerizing optics. When curiosity is piqued and perceptions are expanded, the viewer becomes part of the expression – a key difference between completely spelled out narrative representational art and non-representational abstraction. That unavoidable brain activity that is prompted by something new or visually foreign is very different than the comfort that straight representation brings.

...

The kinetic sculptures of James Seawright add a strong technological component to the exhibition. Using various sensors, Twins (1992) can be a bit sensitive to the movements in its immediate environment adding to its already palpable creepiness. Gemini (2004) and Lyra (2006) movements and lights are completely preprogrammed. As objects, they give the impression of designs for futuristic theater or movie sets. Despite the fact that all these works are between 14 and 28 years old, they maintain their immediacy and freshness. Like Lynne Harlow’s All Above the MoonJohn Goodyear offers another aspect of physical participation for the viewer. By carefully swaying the picket fence-like apparatus in front of his two paintings, the art immediately becomes animated with short bursts of movement. Figurative Abstraction (2015) has an almost hypnotic effect on the viewer when it is activated – something like fabric billowing in the wind. The result with Diving Board (1983) is quite different. It shows a person’s feet continually being propelled by a very springy board, while offering much needed humor to the omnipresence of more elusive technology.

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News: Forever Is Composed Of Nows: Eric Dever Compresses Time In New Exhibition, February  5, 2020 - Michelle Trauring for 27East

Forever Is Composed Of Nows: Eric Dever Compresses Time In New Exhibition

February 5, 2020 - Michelle Trauring for 27East

“If you have a minute, can I read you a poem quickly?”

With ample encouragement, artist Eric Dever clears his throat and begins. “Forever – is composed of Nows – / ‘Tis not a different time,” he recites. “Except for Infiniteness – / And Latitude of Home.”

He continues, the last two verses of the celebrated Emily Dickinson poem haunting as ever as they teach a crucial lesson: Every moment that has ever existed was, is or will be a present moment, a “now,” and the infinite is composed of them.
And forever stops for no one. It is with Dickinson’s words in mind that, last year, Dever began a new series of work. Each painting would be inspired by sequential lines of “Forever – Is Composed of Nows –,” the next canvas evolving from the previous.

And not long after he started, Dever cast the idea aside, out of sheer frustration — until recently. “Not too long ago, I realized the way to approach it is not to try to illustrate the poem, but to just select certain paintings and put them together, and that could very much hold the idea,” he said. “For me, I think an artist’s entire oeuvre, if we look at it, it really is a collection of ‘nows,’ and it’s not just ‘nows’ that are in the past. When I engage with my work over time, it’s almost as if that time or that place was in crystal. It’s very clear, the whole thing.”

Dever’s newest body of work, “A Thousand Nows” — on view at The Lyceum Gallery on Suffolk County Community College’s Eastern Campus in Riverhead — is a study in compressed time, the 22 exuberant oils layered with colors that span the artist’s lifetime, from his earliest memories growing up in California.

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News: New Peaks for James Walsh at Berry Campbell, February  4, 2020 - Cori Hutchinson for Whitehot Magazine

New Peaks for James Walsh at Berry Campbell

February 4, 2020 - Cori Hutchinson for Whitehot Magazine

Not necessarily spiked, each painting by New York artist James (familiarly Jim) Walsh instead crests like an eggy spire of Pavlova meringue; is viewed head-on as the subtle terrain of a human face. Painted on canvas then mounted, the pure paint impressively lifts off without the assistance of plaster or other molding material. Walsh’s work is distinct from other Modernist abstraction by its textural quality. His life-long professional experience with Golden Paints has rendered him an expert technician and master of patience. The paintings on view at Berry Campbell forego major scale in favor of a very concentrated surface, apprehending the viewer’s eye from an intimate distance. The show’s title "The Elemental," might allude to Robert Rauschenberg’s Elemental Paintings, which gave agency to both the vibrant life and eventual degradation of materials used, or feel back further to Renaissance elemental conception. Questions of alchemy, preservation, handling, and drying time are all brought to light by the reliefs of Walsh.

The compositions themselves range from tufted and pouty to petri dish to epic mixing bowl. There are obvious clusters of like-minded pieces, sharing color or arrangement. For example, BLENDNATURAL, and MAGENTA MAJOR are unified by a lippy palette and quenelle bulge. CRIN CRIN and Untitled both utilize a radioactive green, smeared and smattered, respectively. On one wall, a pod of miniatures express continuity with crinkly white-on-black contrast, blue wash, and confetti drippage. 

Pieces like SAND SOUND align themselves in the lineage of Color Field painter Jules Olitski. SAND SOUND, as well as POSITIVE VENUS, resemble slick sea glass. These pieces recall Olitski’s Plexiglas, 1986 show at KASMIN, particularly Dream Time (1986). Olitski’s hovering color—manifested by the illusion of the depth of glass—is taken up materially by Walsh. SAND SOUND, largely gray and green, achieves a texture that is at once sludge and mist, appearing wet almost. 

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News: Artnet Feature | James Walsh, January 29, 2020 - Artnet News

Artnet Feature | James Walsh

January 29, 2020 - Artnet News

 

Featured Artworks in Gallery Network

James Walsh, Untitled, 2018, featured on Artnet.

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ONE OF THE BEST: JAMES WALSH AT BERRY CAMPBELL

January 28, 2020 - Piri Halasz for From the Mayor's Doorstep

It was standing-room-only at the opening for "James Walsh: The Elemental" at Berry Campbell (through February 8).  Nor did this long-awaited show disappoint: it more than lives up to advance expectations and shows this gifted mid-career artist spreading joy along with pigment and molding paste in peak form. Indeed, James Walsh is one of the best.

True, he has not gone off on any wild tangents in this exhibition.  He is still creating small to medium-sized paintings on canvas, using multi-hued acrylics mixed with molding paste.  And (as far as I know) he still manipulates the molding paste with everything from his hands to a battery of tools.

The molding paste enables him to alter the thickness of his medium from raised curls, twirls, swirls, twists, blobs, and upward or downward strokes or pours of color right down to only barely tinted and scraped areas of canvas  -- often all in the same image.

He has become if anything more adept in orchestrating these opposites from thick to thin.  And he is experimenting – if still very carefully – with creating larger and smaller pictures.

The last time I reviewed a display of his work (at Berry Campbell on June 22, 2014), the smallest painting was 18" x 14" and the largest was 41" x 27¾ ". In this show, the largest painting is 48" x 36" and the smallest is only 6¼" x 4". 

The former is entitled "Opus Eight, Number Twelve (2017). It is unique in its scale, and hangs in a prominent position in the first large space at Berry Campbell.  Done in blacks, browns and other autumnal colors, it is very authoritative-looking, and fits nicely into this front space, which I mentally characterized as occupied by the most ambitious paintings in the show.

(However, I have to confess that the smaller "Crin-Crin" (2019), hanging just to the right of "Opus Eight," seemed to me more successful.  With its green vertical on the top half of the painting, and horizontal strokes below, I was also mysteriously reminded of "The Piano Lesson" (1912) by Henri Matisse.  Aren't art critics irritating?)

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News: John Goodyear | Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age, Emily Lowe Gallery, Hofstra University, , January 28, 2020

John Goodyear | Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age, Emily Lowe Gallery, Hofstra University,

January 28, 2020

Art, science, and technology have become increasingly intermingled. The distinctions between the disciplines are less clear, leading into unknown territory where all things are possible. The eight artists included in Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age, drawn from the membership of the American Abstract Artists organization, explore some of the unexpected ways that math, science, and technology are transforming our perception of the visual arts. Using a range of styles and materials, creating both two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and site-specific works, these artists investigate mathematical or scientific principles, in both explicit and implicit ways, and often use technology to produce their work. The works of art in the exhibition – by artists James O. Clark, John Goodyear, Lynne Harlow, Daniel G. Hill, Gilbert Hsiao, Irene Rousseau, James Seawright, and Patricia Zarate – can be difficult to categorize.

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News: Sarasota Herald Tribune: 5 Artists, January 25, 2020 - Sarasota Herald Tribune

Sarasota Herald Tribune: 5 Artists

January 25, 2020 - Sarasota Herald Tribune

Sarasota Herald Tribune: 5 Artists
Mike Solomon | Established in His Own Legacy

Mike Solomon is the real deal. He grew up in Sarasota in the 1960s and, as the son of noted abstract expressionist Syd Solomon, he was also raised in the larger art world of the time. When he was 15 years old he decided to seriously pursue art for himself. After college he worked as a studio assistant to John Chamberlain, the famed sculptor who resided in Sarasota for two decades. Solomon then moved to New York and returned to Sarasota in 2003. His artwork has won prestigious awards and has been exhibited in prominent galleries and museums across the U.S.
 
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News: EVENT | Artist Talk: James Walsh, January 23, 2020 - Berry Campbell

EVENT | Artist Talk: James Walsh

January 23, 2020 - Berry Campbell

Artist Talk: James Walsh
Saturday, February 8, 2020
3 pm
 
Berry Campbell, New York
530 W 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
 
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News:  'James Walsh: The Elemental' opens at Berry Campbell, January 18, 2020 - Artdaily

'James Walsh: The Elemental' opens at Berry Campbell

January 18, 2020 - Artdaily

NEW YORK, NY.- Berry Campbell is presenting an exhibition of recent paintings by James Walsh (b. 1954). An abstract painter who has been an active member of the New York art scene since the early 1980s. Following in the Modernist tradition, Walsh relentlessly explores the properties and limits of paint and the results of his inquiry are spectacularly wide ranging. Experimenting with innovative acrylic formulas, Walsh produces large masses of pigment that project outward from the surface of the canvas, creating unusual forms in high relief. In some works, the paint is sculptural and three-dimensional, while in others, it rises from richly treated surfaces. Although Walsh makes specific compositional choices, the spontaneous appearance gives his paintings a feeling of the accidental. 

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News: Artist Inspired by Suffolk’s East End, Eric Dever: A Thousand Nows at Suffolk’s Lyceum Gallery, January  8, 2020 - Suffolk County Community College

Artist Inspired by Suffolk’s East End, Eric Dever: A Thousand Nows at Suffolk’s Lyceum Gallery

January 8, 2020 - Suffolk County Community College

Eric Dever: A Thousand Nows, an exhibit of 22 new oil paintings inspired mostly by the East End of Long Island, will be exhibited at Suffolk County Community College’s Eastern Campus Lyceum Gallery from February 1 through March 11. An artist’s reception will be held on February 5th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

Layering veils of exuberant color, Dever creates the illusion of depth while describing atmosphere that falls over views of Montauk Point, Sag Harbor’s Clam Island, and Southampton’s Flying Point Beach. Forms appear weightless and at times dematerialize reversing figure and ground. Similarly, Dever paints his experience of plants that he cultivates in his Water Mill studio garden. Agapanthus, Bird of Paradise, and roses that are past their prime become metaphors for the past, evocative of places and characters from literature.

Dever’s work harkens from experiences deep within his sensory memory of growing up in California.  “Los Angeles is subtropical, the sun is more intense and sets over the Pacific, my paint selection, when working with a full palette has remained consistent, especially a love of Cadmium Orange; but the blue hues I am mixing echo the long late spring and summer twilight of the Northeast,” Dever said.

These sensations inform Dever’s work today here on the East End becoming examples of a type of compressed time.

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Apollo: WHATS ON: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed at the Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota

December 13, 2019 - Apollo: The International Art Magazine

Syd Solomon (1917–2004), who described himself as an ‘Abstract Impressionist’, made the city of Sarasota in Florida his home from 1946 until his death, establishing the Institute of Fine Art at New College, which brought artists such as Philip Guston and Larry Rivers to teach in Sarasota. He was also the first living artist to have work in the collection of the Ringling Museum. Find out more from the Ringling’s website.

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News: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed Opens at The Ringling, December 13, 2019 - Kay Kipling for Sarasota Magazine

Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed Opens at The Ringling

December 13, 2019 - Kay Kipling for Sarasota Magazine

The retrospective of the longtime Sarasota artist’s work opens this weekend.

Prior to the public opening of the exhibition Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed, at the John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art this Sunday, Dec. 15, events open to museum members provided a preview of this retrospective of the work of the longtime Sarasota artist.

Solomon lived and created here for many years, including a long stint at the home and studio on Midnight Pass Road he shared with his wife Annie. He’s famed for his abstract paintings, often involving nature, the beach, wind, the shoreline and more. But the exhibit also allows museumgoers the chance to see earlier works, some figurative, some portraits, and to learn more about Solomon’s background. Both his time spent as a camouflage artist during World War II (concealing Allied planes and troops to prevent enemy attack) and as a commercial artist (creating sign lettering and graphic design) are on view here, along with personal photos and items from the vast Solomon family archive.

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News: Uncovering Top Exhibits on View at Art Miami 2019, December  7, 2019 - Audra Lambert for Ante Mag

Uncovering Top Exhibits on View at Art Miami 2019

December 7, 2019 - Audra Lambert for Ante Mag

Navigating the complex paths presented to visitors at Art Miami is no small feat. Faced with the mountain of galleries on view, we’ve pulled together a handy reference guide for must-see presentations at this year’s Art Miami. Located at One Herald Plaza in Miami (NE 14th Street and Biscayne Bay,) the fair shares the grounds with its sister fair, Context.

From secondary market prospects to mid-career artists, Art Miami marks a diverse cross-section of modern and contemporary art reflecting a wide assembly of tastes. From the merging of digital and material to the large-scale mid-century modernists, no other fair holds quite the range of gems on display at Art Miami.

Make sure to survey the show, and keep an eye out for the following art galleries.

Berry Campbell (AM122) – Frank Wimberley and Syd Solomon steal the show at Berry Campbell gallery’s presentation, while stunning pieces by Nancy Graves, Elaine de Kooning and others round out an impressive survey of painters and mixed-media artists spanning from the post-war period to the present day. Wimberley’s ruminations on texture and minimalism alone feel shockingly contemporary. Syd Solomon’s work will be featured in an upcoming solo show at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, so take a peek at his works on view here to familiarize yourself with his style and deft mastery of color tones.


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News: Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, Yvonne Thomas, Joyce Weinstein | The Postwar Period Saw an Explosion of Female Painters at the Art Students League. A New Exhibition Celebrates Their Achievements, December  4, 2019 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, Yvonne Thomas, Joyce Weinstein | The Postwar Period Saw an Explosion of Female Painters at the Art Students League. A New Exhibition Celebrates Their Achievements

December 4, 2019 - Sarah Cascone for Artnet News

What do Elaine de Kooning, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Bourgeois, and Faith Ringgold have in common? They all studied at the Art Students League of New York—and they are all featured in a new show at the school highlighting the accomplishments of its many women students.

Titled “Postwar Women,” the exhibition, curated by Will Corwin, features more than 40 women who studied at the school between 1945 and 1965. “It seemed like the obvious choice because before the war, most of the women students here were wealthy or had family who supported them as artists,” Corwin told Artnet News at the exhibition’s opening. “During this period, you actually get working-class women becoming artists. And of course, you get the Abstract Expressionists.”

Corwin has put together an impressive selection of works by well-known alumna—Lee Krasner, Grace Hartigan, and Louise Nevelson are also among the big names—alongside examples by an intriguing array of artists who haven’t yet been widely recognized for their talents.

“The league’s list of famous graduates is like everybody you’ve ever heard of,” Corwin said. For him, the curatorial challenge was balancing expectations: ensuring that all the major names were in place while still creating opportunities for viewers to discover new artists.

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News: Perle Fine | Positively Ninth Street Women, December  4, 2019 - Tim Keane for Hyperallergic

Perle Fine | Positively Ninth Street Women

December 4, 2019 - Tim Keane for Hyperallergic

By the mid-1970s, critic Thomas Hess acknowledged the critical favoritism shown to postwar male artists when he singled out the women of the Ninth Street Show as “sparkling Amazons.”

KATONAH, New York — The Ninth Street Show in 1951 is among the more enduring of the origin stories about New York’s postwar art scene, uniting the theme of artist solidarity to the ideal that art can be a vocation unsullied by money and fame.

As the story goes, painter Jean Steubing, working on behalf of her obscure New York artist-peers, secured gallery space in a vacated storefront on East Ninth Street near Broadway. The resulting exhibition was curated by Leo Castelli with substantial input from artists, around 60 of whom were included in the hastily assembled roster. History — or legend — holds that the show was a breakthrough. Museum curators and uptown collectors attended and began to acquire this brave new art. Art reviewers noticed, too. And as the 1950s progressed, New York surpassed Paris as the art-making capital of the world.

In reality, the tale of the Ninth Street Show did not end quite happily ever after. Only a handful of the Ninth Street artists gained increased recognition from it. Even fewer saw any sales. Still, postwar New York accommodated these artists who, for the most part, operated without institutional affiliations. In the 1950s, a downtown loft could be rented for about $30 a month — the equivalent of about $400 in today’s money. So most Ninth Street artists soldiered on in obscurity, getting by through shitty day jobs or family money while finding morale boosts and genuine recognition through their own cooperative galleries. Many finally left the city. Some, like Steubing herself, abandoned art-making entirely.

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News: Perle Fine, Charlotte Park | The Cradle of Ab/Ex, November 30, 2019 - Jennifer Landes for the East Hampton Star

Perle Fine, Charlotte Park | The Cradle of Ab/Ex

November 30, 2019 - Jennifer Landes for the East Hampton Star

The essay for Joan Marter’s exhibition at Guild Hall, “Abstract Expressionism Revisited: Selections From the Guild Hall Permanent Collection,” is notable for reminding us about the people behind the pictures and sculptures. For her, the artists’ relationship to this environment and other factors affecting the work that ended up here are essential to understanding its relevance.

This makes sense in the context of the museum’s permanent collection, which exists only because so many of these artists lived and worked here and left some of their legacy behind as they rocketed to international recognition and acclaim.

Guild Hall, which has recently fully archived and digitized its collection, is celebrating just some of what it has with this exhibition. The show’s unfussy title takes us back to a simpler time, before stratospheric auction results in the tens and hundreds of millions, to when these artists might have been famous and well to do on a more modest scale, if at all.

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News: Art and Antiques: Syd Solomon | Hidden in Plain Sight, November 26, 2019 - John Dorfman for Art & Antiques

Art and Antiques: Syd Solomon | Hidden in Plain Sight

November 26, 2019 - John Dorfman for Art & Antiques

"Painter, camouflage artist, and cultural connector Syd Solomon is emerging as an important figure in Abstract Expressionism." 

Art & Antiques

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News: New York Galleries: What to See Right Now: "Postwar Women" at The Art Students League, November 21, 2019 - Will Heinrich for The New York Times

New York Galleries: What to See Right Now: "Postwar Women" at The Art Students League

November 21, 2019 - Will Heinrich for The New York Times

A surprising number of 20th-century female artists, if they spent any time in New York, had something to do with the Art Students League, a coeducational institution since its founding in 1875. Ahead of next year’s centennial of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote, the sculptor Will Corwin put together “Postwar Women,” an impeccable show of work by alumnae, former models and other connections of the league, in its Phyllis Harriman Mason gallery. Mr. Corwin narrowed his focus to women who were active from 1945 to 1965 but he still came up with a profusion of names and styles: more than 40 artists making everything from social documentary to winsome portraiture to the most stereotypically muscular sort of Abstract Expressionism.

A brace of powerful lithographs by Elizabeth Catlett, a totemic bronze by Louise Bourgeois and Joyce Pensato’s wonderfully spooky charcoal drawing of Mickey Mouse sit happily alongside work by less famous names: The red and green church in Blanche Lazzell’s woodcut print “The Little Church” has a strangely childlike innocence, and Lenita Manry’s delicate but committed oil-on-canvas view of the city from her studio window made me think of the New York School painter Jane Freilicher. The overall effect is to make the ongoing process of rethinking the art-historical canon to remedy discriminatory exclusions feel as exciting as a treasure hunt.

WILL HEINRICH

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News: Susan Vecsey | Architectural Digest: Designer Laura Santos transformed a light-filled, full-floor apartment in a former parking garage into a cozy backdrop for her impressive collection. , November 20, 2019 - Christiane Lemieux for Architectural Digest

Susan Vecsey | Architectural Digest: Designer Laura Santos transformed a light-filled, full-floor apartment in a former parking garage into a cozy backdrop for her impressive collection.

November 20, 2019 - Christiane Lemieux for Architectural Digest

Designer Laura Santos transformed a light-filled, full-floor apartment in a former parking garage into a cozy backdrop for her impressive collection.

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News: Berry Campbell is Now Representing Ida Kohlmeyer (1912-1997) in Conjunction with Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans, November 16, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is Now Representing Ida Kohlmeyer (1912-1997) in Conjunction with Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans

November 16, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is pleased to announce the representation of the Estate of Ida Kohlmeyer (1912-1997) In conjunction with Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans.
 
Exhibition Forthcoming in March 2020
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News: LINEA: Artist Snapshot: Jill Nathanson, November 16, 2019 - Stephanie Cassidy for the Art Students League, New York

LINEA: Artist Snapshot: Jill Nathanson

November 16, 2019 - Stephanie Cassidy for the Art Students League, New York

Artist Snapshot: Jill Nathanson
Exploring the mind and habits of an artist in twenty-five questions

At what age did you decide to become an artist?
When I was a tiny girl I loved horses, pretending I was a horse and also drawing horses. When I first started kindergarten, my horse drawing skill was rewarded: I was honored with the position of glue monitor. I had heard of horses being killed and sent to the glue factory, so I was nervous about a possible connection. I thought of myself as an artist in some way from that early time.

How did your parents react when you told them you anted to become an artist?
My mother was enthusiastic. She was a classical pianist with the highest level of training but a truncated career. She liked the idea of me being an artist even if she didn’t have a clear sense of what that might really mean, and I guess my father didn’t think much about his little girl’s future in terms of career in any case. From my earliest days I heard my mother practicing the classical repertoire without explanations, so I assumed she was making up the music as she went along — creating the great piano works of Chopin, Beethoven, Schumann. Why did she make the song go in that way. Why did the nice calm part become the loud stormy part? When I was a teen, my mother wanted me to go to Bennington College because that was where Helen Frankenthaler, a famous woman artist, had gone. So I went to Bennington early, after my junior year at the High School of Music and Art (now known as LaGuardia High School), thinking of myself as a professional from the start, knowing next to nothing. Bennington College, a key site of American modernism in the 1970s, was very good for me.

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News: Judith Godwin | "Seated Figure" Acquired by the National Gallery of Art, October 31, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin | "Seated Figure" Acquired by the National Gallery of Art

October 31, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin, Seated Figure, 1955

Judith Godwin, Seated Figure, 1955
oil on canvas
210.82 x 119.38 cm (83 x 47 in.)
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Artist

A generous gift to the Gallery from American artist Judith Godwin (b. 1930), Seated Figure (1955) is the first work by her to enter the collection. Seated Figure is a striking arrangement of pale blue, royal blue, and black planes outlined in white and gray that evoke a figure's head, back, knee, and leg folded into a chair. Angular lines, extravagant drips, and vigorous brushwork energize the composition and transform the static motif of a seated figure into a dynamic image. The work shows both Godwin's mastery of the gestural style of abstract expressionists like Franz Kline and the influence of Martha Graham's expressive bodily gesture. Completed when Godwin was 25 years old, Seated Figure is a powerful example of second-generation abstract expressionism by one of the movement's female practitioners.

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News: Elaine de Kooning, Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, Yvonne Thomas, Joyce Weinstein | Art Students League: Postwar Women, October 29, 2019 - Art Students League

Elaine de Kooning, Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, Yvonne Thomas, Joyce Weinstein | Art Students League: Postwar Women

October 29, 2019 - Art Students League

November 2 − December 1
Art Students League: The Phyllis Harriman Mason Gallery

Postwar Women is The Art Students League’s first exhibition to explore the vital contributions of these alumnae on the international stage. On view at The Phyllis Harriman Mason Gallery from November 2 to December 1, 2019, Postwar Women challenges the misperception that great art produced by women artists is somehow an exception rather than the rule. Curator Will Corwin investigates the history of innovative art academies like The League that promoted democratic ideologies, which in turn created artistic opportunities for women of all social classes. This ground-breaking exhibition features over forty artists active between 1945-65, tracing the complex networks these professional women formed to support one another and their newfound access to art education. Postwar Women presents work by some of the prominent artists of the 20th Century like Louise Bourgeois and Helen Frankenthaler, but more importantly it calls out the women who were not credited enough: Mavis Pusey, Kazuko Miyamoto, Olga Albizu and Helena Vieira da Silva – challenging a new generation of visitors and art students to KNOW YOUR FOREMOTHERS.

Featured Artists:
Berenice Abbott, Mary Abbott, Olga Albizu, Janice Biala, Isabel Bishop, Nell Blaine, Regina Bogat, Louise Bourgeois, Vivian Browne, Elizabeth Catlett, Dorothy Dehner, Elaine de Kooning, Monir Farmanfarmaian, Perle Fine, Helen Frankenthaler, Judith Godwin, Terry Haass, Grace Hartigan, Carmen Herrera, Eva Hesse, Faith Hubley, Lenore Jaffee, Gwendolyn Knight, Lee Krasner, Blanche Lazzell, Marguerite Louppe, Lenita Manry, Marisol, Mercedes Matter, Kazuko Miyamoto, Louise Nevelson, Charlotte Park, Joyce Pensato, Irene Rice Pereira, Mavis Pusey, Faith Ringgold, Edith Schloss, May Stevens,  Yvonne Thomas, Lynn Umlauf, Maria Vieira da Silva, Merrill Wagner, Joyce Weinstein, Michael West

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News: Eric Dever | Inspired: Curated by Kimberley Goff, October 28, 2019

Eric Dever | Inspired: Curated by Kimberley Goff

October 28, 2019

 

Exhibition invitation for Inspired, curated by Kimberley Goff of the Elaine Benson Gallery. Exhibition is at Center for Jewish Life in Sag Harbor, NY.

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News: Video Now Available | NYC Gallery Openings | Dan Christensen: Early Spray Paintings (1967-1969), October 16, 2019 - NYC GALLERY OPENINGS

Video Now Available | NYC Gallery Openings | Dan Christensen: Early Spray Paintings (1967-1969)

October 16, 2019 - NYC GALLERY OPENINGS

New York City Gallery Openings Video. Christine Berry introduced exhibition: Dan Christensen: Early Spray Paintings (1960s)

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News: Edward Avedisian exhibited in "The Artist's Choice: Amy Sillman" at Museum of Modern Art, October 11, 2019 - artnet News

Edward Avedisian exhibited in "The Artist's Choice: Amy Sillman" at Museum of Modern Art

October 11, 2019 - artnet News

The Museum of Modern Art is set to reopen after its big expansive and restoration—and when it does, it’s crown jewels, the permanent collection will be reimagined. Old hits are still there, but new discoveries are also worked in. Film and architecture are integrated into the galleries. And the curation, as the New York Times reported, seeks to make room for “detours, anachronisms and surprise encounters.”

As the public gets ready for the new MoMA, here are photos that give a sense of how its new art history fits together.

Image: Ben Davis

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News: Open Season: Culture Preview to the 2019-20 Season, October  8, 2019 - Phil Lederer for SRQ Magazine

Open Season: Culture Preview to the 2019-20 Season

October 8, 2019 - Phil Lederer for SRQ Magazine

SYD SOLOMON AT THE RINGLING  Camouflage and Calligraphy

For Sarasota’s art aficionados and culture vultures, the works of acclaimed abstract expressionist Syd Solomon are well known. And for locals, his time here remains a source of cultural pride and a milestone in the area’s artistic history. But a new exhibition opening this December at The Ringling MuseumSyd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed—proposes to dive deeper into the artist’s early life and inspiration than ever before, presenting a definitive origin story for a man who became a local legend.

Dominating the Searing Wing, Concealed and Revealed brings not only several of Solomon’s paintings to the museum, but also several artifacts from the artist’s early life, most importantly his service in World War II and professional start as a graphic designer and calligrapher in Sarasota, on loan from the Solomon Archive. His son, the artist Mike Solomon, has been working on the archive for five years now, and even he has been surprised by what they’ve found. “The general knowledge was always there,” he says, “but the surprise was in the details, and how it connected to his painting.” When the elder Solomon served in World War II, his camouflage designs hid men, tanks and supplies from German air raids following the Normandy invasion. Fake trees on wheels disguised Allied planes resting on makeshift airstrips. And when Solomon and his fellow soldiers liberated the French town of Roye, they held a big celebration with a parade and a printed poster. That original poster will be on display. And when Solomon moved to Sarasota in 1946, he turned his talents to signage for local businesses and layout work for local newspapers. “And a lot of the look of Sarasota in the ‘40s, in terms of advertising and signage, he made,” Mike says. But more than that, both of these experiences—Solomon the camouflagist and Solomon the calligrapher—would greatly influence the celebrated abstract expressionist he became. “For the people who think they know Syd Solomon’s work, they’ll realize it’s a lot more complex than they thought,” Mike says. “It wasn’t just about nature. It’s expressionism. It’s a personal, autobiographical thing.” Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed opens at The Ringling this December.

 

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News: Susan Vecsey Extends Color Field Tradition Through Paintings of Understated Complexity at Quogue Gallery, October  3, 2019 - Franklin Hill Oerrell for Hamptons Art Hub

Susan Vecsey Extends Color Field Tradition Through Paintings of Understated Complexity at Quogue Gallery

October 3, 2019 - Franklin Hill Oerrell for Hamptons Art Hub

Approaching the Quogue Gallery, I was immediately drawn in by Susan Vecsey’s painting, visible through the side entrance along Jessup Avenue in Quogue, NY. It was awash with warm, radiant color; a vast field of peachy orange. I had seen Vecsey’s work before, in Chelsea at Berry Campbell gallery, and was intrigued with how it would look in this setting in The Hamptons.

I passed through a forecourt with greenery, slate steps and a silvery sculpture by Hans Van De Bovenkamp and stepped into the gallery’s north exhibition space to see Vecsey’s solo show simply titled “Paintings” as it eases into its final week before closing on October 2, 2019. Inside, this impressive painting, Untitled (Orange/Purple/Gold), 2017, greeted me with its vast sky of orange. A circle of the same hue pushed towards the top edge, glowing with a whitish halo. The horizon was marked by a swath of deep purple infused with ultramarine, and a band of ochre yellow suggested sand. I was reminded of our Long Island beaches, in the light of late afternoon on a summer day.


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News: Yvonne Thomas: New York Times | New York Galleries: What to See Right Now, September 26, 2019 - Roberta Smith for The New York Times

Yvonne Thomas: New York Times | New York Galleries: What to See Right Now

September 26, 2019 - Roberta Smith for The New York Times

In the early 1960s, Yvonne Thomas (1913-2009) was one of many painters seeking a more rational, methodical alternative to the untethered, intuitive and often outsize gestures of Abstract Expressionism. The French-born Ms. Thomas — who came to the United States as a child and was a regular on the New York art scene after 1950 — made a series of modest but radiant proto-Minimalist works that, as seen in this moving show, “Windows and Variations: Paintings From 1963-65,” may be the best of her career.

Until around 1960, Ms. Thomas’s loose patches of color had been relatively generic, a de Kooning-infused form of Abstract Expressionism, albeit sensitive in its paint-handling and palette. But gradually she simplified: reducing the numbers of colors and limiting her shapes to a repeating pattern of lozenges or, often, fat, short brush strokes that suggest a form of counting.

Leaning this way and that, these elements floated in horizontal rows before fields of related hues. In “Transition” (1963), for example, yellow ocher, green and black repeatedly change places, defining shiny strokes and then matte background areas, almost in a kind of dance. In “Variations,” also from 1963, shades of red prevail fore and aft, but additions of white and black create shifting lights, shadows and shimmers. The repetition of identical elements would be foundational to Minimalism, but Ms. Thomas was less strict and more expressive. She kept her hand in, adding a fresh directness of touch, and the results give her a place in the still-emerging saga of postwar American abstraction.

ROBERTA SMITH

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News: Mike Solomon | 10 x 10 : Ten Slides Ten Speakers, September 17, 2019

Mike Solomon | 10 x 10 : Ten Slides Ten Speakers

September 17, 2019

10 x 10
Ten Slides Ten Speakers

Art Ovation, Sarasota, Florida
October 3, 2019
5:30 - 7:00 pm

Frank Alcock, Karen Arango, Bill Buchman, Jetson Grimes, Cooper Levey-Baker, Joan Libby-Hawk, Steve Phelps, Shakira Refos, Mike Solomon, Javier Suarez

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News: Eric Dever | Selected for "Geometry" at Site: Brooklyn Gallery, September 13, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Eric Dever | Selected for "Geometry" at Site: Brooklyn Gallery

September 13, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Juried by Phyllis Tuchman

September 20 - October 19, 2019

Opening Reception
September 20, 2019
6-9 pm

More Information

Founded by the ancient Greek mathematician Euclid, geometry is the area of mathematics concerned with the study of space and the relationships between points, lines, curves, and surfaces. In the arts it has often referred to the form and position of parts and shapes, as well as the relationship between those parts and shapes. The connection between are as deep as they are wide. Employing rulers and compasses, Islamic art utilized geometry to create elaborate tessellated expanses, while painters in the Renaissance used geometry to devise evermore realistic perspectives, finding vanishing points and lines of sight. Geometric forms may also be found among textile and folk art around the world. However, it was in the 20th century when geometry came to occupy such a prominent role in art history. Modern painting, from Piet Mondrian, to Bridget Riley and Charlene von Heyl, to name only a few, brought geometry and art into a world of its own. Contemporary artists, in Site:Brooklyn’s Geometry continue and elaborate in this long tradition, using geometric theory, naturally occurring patterns and forms, and other engagements between math and art to explore new syntheses between realism, figuration, abstraction, and pattern making. These works include painting, sculpture, drawing, multimedia, and video.

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News: Gertrude Greene | Baltimore Museum of Art Kicks Off 2020 Celebration of Female Artists with American Women Modernists Exhibition, September 10, 2019 - ArtFixDaily

Gertrude Greene | Baltimore Museum of Art Kicks Off 2020 Celebration of Female Artists with American Women Modernists Exhibition

September 10, 2019 - ArtFixDaily

The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has announced the first exhibition of its year-long 2020 Vision initiative to celebrate female-identifying artists. By Their Creative Force: American Women Modernists features 20 works by artists such as Elizabeth Catlett, Maria Martinez, and Georgia O’Keeffe to recognize the innovative contributions women artists have made to the development of American modernism. The exhibition is on view October 6, 2019–July 5, 2020.

“This exhibition presents a survey of women artists from a variety of geographic regions and socioeconomic backgrounds to tell a more inclusive story of American modernism,” said Christopher Bedford, BMA Dorothy Wagner Wallis Director. “It also demonstrates the BMA’s long history of acquiring works by women artists and our commitment to showcasing accomplished artists from this community, both efforts the museum is amplifying in 2020 and beyond.”

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News: Video Now Available | NYC Gallery Openings | Yvonne Thomas: Windows and Variations, September 10, 2019 - NYC GALLERY OPENINGS

Video Now Available | NYC Gallery Openings | Yvonne Thomas: Windows and Variations

September 10, 2019 - NYC GALLERY OPENINGS

New York City Gallery Openings video. Christine Berry introduced Yvonne Thomas: Windows and Variations

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News: Frank Wimberley | Here Are 23 Outstanding Museum Shows Across the US That You Won’t Want to Miss This Fall, September  7, 2019 - Sarah Cascone & Caroline Goldstein for Artnet

Frank Wimberley | Here Are 23 Outstanding Museum Shows Across the US That You Won’t Want to Miss This Fall

September 7, 2019 - Sarah Cascone & Caroline Goldstein for Artnet

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections From the Ollie Collection” at the Saint Louis Art Museum
September 17, 2019–March 8, 2020

In 2017, arts patron and Saint Louis native Ronald Ollie and his wife Monique gifted 81 works by black abstract artists to the St. Louis Art Museum, including examples by Norman LewisSam Gilliam, Chakaia Booker, James Little, and others. The works, while focused on contemporary art, date back to the 1940s, when a generational shift in abstraction was afoot.

The Saint Louis Art Museum is located at One Fine Arts Drive, Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri; general admission is free.

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News: Susan Vecsey featured in Hamptons Cottages and Gardens Magazine, September  6, 2019 - Hamptons Cottages and Gardens

Susan Vecsey featured in Hamptons Cottages and Gardens Magazine

September 6, 2019 - Hamptons Cottages and Gardens

Susan Vecsey included in ABSTRACT ART SHOWS.

Text reads:
Art lovers, rejoice! Through October 27, Water Mill's Parrish ARt Museum is presenting "Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown," a selection of 30 paintings and works on paper by the late abstract expressinoist, including "Low Tide" (near right). In springs, 11 works by late Queens-born abstractionist Walter Plate included X + Yellow (top right) are on view at the Pollock-Krasner House through October 31st.And the Quogue Gallery is exhibition a number of works by Manhattan and East Hampton-based artist Susan Vecsey, including Untitled (Orange/Blue) (bottom right) from August 22 to October 2.

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News: Perle Fine | Sparkling Amazons: Abstract Expressionist Women of the 9th Street Show, September  3, 2019 - Katonah Museum

Perle Fine | Sparkling Amazons: Abstract Expressionist Women of the 9th Street Show

September 3, 2019 - Katonah Museum

Katonah Museum of Art
Katonah, New York
October 6, 2019 - January 26, 2020

Sparkling Amazons presents the often-overlooked contribution by women artists to the Abstract Expressionist movement and the significant role they played as bold innovators within the New York School during the 1940s and 50s. Through the presentation of some 30 works of art alongside documentary photography, the exhibition captures an important moment in the history of Abstract Expressionism.

The catalyst for this project is the groundbreaking 9th St. show arranged by avant-garde artists with the help of the fledgling gallerist, Leo Castelli in 1951. The show became a pivotal moment for the emergence and acceptance of Abstract Expressionism. The artists of the 9th St. show had struggled to gain critical recognition having been shut out by museums and galleries due to the radical nature of their work. Of the more than 60 artists in the show, including many who were to become prominent figures in Abstract Expressionism, only 11 were women. This is the first time works by these extraordinary women will be brought together since the 9th St. show took place 68 years ago.

In the early 1970s, the preeminent editor and art critic, Thomas Hess, would refer to them as “sparkling Amazons.” These women would neither have viewed themselves as “Amazons” nor as feminists; they simply worked and lived as artists, pursuing their professions with the same dedication as their male counterparts even though the social stakes were much higher for them at the time. Several of the artists, including Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Elaine de Kooning and Helen Frankenthaler went on to have distinguished careers and have found their rightful place in the art historical canon. Others, including Grace Hartigan, Perle Fine and Anne Ryan, enjoyed critical success. The remainder, Sonia Sekula, Day Schnabel, Jean Steubing and Guitou Knoop are yet to be fully recognized by art history, a fact that this exhibition addresses.

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News: Eric Dever, Frank Wimberley | Artists Thinking Outside — And Inside — The Box To Benefit East End Hospice, August 12, 2019 - Michelle Trauring for 27East

Eric Dever, Frank Wimberley | Artists Thinking Outside — And Inside — The Box To Benefit East End Hospice

August 12, 2019 - Michelle Trauring for 27East

Frank Wimberley is not one for procrastination.

Historically, the Sag Harbor-based painter has conceptualized and executed his annual creation for the East End Hospice “Box Art Auction” months ahead of schedule.

Until this year, that is.

For the first time in nearly two decades, the artist was feeling the pressure, considering people are still talking about last summer’s auction — an event he has never missed in its 18 years, and a night he will never forget.

“You know what happened last year, right?” Mr. Wimberley asked with a goodhearted laugh. “I got a bid of the highest it has ever been — a bid of $10,000! I thought it was absolutely amazing. Everybody cheered and jumped up and down. We still can’t get over it. I was at the Parrish Art Museum the other day and they say, ‘You’re the guy!’ It’s nice when somebody remembers you! Everybody likes to be remembered.”

The 92-year-old artist was feeling optimistic ahead of this year’s 19th annual auction on Saturday, August 24, at St. Luke’s Church in East Hampton, where bidders flock to see the collection of small, unadorned boxes transformed into one-of-a-kind creations by some 90 East End artists.

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News: Christine Berry and Susan Vecsey at Guild Hall Summer Gala Honoring Ugo Rondinone , August 12, 2019 - WWD

Christine Berry and Susan Vecsey at Guild Hall Summer Gala Honoring Ugo Rondinone

August 12, 2019 - WWD

Left to right: Christine Berry and Susan Vecsey.
Photo: Aurora Rose | WWD

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News: Charlotte Park Chosen as Eazel's Artist of the Week, August  9, 2019 - Eazel

Charlotte Park Chosen as Eazel's Artist of the Week

August 9, 2019 - Eazel

Charlotte Park’s important contribution to the Abstract Expressionist movement during its early years has recently been acknowledged. Overshadowed by the attention given to the work of her husband, James Brooks, Park kept a low profile over the course of her career, while painting some the strongest and most brilliantly colored canvases of her time. Her art is a strong case against the idea prevalent from the 1950s onward that women were incapable of the muscularity and confidence necessary to be action painters. 

Park initially worked in a monochrome palette, which liberated her to focus on form. By the mid-1950s, she reintroduced color into her art, evolving a lyrical style, in which suggestions of the natural world appeared to pulsate with organic life. By the middle of the decade, she was producing larger canvases with complex compositions and charged relationships of color.

Park did not shy away from strong contrasts and bold, forthright shapes. Uniting painting and drawing, she formed a vocabulary featuring clustered loops, black curvilinear forms that both define and liberate, and tensed and sensual anatomical suggestions. Figurative elements seem to taunt and loom in her art, but are either suppressed or diffused.
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News: Ann Purcell | A Time for Action: Washington Artists circa 1989, August  9, 2019

Ann Purcell | A Time for Action: Washington Artists circa 1989

August 9, 2019

Flagg Building, Luther W. Brady Gallery
George Washington University
June 13 - October 5, 2019
 
 
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News: Frank Wimberley | The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, August  9, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Frank Wimberley | The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

August 9, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Saint Louis Art Museum, Missouri
September 17, 2019 - March 8, 2020
 
 
 
Image: Juanita and Frank Wimberley with Gretchen Wagner, Saint Louis Art Museum.
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News: ArtZealous: 5 Tips to Transform Your Space Using Art, July 17, 2019 - Zoë Van Straat for ArtZealous

ArtZealous: 5 Tips to Transform Your Space Using Art

July 17, 2019 - Zoë Van Straat for ArtZealous

Summer may be halfway over, womp womp, but there is still time to brighten up and refresh your space with artwork. Whether you want to add pops of color to your living room or do a full-blown redo of your house, we’ve got five solid tips on how to incorporate artwork into your home to give it that new look. 



1. Add Pops of Color

To bring your home to life, swap in some light color abstract paintings for wall décor. Any pop of color will brighten the room, giving it a new, cozy and inviting feel. Colorful artwork is perfect for any neutral color walls in the home, and a simple painting can do the trick!

2. Showcase High-End Pieces

If you are an avid art collector or have wiggle room in your budget, try adding a vintage art piece to your walls in your home. Syd Solomon, who was a notable American abstract artist, shares work such as the one below which adds an extra touch to any room.

3. Travel Shots

Incorporating one’s vacation pictures on the wall is the perfect way to decorate a home while giving a more personal and natural feel. Saving your vacation photos then throwing it into a beautiful frame can look fantastic in any room, and also shows off your adventures.

4. Art Sculptures

For a livelier feel, homeowners can accessorize their homes with art sculptures that are sure to make any room pop. Art sculptures are terrific because they serve as a unique decoration, but can also be used to fill up a room.



5. Determine a Theme

From florals to bold colors to fun prints, make your home feel like a tropical getaway or a calming cottage to escape to. Landing on a theme in your summer home can help determine the type of art décor you plan to showcase. It’s crucial to incorporate bright, flashy colors to portray warmth and light.

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News: John Goodyear (1930-2019), July  9, 2019 - Berry Campbell

John Goodyear (1930-2019)

July 9, 2019 - Berry Campbell

John Goodyear
(1930 - 2019)

We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of John Goodyear (1930 - 2019). He was a wonderful man, a gifted teacher, and a brilliant and innovative artist. He will be missed immeasurably. 

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News: Berry Campbell Partners with Widewalls, July  2, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Partners with Widewalls

July 2, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Widewalls Welcomes Perrotin and 18 Other Top-Tier Galleries Into Its Marketplace

Widewalls, the online marketplace and magazine dedicated to modern and contemporary art, is delighted to announce that 19 internationally renowned galleries will shortly join its marketplace, in a collective effort to support the platform's business model and foster competition in the third-party online marketplace sector.

Honoring its commitment to help art professionals access and serve the online art market more efficiently, Widewalls promotes a gallery-friendly business model that allows art dealers to connect to collectors transparently. Through a reasonable subscription fee only, Widewalls provides its members with online visibility and sales opportunities.

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News: The Women of 9th Street, July  2, 2019 - Laura Joseph Mogil for WAG Lifestyle

The Women of 9th Street

July 2, 2019 - Laura Joseph Mogil for WAG Lifestyle

We are very exhibited about this amazing exhibition opening in September at the Katonah Museum. Perle Fine and Yvonne Thomas are included along with Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler and so in.

Join us for the opening in September!


While it’s only July, some things are worth waiting a few months for. One such example is the upcoming exhibition, “Sparkling Amazons: Abstract Expressionist Women of the 9th Street Show” at the Katonah Museum of Art.

Opening on Oct. 6 and continuing through Jan. 26, 2020, “Sparkling Amazons” will present the often overlooked contributions by female artists to the Abstract Expressionist movement and the significant role these women played as bold innovators within the New York School during the 1940s and ’50s. 

Michele Wije, the show’s curator and associate curator at the Katonah museum, says, “Our staff was looking at past exhibitions that changed the course of art history and one of the main ones in America was the ‘9th Street Show,’ which was a kind of ‘Salon des Refusés’ for New York artists who were being shut out of exhibition spaces in the uptown galleries and whose artwork was not being purchased by museums.” 

Wije said the museum decided to give their upcoming exhibition a unique spin by focusing on the 12 women featured in “9th Street Show,” which took place in 1951 and was organized by then fledgling gallerist Leo Castelli. 

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News: The Pure Vision of Frank Wimberley, June 26, 2019 - Franklin Hill Perrell for Hamptons Art Hub

The Pure Vision of Frank Wimberley

June 26, 2019 - Franklin Hill Perrell for Hamptons Art Hub

From the moment I walked into the solo show “Frank Wimberley” at Berry Campbell in Chelsea, I became thoroughly engaged with Wimberley’s textural paintings. The works convey an exhilarating sense of freedom as well as a consistent vision: one major painting after another, evidencing some of the most original and varied paint handling I’ve seen.

On view through July 3, 2019, “Frank Wimberley” is a near survey and presents 20 paintings that roam across the decades (including recent works). Now 92 years old, Wimberley proves that he is still vibrant and active as an artist. He evolved as a pure painter, largely eschewing overt sociopolitical themes in his work and became exemplary of American abstraction’s mainstream; an expressionist responding to free association and guided solely by his own taste and intuition.

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News: Berry Campbell is Pleased to Announce the Representation of the Estate of Edward Zutrau, June 13, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is Pleased to Announce the Representation of the Estate of Edward Zutrau

June 13, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is pleased to announce the exclusive representation of the Estate of Edward Zutrau (1922-1993). Exhibition forthcoming in 2020.

View Works by Edward Zutrau

EDWARD ZUTRAU (1922–1993)

An artist for whom life and art were intertwined, Edward Zutrau worked with dedication, energy, and intensity throughout a long career—lasting from the 1940s through the early 1990s. While he resided mostly in Brooklyn and Manhattan, his travels had an important impact on his creative development, especially the five years he spent in Japan, where his art received a significant amount of appreciation and recognition. Blending precepts of the New York School with a strong physicality, Zutrau’s works draw the viewer into both feeling and contemplation. His art was admired by his close friend Betty Parsons, who held three solo shows of his paintings at her renowned New York gallery from 1972 to 1980. As an art teacher, Zutrau inspired his many students with a love of materials and art as a means of self-expression rather than of technical virtuosity. He upheld the high ideals he conveyed in his teaching in his own work, which was always idea-driven, representing his constant search for clarity and concision.

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News: Abstraction as Continuous Adventure - The Art of Frank Wimberley, June  7, 2019 - Phillip Barcio for Ideel Art

Abstraction as Continuous Adventure - The Art of Frank Wimberley

June 7, 2019 - Phillip Barcio for Ideel Art

More than a century ago, Wassily Kandinsky asked whether purely abstract art could ever achieve the same emotional effect as music. Since the 1950s, Frank Wimberley has been proving that it can, by simply doing it—composing images that pull the human mind and heart along on a journey of feeling, same as a symphony might. One year ago, Berry Campbell gallery in New York announced it had signed Wimberley to the roster of artists the gallery represents. Their highly anticipated first solo exhibition of his work just opened on 30 May. Featuring more than 30 paintings spanning from the early days of his career to works created just this year, the museum quality exhibition breathes fresh life into the landscape of contemporary American abstraction. In fact, the emotional content of these paintings is so condensed it is frankly difficult to experience the whole exhibition in one visit. Wimberley starts each painting with what he calls an “attack”—an instinctive incursion into the blankness. That first, intuitive confrontation with the unknown territory of the surface leaves behind a known quantity: a mark. Like a mystical boat carrying the rider across a spiritual river into the netherworld, that first mark guides Wimberley along through the composition, collaborating with him on a series of choices that lead the picture to its unimaginable, yet inescapable aesthetic conclusions. Imagine a jazz trio: the drummer strikes the snare drum; the keyboard player riffs on that sound; the horn player follows suit; a tempo emerges; finally, the improvisation takes on a life of its own and pulls the players along till it plays itself out. This is how Wimberley paints. Like a listener at a jazz concert, a viewer at this Wimberley exhibition may be best served by an attitude of openness verging on surrender. Pick a starting point and let your eye establish its own tempo. The composition will carry you along.

 

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News: Frank Wimberley Featured in The East Hampton Star | The Art Scene 05.30.19, May 30, 2019 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Frank Wimberley Featured in The East Hampton Star | The Art Scene 05.30.19

May 30, 2019 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

A solo show of work by Frank Wimberley will open today at the Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and continue through July 3. Known since the 1960s for his dynamic, multilayered abstract paintings, Mr. Wimberley, who lives in Sag Harbor, takes the theme of each painting from the first stroke he lays down and follows it to its conclusion, not unlike improvisation in jazz.

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News: Frank Wimberley | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, May 29, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Frank Wimberley | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

May 29, 2019 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Frank Wimberley exhibition, opening on May 30, 2019. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

Frank Wimberley
May 30 - July 3, 2019

Opening Reception
May 30, 2019
6-8 PM

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News: Christine Berry & Martha Campbell: “Art is essential because it opens up new avenues and different perspectives in which to view the world; It fosters creativity in math, science, language and literature”, May 22, 2019 - Yitzi Weiner for Authority Magazine

Christine Berry & Martha Campbell: “Art is essential because it opens up new avenues and different perspectives in which to view the world; It fosters creativity in math, science, language and literature”

May 22, 2019 - Yitzi Weiner for Authority Magazine

Photo: Michael Halsband

I had the pleasure to interview Christine Berry and Martha Campbell. Christine and Martha opened Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea in 2013 and have many parallels in their backgrounds and interests. Both studied art history in college and began their careers in the museum world, but mostly importantly both share a curatorial vision. Berry, from Geneseo, New York, graduated from Baylor University in Waco, Texas in 1992. Campbell, from Greenville in the Mississippi Delta, attended boarding school at Groton School in Massachusetts, and graduated from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2006. Berry received a Master’s Degree in art history and criticism at the University of North Texas, along with a certification in museum studies and education. She worked at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas, as Assistant Curator before moving to New York for a position at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Campbell went directly from college to a job at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. She then decided to explore the gallery world before pursuing a further degree in art history and was hired at age 24 as an associate director at Spanierman Modern in New York. “I loved everything about the gallery world, from curating exhibitions to rediscovering artists,” Campbell recalls. Spanierman Modern, which focused on mid-twentieth century abstraction and mid-career artists in the modernist tradition, was part of Spanierman Gallery, one of New York’s most prominent American art galleries since the 1960s. Berry, who moved from the public to the private sector in several roles, had come to Spanierman Gallery as associate director in 2003. Both art dealers developed a strong emphasis on research and networking with artists and scholars during their art world years. They decided to work together, opening Berry Campbell Gallery in 2013 in the heart of New York’s Chelsea art district, at 530 West 24th Street on the ground floor. The two recognized that they shared a curatorial vision based in “an understanding of art, history, languages, business, and people.” In 2015, the gallery expanded, doubling its size with an additional 2,000 square feet of exhibition space. Highlighting a selection of postwar and contemporary artists, the gallery fulfills an important gap in the art world, revealing a depth within American modernism that is just beginning to be understood, encompassing the many artists who were left behind due to race, gender, or geography — beyond such legendary figures as Pollock and de Kooning. Since its inception, the gallery has been especially instrumental in giving women artists long overdue consideration, an effort that museums have only just begun to take up, such as in the 2016 traveling exhibition, Women of Abstract Expressionism curated by University of Denver professor Gwen F. Chanzit. This show featured work by Perle Fine and Judith Godwin, both represented by Berry Campbell, along with that of Helen Frankenthaler, Lee Krasner, and Joan Mitchell.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us the story about what brought you both to this specific career path?

Martha Campbell: I’ve always loved art from as early as I can remember, but it never dawned on me that I could pursue art as a career path until college. When I entered Vanderbilt, I intended to major in Econ and get a job on Wall Street after college, however, I always tried to take as many Art History classes as I could. One day, as I was talking to my parents about my career after college, they said, “well you know you can major in art history and pursue it as a career.” They outlined that I could work in a museum or an art gallery and with this knowledge, I majored in Art History and upon graduation, decided that I would try out working at a museum and at a gallery to see which I liked better. After getting a job at the Phllips Collection in DC and working there for a year, I was offered a job at Spanierman Gallery in New York. I loved that in the gallery world, you could still do research on historical artists as well as interact with the public on a daily basis. Thus, as soon as I started working in the gallery world, I knew that this was the career path I wanted to pursue.

Christine Berry: My mother was a 5th grade teacher in rural Western New York state (where I grew up). One year as a Christmas gift, she brought home a huge coffee table book on Renoir. I was enamored as I turned every page — memorized by these beautiful painted scenes and rosy-cheeked people. Just after Christmas, we traveled to Boston to visit my mom’s sister. Aunt Dot was painter (with a day job) and brought us to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. As we were working our way through the museum, we came on to the French Impressionism room, my heart skipped a beat as my eyes found the painting I had been starring in the book, Renoir’s “Dancing in the Country (Dance at Bouvigal, 1883).” It was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen (and it was real!). I started to love art, and later realized it was something you could actually study. (Two college degrees, several museum jobs and now owning an art gallery; the coffee table book made a huge impact!)

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News: Sag Harbor Express: Berry Campbell Presents Survey of Frank Wimberley Paintings, May 21, 2019 - Michelle Trauring for Sag Harbor Express

Sag Harbor Express: Berry Campbell Presents Survey of Frank Wimberley Paintings

May 21, 2019 - Michelle Trauring for Sag Harbor Express

Sag Harbor has known 92-year-old artist Frank Wimberley since the 1960s — but in New York, it’s time for a re-introduction, according to Berry Campbell Gallery, who will open a survey of the artist’s dynamic, multi-layered abstract paintings with a reception on Thursday, May 30, from 6 to 8 p.m.

“Over the course of a career that has lasted more than 50 years, Frank Wimberley has felt abstract painting to be a continuous adventure,” a press release said. “The artist is a well-known presence in the art scene on the East End of Long Island and an important figure in African-American art since the 1960s.”

Growing up in the New Jersey suburbs, Wimberley was drawn to art and music — interests supported by his mother, a ceramicist and pianist who involved him in her work, and his father, who gifted him a trumpet.

In 1945, after serving in the Army, he attended Howard University, where he studied painting with three of the most influential African-American artists of the mid-20th century — James Amos Porter, James Lesesne Wells and Loïs Mailou Jones. There, he also immersed himself in jazz, listening to it and playing it himself, leading to long friendships with the likes of Miles Davis, Ron Carter and Wayne Shorter.

But after two years — and with the basics under his belt — Wimberley left, ready to teach himself. At first, he practiced ceramics, following in his mother’s footsteps and influenced by the tactile and sculptural pottery of Peter Voulkos.

“However, on discovering that Voulkos was also a painter, Wimberley realized that he did not need to be committed to one medium, and instead ‘could do several,’” a press release said. “In the 1950s, while living in Queens with his wife, Juanita, and son, Walden, he worked the night shift at a local post office. This freed him to paint and take care of Walden during the day, while Juanita was at work. The post office provided him ‘with money—and time,’ which he felt was ‘the most important thing.’”

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News: Berry Campbell Featured in Wandering Carol Luxury Travel Blog: Things to do in Chelsea NYC, May 17, 2019 - Wandering Carol

Berry Campbell Featured in Wandering Carol Luxury Travel Blog: Things to do in Chelsea NYC

May 17, 2019 - Wandering Carol

Wandering Carol: Things to do in Chelsea, NYC

Visiting New York? Here’s an insiders’ guide to the best things to do in Chelsea NYC and its surroundings, with suggestions on where to go and what to do from two New York gallery owners.  

An Insider's Guide

To get an insider take on the best things to do in Chelsea, I went to the two powerhouses behind Berry Campbell Gallery, Christine Berry and Martha Campbell who have owned an art gallery on 24th Street for the last six years.

I was at Berry Campbell for the opening of my late father’s art show, William Perehudoff: Architect of Color, so I pestered and prodded them (in the nicest way possible, of course) for insider tips on the best restaurants, galleries and top things to do in the area. What I learned was that it’s easy to spend at least one day in Chelsea exploring.

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News: Stephen Pace in Provincetown at Provincetown Art Association and Museum, May  9, 2019 - Provincetown Art Association and Museum

Stephen Pace in Provincetown at Provincetown Art Association and Museum

May 9, 2019 - Provincetown Art Association and Museum

Provincetown Art Association and Museum
Provincetown, Massachusetts
July 5 - September 1, 2019
Opening Reception July 12, 2019
8 - 10 pm  

More Information  

View Works by Stephen Pace

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News: Video Now Available | "William Perehudoff | Architect of Color" Opening at Berry Campbell, May  7, 2019 - Luxeport Intl: Luxury & Creativity In Media

Video Now Available | "William Perehudoff | Architect of Color" Opening at Berry Campbell

May 7, 2019 - Luxeport Intl: Luxury & Creativity In Media

Video by Luxeport Intl: Luxury & Creativity In Media

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News: Berry Campbell Included in 47th Annual Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse, May  2, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell Included in 47th Annual Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse

May 2, 2019 - Berry Campbell

47th Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse
May 2nd - May 30th
More Information

Berry Campbell collaborated with Robert Passal Interior Design and Daniel Kahan of Smith and Moore Architects as well as Sarah Bartholomew Design in the Kips Bay Decorator Showhouse, supplying works by Eric DeverPerle Fine, and Stephen Pace.

Each year, celebrated interior designers transform a magnificent estate into an elegant exhibition of fine furnishings, art and technology. This all began in 1973 when several dedicated supporters of Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club launched the Kips Bay Decorator Show House in Manhattan to raise critical funds for much needed after school and enrichment programs for New York City children. For more than four decades, the show house has been a must-see event for thousands of design enthusiasts, renowned for sparking interior design trends throughout the world. In 2017, the show house expanded with a second location in Palm Beach, in partnership with Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County.

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News: New York-Centric, May  1, 2019 - William Corwin or The Brooklyn Rail

New York-Centric

May 1, 2019 - William Corwin or The Brooklyn Rail

Three canvases hang as looming, watchful presences in New York-Centric, an exhibition at the Art Students League of New York curated by James Little: Al Loving’s stolid New Hexagon (1996), Dan Christensen’s Jarrito, (1997) and Ed Clark’s sensual and lugubrious X-form Untitled (Bastille Series) (1991). While these artists, and the others in the show, fulfill Karen Wilkin’s simple precept from her introduction to the catalogue—that their paintings make “color and the way it [is] applied the main carriers of emotion and meaning”—these works, many of them contemporary but emerging from specific artists’ practices forged in the ’60s, are evidence of a decisive break with modernist tradition. They were a rejection of existing standards of aesthetics, mirroring Pop Art’s rejection of appropriate subject matter but with a more visceral turn. Loving’s marbled blue triangle illusionistically juts out into the viewer’s space, a threatening machine of sharp edges and points, while Clark’s twisting torso-like abstraction mimics the enticement of corporeal flesh. This is color not behaving itself, expanding to overtake the more modernist and Ab-Ex sanctioned notions of “gesture,” “form,” and “mark” to become the main component of painterly composition. Color was accepted historically as a tool to illuminate emotion or psychological depth, but outliers such as William Blake, Hilma af Klint, and Johannes Itten, who foregrounded color as the main dynamo of expression, were relegated to the periphery and seen as overtaxing on taste or engaged in optical trickery. Emerging mid-century, most of the artists in New York-Centric refused to handle color gingerly, and while this novel approach is not overtly political, many of the artists are African-American and several are women, and this alternative approach to abstraction may have functioned to move the form away from exclusionary art historical traditions. 

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News: Christine Berry and Martha Campbell Attend NYFA Hall of Fame Benefit, April 25, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Christine Berry and Martha Campbell Attend NYFA Hall of Fame Benefit

April 25, 2019 - Berry Campbell



The New York Foundation for the Arts
 (NYFA) inducted three arts luminaries into its Hall of Fame during its annual benefit on April 11 at Capitale. The evening’s honorees were Sanford Biggers, a visual artist whose work speaks to current social, political, and economic happenings while examining the contexts that bore them; Karl Kellner, patron of the arts, Senior Partner, New York Office Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company, Inc., and a former NYFA Board Member; and Min Jin Lee, novelist of the best-selling books Free Food for Millionaires and Pachinko(Grand Central Publishing, 2007 and 2017). The gala was Co-Chaired by Marc Jason and J. Wesley McDade, both members of NYFA’s Board of Trustees. The silent auction was Co-Chaired by Marjorie W. Martay, a NYFA Board Member, and Marjorie Croes Silverman, a NYFA Leadership Council Member.

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News: Stephen Pace Painting Featured on Incollect Designer QnA with Elizabeth Swartz of Bunny Williams Interior Design, April 24, 2019 - Incollect

Stephen Pace Painting Featured on Incollect Designer QnA with Elizabeth Swartz of Bunny Williams Interior Design

April 24, 2019 - Incollect

Designer QnA: Elizabeth Swartz On Bunny Williams Bingo, Her Belgian Urn, And That Moment The Art Goes On The Walls

Stephen Pace, Untitled (52-53), 1952, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches.

Elizabeth Swartz was named partner of Bunny Williams Associates in 2017 after a 14-year tenure, which began with a coveted internship. Elizabeth notes, “These days, it’s rare to rise from intern to partner while under one roof. In my case, I found my calling through the apprenticeship tradition much the way Bunny did when she began her long association with the revered Parish-Hadley Associates.” Originally from Wilmington, Delaware, Elizabeth attended the University of Richmond and then the New York School of Interior Design. After graduation, her internship at Bunny Williams Associates led to a job as Junior Designer and she rose later to Senior Designer. “Bunny is an ideal mentor and collaborator and we take our partnership seriously. She sets the stage with her vast experience, practicality, intelligence, and sense of humor. Generous in spirit, she invests in her staff when they show initiative, drive, and talent so I worked hard to meet these expectations. I’m thrilled to have the privilege of leading by Bunny’s example,” continues Swartz. Known for her skill in building stories for beautiful rooms from one point of inspiration, Elizabeth carves out time for personal growth, which informs her designs. When not at the office, reading, visiting museums, or spending time with numerous nieces and nephews, she’s exploring the world and capturing her adventures through her other great passion: photography. A recent trip to Berlin and Vienna are highlights, while future sojourns in Greece, Africa, and Iceland await.

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News: William Perehudoff: Architect of Color | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, April 18, 2019 - Berry Campbell

William Perehudoff: Architect of Color | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

April 18, 2019 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our William Perehudoff exhibition, Architect of Color, opening on March 21, 2019. Please read our online catalogue with essay by Fraser Radford to learn more about the artist and his career.

William Perehudoff | Architect of Color
April 25, 2019

Opening Reception
April 25, 2019
6-8 PM

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News: Columbia Museum explores 'A Life in Art', April 18, 2019 - Dr. Tom Mack for Aiken Standard Art and Humanities

Columbia Museum explores 'A Life in Art'

April 18, 2019 - Dr. Tom Mack for Aiken Standard Art and Humanities

Our country, particularly New York City, became the center of the Western art world after World War II with the advent of abstract expressionism. No American artist looms larger in that movement than Jackson Pollock, and there is no more important Pollock work than his 1943 “Mural.”

Complementing the landmark display of this modern masterpiece at the Columbia Museum of Art is a temporary exhibition of works collected over six decades by South Carolina residents Dwight and Sue Emanuelson. Entitled “A Life in Art,” the exhibition features nearly seventy pieces, from major abstract expressionist paintings to iconic objects of midcentury design.

What is the genesis of this collection? Dwight Emanuelson began collecting art when he was just in his twenties, living in New York City and working as an investment advisor. He had a personal relationship with many of the artists whose work he purchased: “I’d help them manage their money, and they’d show me their art.”

 

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News: Gallery Talk by Karen Wilkin for "William Perehudoff: Architect of Color", April 17, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Gallery Talk by Karen Wilkin for "William Perehudoff: Architect of Color"

April 17, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Gallery Talk by Karen Wilkin  
Wednesday, May 8, 2019
6:45 pm  
RSVP


Karen Wilkin is an independent curator and critic.  She was previously the curator of “American Vanguards,” on view at the Neuberger Museum, SUNY Purchase and a faculty member at the New York Studio School. She is an art historian, curator, and critic, educated at the High School of Music and Art, Barnard College, and Columbia University. After living and working in Italy and Canada for some years, Ms. Wilkin returned to her native Manhattan in 1985. She lives near the Empire State Building with her architect husband and two Maine Coon cats. A specialist in 20th century modernism, Ms. Wilkin has organized numerous exhibitions internationally and written monographs on David Smith, Helen Frankenthaler, Anthony Caro, Kenneth Noland, Stuart Davis, Giorgio Morandi, and George Braque, and is the co-author, with Clifford Ross, of The World of Edward Gorey. She contributes regularly to The New CriterionPartisan Review, and Hudson Review. Her recent projects include a study of Clement Greenberg’s personal collection for the Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon, and “David Smith: Two into Three Dimensions”, the first exhibition to examine Smith’s reliefs as a coherent body of work, in relation to his drawings, paintings, and free-standing sculptures, which will be seen at the New York Academy Museum at the end of 2001. 

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News: Mike Solomon Included in "On the Grid" at VSOP Projects, April 15, 2019

Mike Solomon Included in "On the Grid" at VSOP Projects

April 15, 2019

VSOP Projects
Greenport, New York
April 13 - May 19, 2019

As a formal device, the grid defines and divides space, serving as a framework for which a given subject might be expressed. As an art historical element, the grid has been employed as a compositional guide in renaissance painting, an ideal in the Bauhaus, and a form to be obliterated by the abstract expressionists and action painters. In many ways, modern life has been influenced by grids, from city planning to microchips, and yet, for every practicality imposed on the utilitarian x and y axis, there is a possibility for chance, spontaneity, and art.

Artists participating in "On the Grid" include Sabra Moon Elliot, Darlene Charneco, Bastienne Schmidt, Christine Sciulli, Mike Solomon, Colin Goldberg, Drew Shiflett, Patience Pollock, Daniel Sullivan, Robert Otto Epstein, Ryan DaWalt, and Josh Cohen.

Please contact info@vsopprojects.com for more information. 

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News: Museum Acquisition: Mike Solomon, April 10, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Museum Acquisition: Mike Solomon

April 10, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Greenville County Museum of Art
Greenville, South Carolina

Mike Solomon
Radiant Acquiescence (For Mark Tobey), 2017
Watercolor on papers infused in resin
48 x 36 inches

View More Works by Mike Solomon

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News: Frank Wimberley Exhibiting in "Prime Time" at the Islip Art Museum, April  4, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Frank Wimberley Exhibiting in "Prime Time" at the Islip Art Museum

April 4, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Islip Art Museum
Islip, New York
April 23 - June 15, 2019  

Reception
May 11, 2019
1 - 4 pm  

More Information  
View More Works by Frank Wimberley

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News:  Paint, abstract art, focus of James Little curated exhibition at Art Students League, March 21, 2019 - NADINE MATTHEWS

Paint, abstract art, focus of James Little curated exhibition at Art Students League

March 21, 2019 - NADINE MATTHEWS

In an interview in BOMB magazine a few years ago, artist James Little declared, “I choose to be abstract because that’s where I found my voice, because it best reflects my self-determination and free will. That’s why I love abstraction, it forces us to see things in a different way. It forces us to come out of what we have been trained and conditioned to see. It forces us to use another part of our brain.”

Little’s love for abstract art is now literally on display at the Art Students League, where he is also an instructor. Titled “New York-Centric,” it is an exhibition curated by Little that will run through May 1. As described in promotional materials from the 144 year old institution, “New York-Centric” is, “An exhibition dedicated to color, color theory, design, expressionism. All of the work on display was produced in New York during the latter half of the 20th century or the beginning of the 21st century.”

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News: Joyce Weinstein: Country Fields | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, March 21, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Joyce Weinstein: Country Fields | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

March 21, 2019 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Joyce Weinstein exhibitionopening on March 21, 2019. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and her career.

Joyce Weinstein | Country Fields
March 21, 2019

Opening Reception
March 21, 2019
6-8 PM

Read More >>
News: Gallery Talk by Martica Sawin for "Stephen Pace: Reflections", March 20, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Gallery Talk by Martica Sawin for "Stephen Pace: Reflections"

March 20, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Gallery Talk with Martica Sawin
Saturday, April 6, 2019
2 PM

View Exhibition

Martica Sawin


MARTICA SAWIN is an art historian and critic who has spent a half century covering contemporary art in print and in the classroom. She is author of the seminal publication, Surrealism in Exile and the Beginning of the New York School, and has written more than 100 essays on contemporary artists for exhibition catalogues and art magazines as well as authoring and co-authoring a number of monographs. Sawin served as Art History Department Chair at Parsons School of Design (1967-1995), is founder of Parsons in Paris, was a contributing editor in ARTS magazine, and was the New York Correspondent for Art International in the 1950s and 1960s. Sawin authored Stephen Pace, the critical and biographical text that summarizes the artist's life and art from Pace's early forceful abstract expressionist canvases to the luminous representational paintings of recent decades.

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News: Stephen Pace: Reflections | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available , March 19, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Stephen Pace: Reflections | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

March 19, 2019 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Stephen Pace exhibitionopening on March 21, 2019. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

Stephen Pace | Reflections
March 21, 2019

Opening Reception
March 21, 2019
6-8 PM

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News: Stanley Boxer and Dan Christensen included in "New York -- Centric", March  7, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Stanley Boxer and Dan Christensen included in "New York -- Centric"

March 7, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Curated by James Little  

New York -- Centric
American Fine Arts Society Gallery 
The Art Students League of New York
March 5 - May 1, 2019  

Opening Reception
March 7, 2019
6 - 8 pm

RSVP  

Full Artist List

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News: Dan Christensen, Balcomb Greene, Charlotte Park, Mike Solomon, Syd Solomon included in "A Life With Art | Gifts from Dwight and Sue Emanuelson", March  7, 2019

Dan Christensen, Balcomb Greene, Charlotte Park, Mike Solomon, Syd Solomon included in "A Life With Art | Gifts from Dwight and Sue Emanuelson"

March 7, 2019

A Life With Art | Gifts from Dwight and Sue Emanuelson
Columbia Museum of Art
Columbia, South Carolina
March 8 - May 19, 2019  
More Information

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News: ArtForum Critics' Pick | Judith Godwin at Berry Campbell, February 28, 2019 - Tausif Noor for ArtForum

ArtForum Critics' Pick | Judith Godwin at Berry Campbell

February 28, 2019 - Tausif Noor for ArtForum

That history has so often obscured and overwritten the creative and intellectual output of women is by now a very well-known observation that, nevertheless, continues to sting. “The men simply said, ‘Women can’t paint,’” recalls Judith Godwin, who began her artistic career in the 1950s in New York—Abstract Expressionism’s heyday—alongside contemporaries including Helen Frankenthaler and Grace Hartigan. The men, simply put, were wrong. This exhibition of Godwin’s paintings across the last half-century situates the artist’s early works alongside later pieces, demonstrating her consistent penchant for experimenting with figure, ground, and color, as well as her persistent dedication to playfulness.


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News: Judith Godwin: An Act of Freedom | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, February 20, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin: An Act of Freedom | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

February 20, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and her career.

Judith Godwin: An Act of Freedom
January 10 - February 9, 2019

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News: Art Fix Daily: Exhibition of paintings by Abstract Expressionist painter Judith Godwin opens at Berry Campbell Gallery, February 19, 2019 - Art Fix Daily

Art Fix Daily: Exhibition of paintings by Abstract Expressionist painter Judith Godwin opens at Berry Campbell Gallery

February 19, 2019 - Art Fix Daily

NEW YORK, NY.- Berry Campbell Gallery opened an important exhibition of paintings by legendary Abstract Expressionist painter, Judith Godwin. This historic exhibition is a survey of sixteen paintings, including several large-scale examples from the 1950s originally shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery. This exhibition is accompanied by a sixteen-page catalogue with an essay written by Gwen Chanzit, Ph.D., Curator Emerita of Modern Art and Curator of Women of Abstract Expressionism (2016) originated by the Denver Art Museum. The exhibition continues through March 16, 2019. 

From 1950, when she first exhibited her work to the present, Godwin has held to her convictions, using a language of abstract form to respond with unbowed directness and passion to life and nature. For Judith Godwin, painting “is an act of freedom and a realization that images generated by the female experience can be a powerful and creative expression for all humanity.” Through her studies with Hans Hofmann, her long association with Martha Graham and Graham’s expressive dance movements, her participation in the early burgeoning of Abstract Expressionism, and her love for Zen Buddhism and gardening, Godwin has forged a personal and unique career path. 

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News: Delicious Line Review: Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air, February  9, 2019 - Franklin Einspruch for Delicious Line

Delicious Line Review: Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air

February 9, 2019 - Franklin Einspruch for Delicious Line

Eric Dever's paintings sent me to reread a sestina by Fairfield Porter that opens, "No color isolates itself like blue. / If the lamp's blue shadow equals the yellow / Shadow of the sky, in what way is one / Different from the other? Was he on the verge of a discovery / When he fell into a tulip's bottomless red? / Who is the mysterious and difficult adversary?"

Who indeed. Color theory can be taught. Color phenomenology has to be submitted to as if it were a cruel and mute master. Dever, for four years in the 2000s, restricted his palette entirely to Titanium and Zinc White. That is how the current works at Berry Campbell come into being with such rightness, though his palette since then has burst open like spring.

July 16, Lavender Pilgrimmage (2018) may be the first predominately purple abstract painting I've ever seen that didn't succumb to the hue's clownishness. He accomplished this by adding various whites, including that of the canvas. Much else is at that level or better, including sonorous intonations like April 1st, Hellebores I (2018). May the discovery never end.

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News: The McNay Conjures America’s Golden Age with Exhibition Pairing Classic Cars and Postwar Paintings, February  2, 2019 - Bryan Rindfuss for the San Antonio Current

The McNay Conjures America’s Golden Age with Exhibition Pairing Classic Cars and Postwar Paintings

February 2, 2019 - Bryan Rindfuss for the San Antonio Current

In 2016, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) unveiled “From the Collection: 1960-1969,” a chronologically organized capsule of its world-renowned permanent collection that went beyond the expected paintings, drawings and sculptures to include books, design objects and archival materials in immersive environments that conjured stylized time capsules. Reporting on that inspired reconfiguration, the New York Times pointed out that “treasures long secreted in departmental galleries have come to the center ring, like the Jaguar E-Type Roadster that dominates, perhaps a little too completely, the 1961 gallery.” 

Borrowing creative direction from MoMA’s 1961 gallery, the McNay takes a similarly unorthodox approach to its new era-focused exhibition “American Dreams: Classic Cars and Postwar Paintings.” Organized by the McNay’s René Paul Barilleaux, head of curatorial affairs; Kate Carey, head of education; and Jackie Edwards, assistant curator, it reconstructs a vivid slice of what’s been called “America’s Golden Age” by parking 10 painstakingly restored vintage automobiles inside the museum to engage in “unique visual conversations” with paintings that exemplify artistic movements that emerged from the economic expansion following WWII — specifically abstract expressionism, pop art and op art. 

In addition to paintings by such heavy hitters as Frank Stella, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Indiana and Ed Ruscha, “American Dreams” strives for “strong representation of women artists” by highlighting works by Joan Mitchell, Grace Hartigan, Judith Godwin and Dorothy Hood. It also celebrates the contributions of women in the male-dominated auto industry with complementary programs including a lecture by author, Girls Auto Clinic owner and self-professed “sheCANic” Patrice Bank (save the date for April 4). 

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News: Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air featured in NYC-Arts Top Five Picks, February  1, 2019 - NYC-Arts

Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air featured in NYC-Arts Top Five Picks

February 1, 2019 - NYC-Arts

Interesting. Unusual. Uniquely NYC. Highlights of this week’s top events include “The Art of Fashion,” “Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air,” “Race, Sex & Cinema: The World of Marlon Riggs,” and more. Get the NYC-ARTS Top Five in your inbox every Friday and follow @NYCARTS on Twitter to stay abreast of events as they happen.

Click here for more information.

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News: "Eric Dever | Painting in a House Made of Air" VR Tour with Eazel, January 30, 2019 - Eazel

"Eric Dever | Painting in a House Made of Air" VR Tour with Eazel

January 30, 2019 - Eazel

Click here to Experience Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air as a VR walking tour thanks to Eazel!

 

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News: A Love of Crushed Pigment and Hard Work: Eric Dever (MA ’88) on His Artistic Process, January 22, 2019 - NYU | Steinhardt News

A Love of Crushed Pigment and Hard Work: Eric Dever (MA ’88) on His Artistic Process

January 22, 2019 - NYU | Steinhardt News

Eric Dever (MA ’88) is a painter who graduated from NYU Steinhardt’s studio art program.

His paintings are part of notable public collections at the Parrish Art Museum, Grey Art Gallery-New York University Art Collection, Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York, and Centre d’Art et de Culture, Saint Just de Bellengard, France. He was in the permanent collection exhibition, Parrish Perspectives: Art in Context at the Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York, and on display at the Hudson River Museum in Yonkers, New York. Current exhibitions include the U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong, and Macau, Art in Embassies, Department of State exhibition.

Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air is on view this month at Berry Campbell Gallery in New York City. The exhibit features a new body of brilliantly hued, large-scale paintings, which emerged when Dever was planting a garden at his Water Mill, New York, studio.

We spoke to him about his artistic process.

You paint in New York City and the East End of Long Island.  How do these locales influence your work?

My painting during graduate school, 1986-88, was influenced by urban landscape and physical forms of civilization. New to town from Los Angeles, I spent a lot of time in museums and was fascinated walking around the city and boroughs. My paintings were often elegiac; the AIDS crisis concerned everyone. The city was very exciting, one had the sense that anything could happen, and each day held life changing possibilities.

Since 2003, I have worked on the East End of Long Island. It is always exciting to move to a new place and my paintings reflected this change. I began with sampled color from a new landscape, but soon moved towards a more personal experience which space and contemplation seemed to permit.

Working with just white paint for four years gave me a heightened awareness of my material. Canvas, linen, paint media—painting itself became the subject of my work. The addition of black and red corresponded over time with an increasing awareness of the subtle qualities of ‘Clarity, Passion and Dark Inertia’ (exhibition NYU Kimmel Galleries, 2015), or the 3 gunasa key aspect of yogic studies, and a means of interpreting nature itself.

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News: Eric Dever Dives into Color & Unveils a New Series of Paintings, January 19, 2019 - Pat Rogers for Hamtons ArtHub

Eric Dever Dives into Color & Unveils a New Series of Paintings

January 19, 2019 - Pat Rogers for Hamtons ArtHub

Neon pinks, lush greens, vibrant purples and a variety of orange hues enliven vibrant abstract compositions with direct ties to nature. These colorful paintings that seem to capture spontaneous moments are part of a new body of work by artist Eric Dever. Surprised? Hold on because there's more.

In a groundbreaking departure, Eric Dever has let go of his controlled use of limited color palettes and tight grids to embrace the entire color spectrum and loose shapes that seem to capture a joy that's both quiet and profound. Historically, Dever has slowly been opening his art to color after a period of four years where he worked in white only (Zinc and Titanium White). During this time, Dever discovered the possibilities of the spectrum of white as well as the textural interactions of raw linen, canvas and burlap with paint.

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Color Unabashed in Eric Dever’s New Show in Chelsea

January 17, 2019 - Jennifer Landes for The East Hampton Star

Eric Dever’s recent paintings literally take over Berry Campbell’s Chelsea space. They hang prolifically and fervently on the white walls, bringing the intense hues of spring and summer into the rooms and warming a cold and wind-blown morning.

The show, titled “Painting in a House Made of Air,” comes alive with the artist’s unabashed use of saturated, matte, electric, and often acid color. The paintings offer scattered references to Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, and even Andy Warhol.

The works on view build on a transformation of the artist’s practice noted in The Star in April of 2017. Before a major illness, Mr. Dever had painted the same way for more than 10 years, choosing a limited square format and a palette consisting of white, black, and red in different combinations at different intervals.

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News: Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air - The Art Scene: 01.10.19, January 12, 2019 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air - The Art Scene: 01.10.19

January 12, 2019 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Eric Dever in Chelsea

“Painting in a House Made of Air,” an exhibition of new large-scale paintings by Eric Dever, will open this evening at the Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea with a reception from 6 to 8 and remain on view through Feb. 9. For more than a decade, the painter used a limited palette, but in recent work he has embraced the entire color spectrum. 

The shift in Mr. Dever’s art occurred when a move from square to rectangular formats loosened up his compositions, as “there was no longer a central area of interest, but multiple areas of concentration.” He has coupled his new palette with an awareness of the yogic notion of the charkas — seven energetic centers in the human body where matter and consciousness meet — in which he finds a parallel to the visible spectrum. Mr. Dever lives and works in Water Mill.

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News: Gallery Setareh in Düsseldorf: Only a few were taken in by the Club of the male men, January 11, 2019 - John Torrendo for Wirefax

Gallery Setareh in Düsseldorf: Only a few were taken in by the Club of the male men

January 11, 2019 - John Torrendo for Wirefax

As the Royal Academy in London two years ago, the “New York School” prepared a great appearance, were intended for the painter’s inner self-supporting roles only very sparingly. After all, the Denver Art Museum in Texas, had 2016, also, the artists of the Abstract expressionism devoted to an Overview of the Setareh now has the düsseldorf gallery, are excited to a Review: The thirteen artists in the exhibition – the majority in New York, but also in Europe – quite an expressive abstraction of the day, but found only in a few cases, inclusion in the exclusive circles and Clubs of men. The painters were in turn represented in a large number of, of all things, of the two avant-garde gallery owners, namely the Peggy Guggenheim and Betty Parsons.

The name of the in Dusseldorf, gathered painters, Helen frankenthaler and Lee Krasner, anything other than common. And all of you would like to see more than two to three images from the fifties and sixties. Especially from the in 1923 in Kapuvár, born a Hungarian, Judit Reigl and the energetic Gera Celts images from the series “Ecriture en mass”: instead of appearing to be a cross-format Reigl distributed with the spatula bizarre Islands of cabbage Raven black oil Paint on snow white and leaves behind the traces of the Malakts on the canvas – powerful, these contrasts. The Surrealist André Breton was fond of Reigls way to paint and organized in the fifties, the first exhibitions for the artist, who now lives in France...

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News: Where to see (and paint) abstract expressionism in Tampa Bay in 2019, January  8, 2019 - Jennifer Ring for Creative Loafing Tampa Bay

Where to see (and paint) abstract expressionism in Tampa Bay in 2019

January 8, 2019 - Jennifer Ring for Creative Loafing Tampa Bay

The Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg

The Museum of Fine Arts is currently showing artwork by Sarasota's Syd Solomon. Solomon is locally well-known for helping launch the Sarasota arts scene in the 1950s. He moved to Sarasota after World War II, in 1946, hoping the warmer climate would be better for his war-acquired frostbite. According to his son, Michael Solomon, Syd Solomon's studio home rapidly became a gathering spot for artists and writers in Sarasota. Gather at the Museum of Fine Arts before January 20 to see a sampling of his work.

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News: Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, January  4, 2019 - Berry Campbell

Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

January 4, 2019 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Eric Dever exhibitionopening on November 15, 2018. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

Eric Dever: Painting in a House Made of Air
January 10 - February 9, 2019

Opening Reception
January 10, 2019
6-8 PM

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News: Walter Darby Bannard Reviewed by Piri Halasz, December 11, 2018 - Piri Halasz for From the Mayor's Doorstep

Walter Darby Bannard Reviewed by Piri Halasz

December 11, 2018 - Piri Halasz for From the Mayor's Doorstep

WALTER DARBY BANNARD 

The Darby Bannard at Berry Campbell on West 24th Street show has many more successes, not least because it’s a much bigger show (with nineteen canvases on view).

I counted at least eight paintings that I really related to -- although this show is devoted to a very demanding -- because experimental -- period when the artist was transitioning from his early hard-edged and geometric minimalism to his more mature, free-formed and painterly modernism. 

It is in the nature of experimentation that not every experiment comes off, but as Clement Greenberg once advised Jacob Kainen, in a letter that I’ve never forgotten, the artist must continually take risks if he wants to renew his art (or words to that effect). 

This show appears to stop right about at the moment when Bannard began really ladling on the gel. The two last paintings in the sequence of nineteen here are both embellished with streaks of it.

One of them, “Glass Mountain Fireball” (1975), has a field of fiery reds and oranges, and is embellished with narrow upward squiggly streaks of olive green gel. The effect of such a contrast is spicy and delightful.

One of the most intriguing aspects of this show is the appearance and disappearance of the geometry underlying the free-form. Quite a number of paintings here attempt to juxtapose the two modes, and surprisingly enough, the effect can be very pleasing – or not. 

One of the most pleasing is “Summer Joys No. 2” (1970), with a summery tangle of yellows (lemon & apricot) laid atop vestiges of nine squares in pale tan and pale green.

Another charmer is “China Spring #3” (1969), in lime, mint, khaki and pale peachy pink, embellishing yet diminishing the under-drawing of a large set of tic-tac-toe squares. 

Still, one of the many virtues of this show is that it doesn’t try to establish a straightforward linear progression. 

Rather, it suggests spiral evolution from minimalism to modernism, or what the French call reculer pour mieux sauter – fall back in order to jump further forward.

“Winter’s Traces” (1971) comes early not late in the sequence, yet it is all a symphony of swaying mint, apple green and olive daubs without the slightest hint of underlying squares. 

Two years later, nearly at the end of the sequence, “The Meadow” (1973) is a forthright bright green with decidedly straight vertical lines through the body of the picture, topped with straight horizontal straight lines.

Throughout the show, in fact, the colors are lovely – and loveliest (in my opinion) when not tied down to delineation. One gets this square between the eyes when one walks into the gallery from the street and sees “Peru” (1971) right in front of the door.

Although this is another early one in the sequence, I see no squares at all. But what an exploding galaxy of merry yellow is massed in the center of the canvas, and how loosely yet tellingly it is framed by cloud-like elements of mint green, olive and mauve!

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News: Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, and Yvonne Thomas featured in Setareh Gallery's Exhibition "A GESTURE OF CONVICTION", November 30, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Perle Fine, Judith Godwin, Charlotte Park, and Yvonne Thomas featured in Setareh Gallery's Exhibition "A GESTURE OF CONVICTION"

November 30, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Berry Campbell is pleased to collaborate with SETAREH GALLERY in Düsseldorf to celebrate women in art with the exhibition "GESTURE OF CONVICTION | Women of Abstract Expressionism" open from December 1, 2018 to February 29, 2019.

http://www.setareh-gallery.com/a-gesture-of-conviction.html

Image: © James Brooks and Charlotte Park Foundation

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News: Art meets Art! Art meets Art! Art Shamsky from the 1969 World Champion NY Mets visits Berry Campbell, November 29, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Art meets Art! Art meets Art! Art Shamsky from the 1969 World Champion NY Mets visits Berry Campbell

November 29, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Art Shamsky from the 1969 World Champion NY Mets visited Berry Campbell yesterday!

See now on our Instagram!

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News: Balcomb Greene, Raymond Hendler, and Ann Purcell featured in show room Designed by Garrow Kedigian for Kravet | Lee Jofa | Brunschwig & Fils New York City, November 27, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Balcomb Greene, Raymond Hendler, and Ann Purcell featured in show room Designed by Garrow Kedigian for Kravet | Lee Jofa | Brunschwig & Fils New York City

November 27, 2018 - Berry Campbell

We are so pleased to have been able to work with Garrow Kedigian Interior Design for Kravet | Lee Jofa | Brunschwig & Fils New York City for this fabulous show room! Paintings on loan by Balcomb Greene, Raymond Hendler and Ann Purcell. Please visit the D & D building when you are in the neighborhood!

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News: Frank Stella on Walter Darby Bannard | Institute of Contemporary Arts, Miami: , November 15, 2018 - ICA Miami

Frank Stella on Walter Darby Bannard | Institute of Contemporary Arts, Miami:

November 15, 2018 - ICA Miami

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News: Discussion with Mike Solomon about "Syd Solomon: Views from Above" at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, November 10, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Discussion with Mike Solomon about "Syd Solomon: Views from Above" at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

November 10, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Discussion with Mike Solomon about Syd Solomon: Views from Above
Cocktails & Collections
Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Thursday, November 15, 2018
5 - 7 PM

RSVP

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News: Susan Vecsey Reviewed in Delicious Line, November 10, 2018 - Maria-Lisa Farmakidis for Delicious Line

Susan Vecsey Reviewed in Delicious Line

November 10, 2018 - Maria-Lisa Farmakidis for Delicious Line

The appearance of effortless beauty is not easy to produce. But this is the aspiration of Susan Vecsey's current show at Berry Campbell, an exhibition of twenty recent paintings, including her largest to date.

The artist has been working on this series of abstractions from nature for over a decade. She pours one layer at a time over a textured Belgian linen, creating subtle variations on the surface. Every next pour is a new layer of calculated risk.

Untitled (Blue/Gold) (all are 2018) is a six-foot square, most of which is a light gray. Across the lower edge, bands of vibrant gold, blue, and blue-black create a wide expanse that envelops the viewer.

The dark blues and deep reds in Untitled (Nocturne) are a new experiment. That composition and Untitled (Nocturne II) extend her range as a colorist, with wide spaces that shimmer with iridescence. 

Vecsey's paintings are entirely concerned with color, light, and surface. They require looking at up close, in person.

More Information

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News: Walter Darby Bannard: Paintings from 1969 to 1975 | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, November  8, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Walter Darby Bannard: Paintings from 1969 to 1975 | Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

November 8, 2018 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Walter Darby Bannard exhibitionopening on November 15, 2018. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

Walter Darby Bannard: Paintings from 1969 to 1975
November 15 - December 21, 2018

Opening Reception
November 15, 2018
6 - 8 PM

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News: Frank Wimberley Exhibited at 55 Walker, November  2, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Frank Wimberley Exhibited at 55 Walker

November 2, 2018 - Berry Campbell

News: Guild Hall: Syd Solomon Lecture with Gail levin, Ph.D., October 31, 2018 - Guild Hall

Guild Hall: Syd Solomon Lecture with Gail levin, Ph.D.

October 31, 2018 - Guild Hall

Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton
Saturday, November 3, 2018

12:00 pm
Free Admission
RSVP

Join Gail Levin, Ph.D., in the Boots Lamb Education Center for a lecture on the artist Syd Solomon (1917-2004) whose work is on view in the exhibition Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed. Levin is a primary contributor to the exhibition catalogue. She has also authored Lee Krasner: A Biography, in addition to many other works.

Gail Levin (Ph.D., Rutgers University) is Professor of Art History, American Studies and Women Studies at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of CUNY. She is an art historian specializing in art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with diverse research interests that include the work of Edward Hopper, Marsden Hartley, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Judy Chicago, women artists, Jewish artists, Chinese emigre artists, and contemporary art of the United States, Europe, and Japan, as well as American Studies and the cinema. 

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News: Hiding in Plain Sight at Amar Gallery included in Vanity Fair London's Pick of Frieze Week, October 24, 2018 - Thomas Barrie for Vanity Fair

Hiding in Plain Sight at Amar Gallery included in Vanity Fair London's Pick of Frieze Week

October 24, 2018 - Thomas Barrie for Vanity Fair

Amar Singh’s eponymous Islington gallery has a simple but laudable ethos, specializing in exhibitions of LGBTQ and female artists with diverse, progressive narratives. Raised in London but a member of the royal Kapurthala family of Punjab, Singh was one of many political campaigners who made up a global coalition that last month recorded a landmark legal victory in India, overturning the country’s 2013 criminalization of gay sex. Now, Amar Gallery is turning to one of the lesser-known histories of art, with an exhibition of the women behind Abstract Expressionism in 1950s and 60s America. Lynne Mapp DrexlerElaine de KooningJoan MitchellGrace Hartigan and myriad others take pride of place in Hiding in Plain Sight, which explores the female painters who have been neglected in favour of their more barnstorming counterparts—the Rothkos, the Pollocks and the Newmans. There’s a pioneering spirit to the paintings, be they the natural blooms Drexler cultivated on her canvases, or the liquid colour-field stains of Helen Frankenthaler, made all the more engrossing by the fact that many of these artists have never been exhibited in the U.K. before.

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News: See expressionist art from late Sarasota artist Syd Solomon in St. Petersburg, October 24, 2018 - Cathy Salustri for Tampa Bay Creative Loafing

See expressionist art from late Sarasota artist Syd Solomon in St. Petersburg

October 24, 2018 - Cathy Salustri for Tampa Bay Creative Loafing

You may not have heard of Syd Solomon (but we bet you have), but his presence, even posthumously (he died in 2004) still vibrates through Sarasota. He came to Sarasota because of the Battle of the Bulge. For real — he was an aerial camouflage specialist in WWII, and he came away from the Battle of the Bulge with a nasty case of frostbite. After that, no one could blame him from wanting to keep warm, and so, in 1946, he and his bride decided to call Sarasota home. 

He was the driving force behind the Fine Arts Institute at Sarasota's New College, not only helping to start the Institute but also encouraging his friends — all artists — to teach there. Those friends? Conrad Marca-Relli (1913-2000), Larry Rivers (1923-2002) and Philip Guston (1913-1980).

No shocker, then, that the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art accessioned his art — marking the first time that the Ringling accessioned a living artist. 

Come see Views from Above, a collection of Solomon's abstract expressionist work, at St. Petersburg's Museum of Fine Arts. The work starts in 1945 and runs through the 1980s, and it's all influenced by his chosen home (Florida!). One of his works ("Westcoastalscape") is pictured above and part of the MFA's permanent collection.

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News: Clara Eagle Gallery Features the Women of the American Abstract Artists Movement, October 22, 2018 - Tracy Ross & Melanie David for WKMS Murray State's NPR Station

Clara Eagle Gallery Features the Women of the American Abstract Artists Movement

October 22, 2018 - Tracy Ross & Melanie David for WKMS Murray State's NPR Station

The American Abstract Artist movement was founded in 1936 in New York City, at a time when abstract art was met with strong critical resistance. Women played an integral part in forming the AAA, and Murray State's Clara M. Eagle gallery is housing an exhibit that honors these groundbreaking female artists. Emily Berger, an abstract artist featured in the exhibit, and T. Michael Martin, director of university galleries, visit Sounds Good to discuss the traveling exhibit. 

The Murray State University Galleries and the department of art and design present Blurring Boundaries: Continuity to Change - The Women of AAA 1936-2018through the beginning of November. In the first exhibition dedicated exlusively to the intergenerational group of women artists of American Abstract Artists, Blurring Boundaries traces the history of AAA's female founding members through present-day artists. The exhibition highlights approximately 45 works, emphasizing each artist's approach to central tenents of abstraction - composition, color, content, and material. Well-known founders and early members of AAA, such as Perle Fine, Esphyr Slobodkina, Gertrude Greene, Alice Trumbull Mason (featured above), and I. Rice Pereira, are included in the exhibit. Their classic works will be displayed beside contemporary abstract artists such as Sharon Brant, Merrill Wagner, Cecily Kahn, Alice Adams, and Emily Berger.

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News: Johnson, Kriendler, and Solomon Solo at Guild Hall, October 18, 2018 - Jennifer Landes for The East Hampton Star

Johnson, Kriendler, and Solomon Solo at Guild Hall

October 18, 2018 - Jennifer Landes for The East Hampton Star

“Please Send To: Ray Johnson” is predominently a collection of “Mail Art” Johnson sent to Ted Carey, left to the museum by Tito Spiga as part of his bequest. “Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed” operates as a retrospective of the artist, who died in 2004, using his archive to provide new context to his output from his early days before and after World War II, when he devised camouflage techniques for the military, to late work from the early 1990s. Finally, “Sara Mejia Kriendler: In Back of Beyond” will showcase the artist’s Colombian roots with sculptures in terra-cotta, plaster, and gold leaf that also reference today’s consumer culture. Ms. Kriendler was the recipient of top honors in the 2016 members show.

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News: Susan Vecsey | The Art Scene: 10.11.18, October 11, 2018 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Susan Vecsey | The Art Scene: 10.11.18

October 11, 2018 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Susan Vecsey in Chelsea

A solo show of paintings by Susan Vecsey, who lives and works in New York City and East Hampton, will open Thursday at the Berry Campbell Gallery in Chelsea with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and continue through Nov. 10. 

Ms. Vescey’s recent abstractions call to mind both Color Field painting and landscapes. The woods, beaches, farms, and big skies of the East End inspire her, but her work strips those images of their specificity, resulting in “abstract art that looks familiar,” according to a release.

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News: NYC Gallery Scene - Highlights of New Shows Opening, October 10, 2018 - Hamptons ArtHub

NYC Gallery Scene - Highlights of New Shows Opening

October 10, 2018 - Hamptons ArtHub

Berry Campbell: “Susan Vecsey”
October 11 through November 10, 2018
Opening Reception: Thursday, October 11, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Berry Campbell Gallery presents “Susan Vecsey,” featuring recent paintings by the artist. The exhibition marks the artist’s third solo exhibition since her representation by the gallery began in 2014. Referencing Color Field paintings, Vecsey’s landscapes are inspired by the East End of Long Island. The paintings act as elusive reminders of memories or recollections, according to the gallery, evoking calm and serenity. Susan Vecsey lives and works in NYC and East Hampton. Her art is held in numerous public and private collections including Guild Hall in East Hampton, NY.

Click here for exhibition details.

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News: Must-see museum exhibits on Long Island , October  6, 2018 - Steve Parks for Newsday

Must-see museum exhibits on Long Island

October 6, 2018 - Steve Parks for Newsday

SYD SOLOMON and PLEASE SEND TO: RAY JOHNSON
Oct. 20-Dec. 17
Guild Hall

Through his New York Correspondence School in the 1950s, Ray Johnson started his own art movement — Mail Art. Johnson networked with other artists to whom he mailed drawings, poems and collages, asking them to add their touches and forward it to another member of the group. Guild Hall’s second major gallery will explore the career of Syd Solomon, self-described “Abstract Impressionist” whose paintings were inspired by the natural environment surrounding his homes in the Hamptons and Florida.

631-324-0806
guildhall.org

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News: Susan Vecsey 2018 Exhibition Catalogue Now Available, October  6, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Susan Vecsey 2018 Exhibition Catalogue Now Available

October 6, 2018 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our Susan Vecsey exhibitionopening on September 6, 2018. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

Susan Vecsey
October 11 - November 10

Opening Reception 
Thursday, October 11, 2018
6 - 8 pm

Read More >>
News: One More Month to See Ann Purcell's painting 'Harting' in Full Circle | Hue and Saturation in the Washington Color School , October  5, 2018 - Corcoran School of the Arts & Design

One More Month to See Ann Purcell's painting 'Harting' in Full Circle | Hue and Saturation in the Washington Color School

October 5, 2018 - Corcoran School of the Arts & Design

June 14 - October 26, 2018
Luther W. Brady Art Gallery
The Corcoran School of the Arts & Design
The George Washington University

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News: Berry Campbell Gallery to show at Art Miami 2018, October  2, 2018 - Art Miami

Berry Campbell Gallery to show at Art Miami 2018

October 2, 2018 - Art Miami

Art Miami, returning for its 29th edition on December 4 - 9, 2018, has announced its 2018 exhibitor list. Recognized as one of the preeminent international modern and contemporary art fairs, Art Miami will showcase an array of iconic and important art works, dynamic projects and special installations from more than 160 international galleries from nearly 30 countries representing 68 cities.  

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News: Alfonso Ossorio: A Personal Perspective on His Art and Influence, September 27, 2018 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

Alfonso Ossorio: A Personal Perspective on His Art and Influence

September 27, 2018 - Mark Segal for The East Hampton Star

What made Mike Solomon’s talk about Alfonso Ossorio and the Creeks so captivating was that, as he put it, “It is a personal as well as a cultural history.” An overflow audience packed the Baldwin Family Lecture Room at the East Hampton Library to hear Mr. Solomon, an artist and founding director of the Ossorio Foundation, discuss Ossorio’s art, his generosity, and his influence in the art world of the 1950s and beyond.

The Solomon family — Syd, an important abstract painter, his wife, Annie, and their two children, Mike and Michele — lived at the Creeks, Ossorio’s 57-acre estate on Georgica Pond in East Hampton, for three months in 1959. Thirty years later, Mike returned to East Hampton with his wife and 2-year-old son to work as Ossorio’s studio assistant. After the artist’s death a year later, he became the director of the foundation established by Ted Dragon, Ossorio’s life partner and heir.

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News: Syd Solomon | Views From Above, September 25, 2018 - Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida

Syd Solomon | Views From Above

September 25, 2018 - Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida

September 29, 2018 - January 20, 2019
Museum of Fine Arts
St. Petersburg, Florida

Syd Solomon’s (American, 1917–2004) gestural canvases are exemplary of the tenets of Abstract Expressionism, as seen in the large-scale painting Westcoastalscape (1968) currently on view in the Acheson Gallery.  He has stated, “I am interested in the immediate, the chance and the transitory aspects […] in my work.  The truth of the moment, I believe may frequently be the artist’s opening to permanent quality.”  His multilayered paintings, characterized by stunning sweeps of color contrasts, are inspired by nature, and specifically the Florida landscape.  This Spotlight exhibition brings together works ranging from 1945 through the 1980s, drawn from the Museum collection as well as the Estate of Syd Solomon, which has also loaned archival images and publications.

After serving in WWII, Solomon divided his time between Sarasota, where he established the Institute of Fine Art at New College, and East Hampton, New York. At his invitation, a distinguished group of artists taught at New College in the 1960s including Conrad Marca-Relli, Larry Rivers, and Philip Guston.

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News: Want to Get Rich Buying Art? Invest in Women, September 24, 2018 - Mary Gabriel for The New York Times

Want to Get Rich Buying Art? Invest in Women

September 24, 2018 - Mary Gabriel for The New York Times

More than ever, female artists are breaking sales records and being recognized for their role in important art movements.

Once, when asked about discrimination against female artists, the Abstract Expressionist Lee Krasner said the bias was as old as Judeo-Christian history. Brushing aside the weight of that realization, she added, “There’s nothing I can do about those 5,000 years.” She painted anyway, as have women throughout the ages who have continued to create despite official disdain.

Centuries and decades later, it seems their persistence may be finally paying off. Galleries are adding more women to their rosters, museums like the Uffizi in Florence are combing their storage facilities in search of treasures that deserve airing, and numerous institutions have been mounting exhibitions of art by women. On the eve of this fall’s auction season, the art market appears to be experiencing a long overdue correction.

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News: Let’s Hear It For The Ladies Who Paint, September 24, 2018 - Ian Marcus Corbin for Spectator USA

Let’s Hear It For The Ladies Who Paint

September 24, 2018 - Ian Marcus Corbin for Spectator USA

The works of female painters were consistently undervalued by auction houses – but that’s all changing.

It has been several decades since the art world – that swirling miasma of idealism, virtuosity, pretense and money – has recognised the men of the New York School, also known as the Abstract Expressionists, as truly great artists. Paintings by Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell and Willem de Kooning have long been in high demand, now more than ever; their canvases regularly fetch hilarious sums, well into the eight and nine figures. 

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News: Mike Solomon at East Hampton Library | A Small Survey of Works From 2015 to the Present, September  4, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Mike Solomon at East Hampton Library | A Small Survey of Works From 2015 to the Present

September 4, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Mike Solomon at East Hampton Library
East Hampton Public Library
September 15 - October 10, 2018

Opening Reception
September 15, 2018
7 PM

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News: Lecture with Mike Solomon | THE CREEKS: Epicenter of the 1950s Hamptons Art Community, September  4, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Lecture with Mike Solomon | THE CREEKS: Epicenter of the 1950s Hamptons Art Community

September 4, 2018 - Berry Campbell

The Creeks: Epicenter of the 1950s Hamptons Art Community
East Hampton Library | Baldwin Family Lecture Room
Saturday, September 15, 2018 
6 - 7 pm

RSVP

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News: John Goodyear Online Catalogue Now Available, August 29, 2018 - Berry Campbell

John Goodyear Online Catalogue Now Available

August 29, 2018 - Berry Campbell

We are preparing for our John Goodyear exhibition, Distillation and Witopening on September 6, 2018. Please read our online catalogue to learn more about the artist and his career.

John Goodyear
Distillation and Wit
September 6 - October 6, 2018

Opening Reception 
Thursday, September 6, 2018
6 - 8 pm

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News: “Walter Darby Bannard: 1959–1962” at ICA, Miami, August 29, 2018 - Blouin ArtInfo

“Walter Darby Bannard: 1959–1962” at ICA, Miami

August 29, 2018 - Blouin ArtInfo

The Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, is hosting ”Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962,” a focused show exhibiting the breakthrough works of the American abstract painter. On view through January 6, 2019, the exhibition showcases some of the early and rarely seen works of the artist.

“Walter Darby Bannard: 1959-1962” focuses on a significant period of the artist career — a time when he abandoned gestural brushwork and developed a pared-down geometric vocabulary. The period on focus represented for Bannard a moment of reckoning with the lessons and legacy of Abstract Expressionism. Bannard who lived in Princeton, New Jersey, at the time, had the desire to usher in a new era in American painting.

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News: Frank Wimberley Exhibiting in "Acts of Art + Rebuttal in 1971" at Leubsdorf Gallery, August 27, 2018 - Hunter College Art Galleries

Frank Wimberley Exhibiting in "Acts of Art + Rebuttal in 1971" at Leubsdorf Gallery

August 27, 2018 - Hunter College Art Galleries

Acts of Art + Rebuttal in 1971
Leubsdorf Gallery
October 5, 2018–November 25, 2018


Acts of Art and Rebuttal revisits the 1971 exhibition Rebuttal to the Whitney Museum Exhibition: Black Artists in Rebuttal, which was organized by members of the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition at Acts of Art, a small, artist-run gallery in Greenwich Village. The original exhibition was mounted in response to the Whitney Museum’s refusal to appoint a Black curator for their survey Contemporary Black Artists in America.

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News: Larry Zox Exhibited at the Nassau County Museum of Art, August 27, 2018 - A. E. Colas for ZealNYC

Larry Zox Exhibited at the Nassau County Museum of Art

August 27, 2018 - A. E. Colas for ZealNYC

Art Break: Museums of Long Island Are Steeped in History While Capitalizing on Their Picturesque Settings

When people think of Long Island, they tend to think about the outdoors: the beaches, ocean, parks, wineries – even the best mall on the Island is an outdoor one. Not Art Break! When we think of Long Island what springs to mind are the artists’ colonies of the East End and North Fork, the sculpture gardens of Nassau and Suffolk counties, and the community involvement of so many museums.

Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn Harbor, located on the old Frick estate, is known for specializing in 19th and 20th century American and European art as well as having a beautiful garden, well-marked nature trails, and an excellent sampling of modern sculpture on display. There are two special exhibitions currently on view: True Colors and A Mirror to Nature: Sculpture by Marko Remec (both ongoing).

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News: Syd Solomon Exhibited in "The Permanent Collection: A 30- Year Survey" at The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center, August 23, 2018 - Sarah Drake for Hamptons Art Hub

Syd Solomon Exhibited in "The Permanent Collection: A 30- Year Survey" at The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center

August 23, 2018 - Sarah Drake for Hamptons Art Hub

Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center: “The Permanent Collection: A 30-Year Survey”
August 2, 2018 through October 27, 2018

The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center presents “The Permanent Collection: A 30-Year Survey” featuring highlights such Composition with Red Arc and Horses, a 1930’s painting by Jackson Pollock, and a wooden bird house made by Pollock in the 1940s.

In addition to art by Jackson Pollock, the survey includes artworks by Lee Krasner, Mike Bidlo, Thomas Hart Benton, James Brooks, Stanley William Hayter, David Slivka and Syd Solomon. Photography by Dan Budnik, Robert Giard, Bernard Gotfryd, Barbara Kasten, Fred McDarrah, Hans Namuth, Tony Vaccaro and Wilfrid Zogbaum are also part of the show.

The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center is located at 830 Springs-Fireplace Road, East Hampton, NY 11937.

Click here for exhibition details

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News: The State of Art: Ground Zero Looks Back at 2 Decades of Visual Art, August 21, 2018 - L. Kent Wolgamott for Lincoln Journal Star

The State of Art: Ground Zero Looks Back at 2 Decades of Visual Art

August 21, 2018 - L. Kent Wolgamott for Lincoln Journal Star

This list of 20 Includes exhibitions in Lincoln, Omaha, Des Moines, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York. I saw the latter three when I was one of 12 American fellows in the International Arts Journalism Institute in Visual Art in 2009.

“Now’s The Time,” Sheldon Museum of Art, 2017

There were multiple Sheldon shows drawn from its collection that I considered for this list. I ended up choosing the one that is most in my wheelhouse — "Now’s The Time,” an exhibition of Sheldon’s abstract expressionist works conceived by director and chief curator Wally Mason after “Yellow Band,” the museum’s Mark Rothko masterwork was exhibited in an AE survey in London and Bilbao, Spain.

A who’s who of mid-century artists, the smartly hung show included works by Barnett Newman, Han Hoffman, Robert Motherwell, Clyfford Still, Willem deKooning, Franz Kline, Jackson Pollock, Philip Guston, Lee Krasner along with newly acquired works by Judith Godwin and Perle Fine. That’s an impressive lineup for any museum, particularly a university museum in the middle of the country.

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News: Honoring Stephen Pace, August 21, 2018 - Emma Corry for The Shield

Honoring Stephen Pace

August 21, 2018 - Emma Corry for The Shield

“Stephen Pace: An Artist’s Process” honors Stephen Pace for the 10th anniversary of the McCutchan Art Center/Pace Galleries and will be displayed until Sept. 10.

Susan Sauls said artists don’t just sit down and create a masterpiece.

The university’s summer exhibit, “Stephen Pace: An Artist’s Process” features the work of Stephen Pace to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the McCutchan Art Center/Pace Galleries.

Sauls, university art collection registrar, co-curated the exhibit. She said she wanted to showcase Pace’s work because he is the patron of the gallery. Pace donated 245 works of art to the university.

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News: Eric Dever Hosts the Friends of Guild Hall at his Water Mill Studio, August 17, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Eric Dever Hosts the Friends of Guild Hall at his Water Mill Studio

August 17, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Photo credit Pam Abrahams, Friends of Guild Hall.

Eric Dever | Solo Exhibition
Berry Campbell Gallery
January, 2019

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News: Judith Godwin's, Woman, Acquired by the Denver Art Museum, August 16, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Judith Godwin's, Woman, Acquired by the Denver Art Museum

August 16, 2018 - Berry Campbell

This painting was exhibited in the Denver Art Museum's remarkably successful 2016 exhibition, Women of Abstract Expressionism.

Judith Godwin | Solo Exhibition
Berry Campbell
February 2019  

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News: Video Now Available: In Conversation: Jill Nathanson talks with A.V. Ryan about her solo exhibition, Cadence, at Berry Campbell, August 15, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Video Now Available: In Conversation: Jill Nathanson talks with A.V. Ryan about her solo exhibition, Cadence, at Berry Campbell

August 15, 2018 - Berry Campbell

In Conversation: Jill Nathanson talks with A.V. Ryan about her solo exhibition,
Cadence

Directed by Andrew Gurian

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News: An Exhibtion of Mike Solomon at the East Hampton Library, August 15, 2018 - Berry Campbell

An Exhibtion of Mike Solomon at the East Hampton Library

August 15, 2018 - Berry Campbell

Artist Reception and Lecture
Saturday, September 15, 2018 
6:00 pm  
RSVP  

A lecture by artist Mike Solomon, Ossorio Foundation founding Director:  The Creeks: Epicenter of the 1950 Hamptons Art Community

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News: Extended: Walter Darby Bannard | 1959 - 1962 at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami, August 15, 2018 - Berry Campbell